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Jaws Has Finrot


nickie73

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  • Test Results for the Following:
    Ammonia Level? .25
    Nitrite Level? 0
    Nitrate level? 0
    Ph Level, (If possible,KH and GH and chloramines)? ph= 7.2, KH/GH=0
    Ph Level out of the Tap?7.2
  • Tank size (How many Gals) and How long has it been running?29g been up since October
  • What is the name and size of the filter/s? Aqua Tech 20-40, Whisper 10-30
  • How often do you change the water and how much?Once a day, how much depends on ammonia level

How many fish in the tank and their size? 2 gf, demekin is about 3.5 inches, fantail is 4.5 inches <LI>What kind of water additives or conditioners?Prime <LI>Any medications added to the tank?no <LI>Add any new fish to the tank?no <LI>What do you feed your fish?Pro-Gold pellets, Mazuri gel food, veggis, fruit, peas <LI>Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt",no

bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus?yes <LI>Any unusual behavior like staying

at the bottom, not eating, ect no

Jaws' tail fins have been a problem now for a long time. He has always seemed to have trouble with them. He broke one a while back and it has never fell off or anything, but it just broke and bent. The same fin is now ripped and has turned black. As most of your know, this is an uncycled tank. I have nothing I can use as a hospital tank, no extra filters or anything. I tried giving him Medi-Gold before and it seemed to help his bloody streaks in his fins for a while, but now they are back, as well, along with the black coloring and shredded fin. My question is can I treat the tank with Maracyn with Hammy in there, too? Or, should I try the Medi-Gold again? What do you suggest?

I know I need to get a Rubbermade and another filter to use as a hospital tank, but money has been really tight for us lately and we just lost our house and have had to move, etc. I really hope you all can give me a suggestion on how to treat him. Thanks so much! Oh yeah, forgot to mention that the last time I used the Medi-Gold for his fins was last week of Oct. until first of Sept. and I gave it to him for 14 days then.

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I am not sure about the medicines you plan to use if Hammy would be fine in the tank, but has Hammy shown any symptoms because it is contagious.

What I did was extreme, but it worked. I raised the water to 83 degrees over a period of 3 days to kill the fitrot bacteria hat sharkie had since it dies at 82.6 degrees. I than used salt and melafix to treat the torn fins, but at least you will have rid yourself of the finrot bacteria, which will hopefully prevent it from spreading farther up the fins.

I am sure there are easier ways to go about this, but this is what I had to do since Sharkie's finrot was very close to his body. Let's see what others say.

I wish you the best of luck and if I had the funds I would send you money so you could get a rubbermaid and another filter.

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Nope, the black is so small that I doubt it would show on a pic. However, what makes me think fin rot is because the area where the black is on his tail fin is also shredded-looking and raggy; torn. Hammy's fins seem fine.

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Here's one description, which is what I had always read about it, the reason for asking if it was white on the edges:

Fin rot is a general term for necrotic loss of fin tissue, resulting in split or ragged fins. It is usually the edge of the fin that is attacked, although occasionally a hole may appear in the middle of the fin. The appearance of fin rot can vary between a distinct, semi-circular ?bite? shape and a ?shredded? effect.

The edge of the lesion is usually opaque or whitish. In advanced cases there may be some reddening or inflammation. The main threat from this fish disease is, if left untreated fin rot can slowly eat away the entire fin along with the fin rays and start to invade the fish?s body, leading to peduncle disease if the caudal (tail) fin is involved, or saddleback ulcer if the dorsal (top) fin is affected. Fin rot is a bacterial disease involving opportunistic bacteria such as Aeromonas, Pseudomonas or Flexibacter that abound in all aquatic environments. Secondary fungal infections are not uncommon.

Has it been getting worse, or is it staying the same as when you first started noticing?

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I guess it is a possibility, but I am really careful about not letting ammonia build up to a dangerous point in my tank. I always double-dose with Prime each wc and I do daily wcs; how much depending on the ammonia test I do before the wc.

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I know u do a good job with waterchanges, maybe is not from toxic ammonia but maybe from long exposure...... could that b? According to my seachem monitor anything above 0.2 is toxic, maybe there was a point where it was more than 24 hours before u added prime again??

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I know u do a good job with waterchanges, maybe is not from toxic ammonia but maybe from long exposure...... could that b? According to my seachem monitor anything above 0.2 is toxic, maybe there was a point where it was more than 24 hours before u added prime again??

Shamu has a good point about length of exposure. But I just wanted to comment on the 0.2 number and a technicality, before everyone starts freaking out about their test kit results...

There is a fine difference between what the Seachem monitors measure (free ammonia - NH3) and what most test kits read (total ammonia - NH3 & NH4+). Free ammonia is really the toxic one, so the monitor is doing a good thing by measuring that. But most test kits will give you the *total* ammonia, most of which is much less toxic.

By knowing pH and temp, you can convert total ammonia to free ammonia, and vice versa.

Here is a page explaining it:

http://www.thekrib.com/Chemistry/ammonia-toxicity.html

And here is a page with charts of the comparison:

http://dataguru.org/misc/aquarium/AmmoniaTox.html

As an example, note that with a pH of, say, 7.2, and a temp of 72F, in order to get close to a dangerous concentration of 0.2 ppm free ammonia, you need a total ammonia of 2.0 ppm (this will vary for other temperatures/pHs).

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Guest rockfish

I'm rooting for you and Jaws, Nickie. So sorry you're going through this and that you've lost your house. I wish I could help, but I know that you're in good hands here. Jaws is lucky to have such a caring mom.

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I know u do a good job with waterchanges, maybe is not from toxic ammonia but maybe from long exposure...... could that b? According to my seachem monitor anything above 0.2 is toxic, maybe there was a point where it was more than 24 hours before u added prime again??

