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Big Oranda, Little Oranda


terisather

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I just bought a big Oranda for my 20 gallon tank. I already have a little Oranda in a 10 gallon tank. They're almost identical twins, except for their size...very cute, both of them! I was just wondering what it would be like if I put the little Oranda in the big tank with the big Oranda? The first thing that comes to mind is that the little O would eat all the food at the top before the big O (who waits for his food on the bottom) could get any. Little O moves so much faster than big O too, he'd surely gobble all the peas before big O could get any.

I would love to hear any stories about moving big fishies with little fishies, let me know if this is a bad idea.

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You can put "little" fish with "big" fish if the little fish is not so little that the big fish THINKS it might fit in his mouth. Goldfish usually do not eat each other, but there are times when it is just too tempting to try to eat anything that a fish thinks might fit in its mouth.

This type of gluttony is, unfortunately, all too common. Goldfish will attempt to eat something that is too big to truly fit - end up getting the other fish stuck in their mouths and you are faced with a decision - chop apart the smaller fish to save the larger fish or lose them both. It is a very sad thing.

If you feel that the smaller one is at least twice the size of the larger one's mouth, then all should be fine.

As far as food - sinking food is infinately better for the fish - and it is natural for the fish to root on the tank's bottom looking for food. It would be a better thing to teach your smaller fish to look for food on the BOTTOM - it could help avoid swim instabilities in the future. Fish need so little food that it is very common that there is actually more than is truly needed in a tank and all do well as long as they root around and find it all. I overfeed - and I try VERY hard not to.

One lsat comment - in my personal opinion - 20 gallons is the right size for one Oranda. They are the Gentle Giants of the goldfish world - and quickly grow to 12 inches plus, given half a chance. I try to keep my Orandas in 30 gallons each - or 2 in a 40. The 10 gallon may not last too much longer with the one Oranda - but a 20 will not keep 2 for very long either.

:)

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OK, so now I'm utterly corn-fused. I've read in the forum that the fish should have flakes, and peas like, once a week...now you're telling me to teach the little one to bottom feed, how? On what kind of food? The first thought that comes to mind...stop sprinkling flakes on top and instead, submerge them when I'm feeding? That way they can sink faster?

I've also read in the forum that the reason they need flakes is for the nutrients, is there another sinking food that will give the same nutrients?

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Oooo Ooooo Ooooooo!!!

I was fixing the rocks in the big O tank and he came up and nibbled on my hand!....then, he started to rub his body against my finger and he rammed his head in to my knuckles! OK, yes I did try to pet him and he let me! He liked it!

Is this normal? Am I hurting him if I touch him?

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There are a fair number of sinking pellets and such that are excellent food for goldfish. Hikari makes some. Some of my favorites come from Goldfish Connection..... I really like ProGold, Spiriliana "flakes" (They sink nicely), and shrimp pellets from there.

If you have pellets that do not sink you can soak them for a minute before putting them in the tank. Squeeze the air from them as you pick them up. Placing the flakes under the surface as you release them will help prevent the fish from getting too much air as they feed. I have some flakes that I feed occasionally, too. I like to mix things up. But I place them so that they sink immediately.

As far as "petting" the fish - no, handling your fish once in a while will not hurt at all. The best way to move a fish around is to pick it up with a wet hand. Your hand will not pull scales/gills like a net will. But, YES, handling your fish more than needed can disturb the slime coat on the fish.

A fish has what is called a "slime coat" that covers the scales. This is actually a protective coat - a defense against many things in the environment. Parasites are slowed by a good slime coat. Damage is prevented. If you handle the fish too much, you can disturb or remove this slime coat, leaving the fish's skin open to opportunisitic parasites and bacteria.

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Awesome! So here's what I'm going to do....teach the little one (Booger) to bottom feed, he really is a little guy compared to the big one (Chubby). In the meantime, I can get some other types of food and learn to mix it up a bit. I think Chubby should stay in the big tank by himself for a little while at least, to make sure he is free of disease or that the comets didn't leave anything behind. Then in a couple of weeks, move Booger in with Chubby.

Thanks for all your help Daryl, I appreciate it! :D

So does Booger and Chubby, they said to tell you hi...

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