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Little Pink Ryukin?


CometSue

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I want one so bad.But it seems as if theyre hard to find.lol.Does anyone have any tips for finding one?If i have this correct theryre the result of calicos breeding.Some will be a solid whitish pink.Where would i go about getting one of these?

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I call 'em "pinkies" - and typically cull them. They are usually matt scaled and rather colorless.... not particularly attractive fish. Last year when I was breeding calico Ryukins, in one cross I got almost 40% pinkies. If you find yourself a breeder, I am sure they should be able to give you any pinkies you want.

I strongly suspect I have a few in my most recent fry batch. There is one particularly large, broadtailed fry that looks suspiciously "pink".

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I call 'em "pinkies" - and typically cull them. They are usually matt scaled and rather colorless.... not particularly attractive fish. Last year when I was breeding calico Ryukins, in one cross I got almost 40% pinkies. If you find yourself a breeder, I am sure they should be able to give you any pinkies you want.

I strongly suspect I have a few in my most recent fry batch. There is one particularly large, broadtailed fry that looks suspiciously "pink".

I think there beautiful.I'd never seen one before the other day.So i shouldn't have a very hard time finding them right?

I wonder why they come out pinkish.lol

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he fish has a distinct "redcap" but the body is pinkish - that is somethign different all together.

You can cause a fish's white colors to go "pink" by feeding it a high concentration of shrimp and other "color enhancing" foods. This can be reversed by reducing the amount of "color enhancing" foods.

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So technically i could turn any white colored fish pink?Wow that's odd.lol.Kinda neat though i guess if your a girl.lol.Does this hurt them in any way?I found this really pretty pinkish goldfish today at feathers and fins.It looks like a ryukin but it has these solid black eyes.Is it blind?

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he fish has a distinct "redcap" but the body is pinkish - that is somethign different all together.

You can cause a fish's white colors to go "pink" by feeding it a high concentration of shrimp and other "color enhancing" foods. This can be reversed by reducing the amount of "color enhancing" foods.

The fish was in a tank full of "redcap orandas". All the other ones had white scales with the red cap. This one had the red cap but it was pink and didn't look like it had any scales.

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he fish has a distinct "redcap" but the body is pinkish - that is somethign different all together.

You can cause a fish's white colors to go "pink" by feeding it a high concentration of shrimp and other "color enhancing" foods. This can be reversed by reducing the amount of "color enhancing" foods.

I thought you said it was possible to turn any white colored fish pink?Couldn't the oranda have eaten a bunch of shrimp and color enhancers?Now i'm all confused.lol

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Three are two distinct genotypes being discussed here.

First - the "Pink Ryukin". This is typically a Matt fish with soft gills - meaning the gill covers will appear to be pink - for the covers. themselves are mostly transparent. You will see the red gills through them. Soft gilled fish typically have the "button eyes" - meaning solid black eyes - too. They are most commonly seen in calico crosses and mixes - and rarely develop much color at all, remaining white or pink for their entire lives. The scales are mostly transparant and you will see the pink color of the fish's skin, etc. Since these fish commonly lack any color - white or otherwise - that is very attractive, they are typically culled by breeders. (You can get "soft gills" on a fish that is colored, though. Fish can also appear to have "button" eyes - and only be presenting a color around the eyes. Black buttons eyes are a bit different)

Second - a "white" fish or any fish with white portions to it's body can have its color influenced by what food it is fed. In some aggessive feeding programs, you can literally turn the white portions "pink" by feeding "color enhancing food". This food contains carotenoids pegment materials - and usually high vitamin A values. Foods such as shrimp carry a high concentration - and will "enhance" the red or orange color in a fish. In the white portions of thefish, though, you can get an undesireable (or maybe desireable to some) pinkish cast to the white areas of the fish. The intense, opaque white that is wanted for a white show fish is best maintained by feeding protein NOT heavy in carotenoids.

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Three are two distinct genotypes being discussed here.

First - the "Pink Ryukin". This is typically a Matt fish with soft gills - meaning the gill covers will appear to be pink - for the covers. themselves are mostly transparent. You will see the red gills through them. Soft gilled fish typically have the "button eyes" - meaning solid black eyes - too. They are most commonly seen in calico crosses and mixes - and rarely develop much color at all, remaining white or pink for their entire lives. The scales are mostly transparant and you will see the pink color of the fish's skin, etc. Since these fish commonly lack any color - white or otherwise - that is very attractive, they are typically culled by breeders. (You can get "soft gills" on a fish that is colored, though. Fish can also appear to have "button" eyes - and only be presenting a color around the eyes. Black buttons eyes are a bit different)

Second - a "white" fish or any fish with white portions to it's body can have its color influenced by what food it is fed. In some aggessive feeding programs, you can literally turn the white portions "pink" by feeding "color enhancing food". This food contains carotenoids pegment materials - and usually high vitamin A values. Foods such as shrimp carry a high concentration - and will "enhance" the red or orange color in a fish. In the white portions of thefish, though, you can get an undesireable (or maybe desireable to some) pinkish cast to the white areas of the fish. The intense, opaque white that is wanted for a white show fish is best maintained by feeding protein NOT heavy in carotenoids.

Ok now i'm starting to get it i think.So it is technically possible that nick saw a pink red cap oranda?Now you've got me all interested,and thinking lol.So totally off topic,but my little baby calico twintail has one "soft gill"I was kinda hoping he/she would grow out of this,I dont really find it attractive but she's a beautiful fish otherwise.But that transparent gill(pink gill) is just well....wierd.lol.Is there any chance she'll grow out of it?I had some comet fry that displayed this soft gill trait until about 3 inches long.My little calico is about i'd say 1/2 inch max.Any chance?Maybe?lol

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How pretty!! I love the solid white colorations, but they seem to be rather hard to find.

Would it be considered unhealthy for someone to feed a white fish a diet high in color enhancers just to get the pink effect? We don't want anyone subjecting their fish to undue stress or nutritional imbalance...

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I do not see why - as long as the fish got a good diet it is easy to incorporate coloration in the food.

Flamingos get their color from eating shrimp. Fish can too.

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