Shamu has a good point about length of exposure. But I just wanted to comment on the 0.2 number and a technicality, before everyone starts freaking out about their test kit results...

There is a fine difference between what the Seachem monitors measure (free ammonia - NH3) and what most test kits read (total ammonia - NH3 & NH4+). Free ammonia is really the toxic one, so the monitor is doing a good thing by measuring that. But most test kits will give you the *total* ammonia, most of which is much less toxic.

By knowing pH and temp, you can convert total ammonia to free ammonia, and vice versa.

Here is a page explaining it:

http://www.thekrib.com/Chemistry/ammonia-toxicity.html

And here is a page with charts of the comparison:

http://dataguru.org/misc/aquarium/AmmoniaTox.html

As an example, note that with a pH of, say, 7.2, and a temp of 72F, in order to get close to a dangerous concentration of 0.2 ppm free ammonia, you need a total ammonia of 2.0 ppm (this will vary for other temperatures/pHs).

Yep, Fred, I have that ammonia table. Fumi gave it to me. There has never been a day that I forgot to add Prime and my ammonia has never gotten above 2.0. There were a few days before the move that I was monitoring it and trying to get it higher to start Bb's, but I was monitoring it closely and adding Prime, etc.

I'm rooting for you and Jaws, Nickie. So sorry you're going through this and that you've lost your house. I wish I could help, but I know that you're in good hands here. Jaws is lucky to have such a caring mom.

Thank so much!!!

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There is a fine difference between what the Seachem monitors measure (free ammonia - NH3) and what most test kits read (total ammonia - NH3 & NH4+). Free ammonia is really the toxic one, so the monitor is doing a good thing by measuring that. But most test kits will give you the *total* ammonia, most of which is much less toxic.

I think the question here though is...how much ammonia is too much for one fish, and okay for another? I think they have varying tolerance levels. For example...I have had zero ammonia in my tank for weeks now, and Lola still shows dark spots that look like ammonia burn. None of the other fish are. Even when undetectible with our test kits, it must be possible to affect a sensitive fish if there is a trace that can't be seen. In that case, Shamu may still be right.

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There is a fine difference between what the Seachem monitors measure (free ammonia - NH3) and what most test kits read (total ammonia - NH3 & NH4+). Free ammonia is really the toxic one, so the monitor is doing a good thing by measuring that. But most test kits will give you the *total* ammonia, most of which is much less toxic.

I think the question here though is...how much ammonia is too much for one fish, and okay for another? I think they have varying tolerance levels. For example...I have had zero ammonia in my tank for weeks now, and Lola still shows dark spots that look like ammonia burn. None of the other fish are. Even when undetectible with our test kits, it must be possible to affect a sensitive fish if there is a trace that can't be seen. In that case, Shamu may still be right.

This is true. However, what IF it is finrot and I don't treat it?

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if u dont treat it then his fins could wear away compltely and then cause more problems, i've heard that it can b fatal if not treated, so u might wanna get some maracyn 2 or something if it is finrot

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There is a fine difference between what the Seachem monitors measure (free ammonia - NH3) and what most test kits read (total ammonia - NH3 & NH4+). Free ammonia is really the toxic one, so the monitor is doing a good thing by measuring that. But most test kits will give you the *total* ammonia, most of which is much less toxic.

I think the question here though is...how much ammonia is too much for one fish, and okay for another? I think they have varying tolerance levels. For example...I have had zero ammonia in my tank for weeks now, and Lola still shows dark spots that look like ammonia burn. None of the other fish are. Even when undetectible with our test kits, it must be possible to affect a sensitive fish if there is a trace that can't be seen. In that case, Shamu may still be right.

This is true. However, what IF it is finrot and I don't treat it?

If it is fin rot and it is allowed to reach the origin of the fin, it may be deadly to the fish.

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Has his condition worsened at all Nickie? I asked above...but I think you missed it.

If the answer is yes.....prolly medigold is a good idea. You can feed for 14 days and see if there's any improvement. But I'd wait for an expert. Can you get a picture of his tail?

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Nickie, I'm so sorry about Jaws and feel that if it was disease setting in by now there would be red spots or farther symptoms. Chronic (comes and goes) finrot alone is so often caused by stress. Stress prevents the fish from producing the necessary enzyme to deal with otherwise harmless bacteria in the water. For stress alone type finrot meds will be harsh I feel.I know I've said this before but cycling is always very stressful on fish. I am also wondering, do you remove your fish by hand or net or cup when you do the daily water changes?

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Has his condition worsened at all Nickie? I asked above...but I think you missed it.

If the answer is yes.....prolly medigold is a good idea. You can feed for 14 days and see if there's any improvement. But I'd wait for an expert. Can you get a picture of his tail?

The light is so terrible in this room, that I prolly won't be able to get a good pic, but I will try. His fins have gotten progressively worse over the last few weeks. Last night, I noticed the black on his fin and where it is black, there is another tear.

Nickie, I'm so sorry about Jaws and feel that if it was disease setting in by now there would be red spots or farther symptoms. Chronic (comes and goes) finrot alone is so often caused by stress. Stress prevents the fish from producing the necessary enzyme to deal with otherwise harmless bacteria in the water. For stress alone type finrot meds will be harsh I feel.I know I've said this before but cycling is always very stressful on fish. I am also wondering, do you remove your fish by hand or net or cup when you do the daily water changes?

I don't take them out of the tank when I do wcs at all. I just syphon around them while they are swimming and then I refill the tank. He does have red streaks in his fins. I posted about them before we moved and was going to treat with Medi-Gold but decided not to in case it was caused by stress or something. Now, his fins are worse.

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