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Split Fins


wolfsong8

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Would anyone know a possible reason why my goldies' tails are always splitting. It seems once I get them all healed and looking nice, they split again! They have lots of room to swim around in the tank, but there are some plants that I am wondering if they are getting stuck on. I have never noticed them getting stuck, but I supposed it could happen. Also, I do not notice a lot of chasing or fighting amongst them. I am just worried about infections. Hasn't happened yet, as I watch them carefully, but I know that even with the best care they can sometimes come to harm.

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Really? I didn't know that plastic plants can hurt fins..... That's all I've ever had and I never had a problem. :idont

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Really? I didn't know that plastic plants can hurt fins..... That's all I've ever had and I never had a problem. :idont

yeppers, the plastic plants can have sharp edges on them.. Im going to try to find the thread... Silk plants are better for the fins/tails/scales..ect..

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I'm always battling high nitrates (it's in the tap water, as is amonia, grrr), I have a nitrate filter, but it's not greaet, even with 50%+ water changes every 5 days, with 3 goldfish in a 125 gallon tank, my common now has a split tail fin, but due to one of my children being in hospital, the tank is now up to day 7, without a change. So, personally, I'd put split fins down to water chemistry.

bw

cupoftea

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Hello Wolfsong. Could you tell us a little more about your tank ie. how big, how long running, what turn-over filtration and how many fish you have in there? Also, what are the water chem readings? These details may help throw up some clues.

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Hmm.... I know some fish (like my shubunkin) have wacky fins where it just looks like that. It doesn't get better, and it doesn't get worse.

But I've had this problem before, and is there a possibility of a decent amount of stress? That could affect the durability of the fins, and the speed that they heal. So I s'pose this just goes back to water params, and plant types....... :)

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I haven't noticed any parasites, and I have given both fish a thorough check. Unless the parasites are internal. But I have medicated the water several times, so I don't think it would be that. I do have plastic plants in the tank, and come to think of it, they are the kinds that come to little points. They have been in the tank since the beginning, and I have not had this problem until the last several months, but I am thinking this could be my biggest culprit. I may try and find some other plants to put in their instead. The water params are usually pretty normal. There was one point where the ammonia levels got a tiny bit higher, but I squelched that pretty quick! For other reference, there are two fantail goldfish in a 10 gal tank (USA). OK, I KNOW someone is going to rail me on the "too many fish in your tank" thing. I am well aware of it, but they are both pretty small, still, and we are getting a MUCH larger tank soon.

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well as long as you get that tank SOON. :) I've been in that situation before, in my earlier days I had A LOT more small goldfish in a 10 gall (like 20 *gulp* ) but it took too long for me to get a bigger tank. (after finding this site) and I only have 2 alive from those original 20. I was so inexperienced then......

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There are a couple of things here, Wolfsong:

Firstly, not all external parasites are visible to the naked eye - which treatments have you run just out of interest?

Secondly, water quality could be an issue here.

"The water params are usually pretty normal. There was one point where the ammonia levels got a tiny bit higher, but I squelched that pretty quick! For other reference, there are two fantail goldfish in a 10 gal tank "

Do you test the water every week? There should never be ammonia in a cycled tank. If there is, it suggests that the waste output is exceeding the capacity of the filter or that water changes are insufficient. In this case, organic waste levels rise too high and the tank quickly becomes acidic. Ammonia and a downward sliding PH will certainly cause the fins to look tattered or split. With 2 fish in a 10 gal you will need to make weekly water changes of a substantial size to keep on top of their waste output.

It might be helpful to post back with

(a) your water readings amm, nit, nate, PH.

(b) info about your water changing regimen - how much, how often?

© which filter you have and how many gals p/hr it turns over.

This way, we could be sure that your water is not the culprit. My hunch is that the plants are not your problem and it would be bad to focus on those and miss a problem which could escalate and make your fish sick. If we can rule out water issues, then you can think about the plants.

Hope to hear back from you.

Pixie :)

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Well, just when I thought I might be getting things under control, my filter broke! AAARRRGGGHHH!!! Because I just moved, I had to pretty much empty out all the water from the tank, but I was hoping that the filter I had would help cycle the new tank water pretty fast. No such luck. So now I have a whole new filter, plus "new" water. Does this mean I have to completely recycle my whole tank?

Here are my current params:

Nitrate: 40ppm

Nitrite: 0ppm

Hardness (GH): 300+ppm (Utah has wickedly hard water. Don't know what to do about that!)

KH: Maybe a little over 200ppm

pH: 8.4!

Ammonia: 0ppm

I only change the water once every two weeks, but I check my params once or twice a week. I have an Aqua-tech 5-15 Power Filter. Don't know how much water it's turning over in an hour, but I do know it is very bubbly and produces a pretty strong current ( I have "rest" areas in the tank so the fish don't have to constantly be battling the current).

The only meds I have treated them with lately is a little extra salt and some Melafix to help heal the wounds they have.

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Guest eric2601

I have seen split tails - split going with the vein - on Orandas - not my own - but others who have a propensity of tail rot or beginning infections of cottony wo;l; disease - which weakens the tail structure - the disease tends to follow the vein pattern and - ion so doing - makes horizontal splitting occuring in those infected areas - Products like Furanase will usually clean up the problem - but the issues I have mentioned usually precipitate from poor water quality and maintainance - in some cases poor quality foods, lacking water soluble vitimans - and even tanks lacking in proper mineralization contents will stress the fish skin structure and make it weak and easy to tear -

Check the quality of foods you are usingh - Include additives like garlic oil - shown to positively affect their overall health and vitality -I have no doubt that - where I have seen this - a dramatic imp[rovement can be helped by low level mineralization of the water during changes, water soluble vitiman supplements, and the ever - needed - water changes - on a very consistant basis.

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First things first:

"I only change the water once every two weeks, but I check my params once or twice a week."

With 2 fish in a 10g this is insufficient and is most probably the source of the problem. Water should be changed once a week and in overstocked tanks more frequently. Although the water tests will show when your nitrate is getting high it will not reveal the amount of unhealthy bacteria building up in the tank. Or a reduced amount of disolved oxygen.

Just as an example of this, my last water change was 1 week overdue (ie 2weeks since the last change), already one fish was floating up to the top and another seemed grounded in the morning. They respond very quickly when water quality is poor, so if they are subjected to this long term it begins to affect their immunity and general health.

So, I would try doing a couple of water changes per week - if that is not possible, time-wise, at very least 1 very large change of 80-90% week is necessary. Your fish should start to look better quite quickly once you remove this factor as a stressor.

Regarding the new tank and filter probs; Have you tossed out the old filter? I'm not quite clear. If not, the filter media will not necessarily have died off completely just because the pump broke. Did they become dry at any point or did you rinse them in untreated tap water? I would test daily, to look for spikes - so far the results are fine. A high PH is not a problem other than if there is an ammonia presence. Ammonia in a high PH becomes deadly very quickly. The flip side is that the beneficial bacteria thrive in a high range.

Post back with any other Q's you may have and good luck with the upgrade.

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