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New Tank


terisather

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Hello Everyone!

I finally got my new 20 gallon tank and it is set up. I have a 30 gallon Penguin filter and am running it with one filter cartridge right now. The tank has one live gf friendly plant in it and aquarium decor that produces bubbles. I went to the store and bought a 24 cent common gf to help me cycle the tank. I thought I had learned a lot of valuable lessons with the set up and cycling of my 10 gallon, but I am still confused as to what to expect from this new tank. The new tank has been up and running for 8 days. I have an API Master Water Testing kit and have been testing my new water everyday. Ammonia - 0, Nitrates - 0, Nitrites - 0, ph - 7.8. When I set it up, I used the recommended amount of Cycle and have used it once again, 2 days ago. I used water from a water change from my 10 g, rocks, and the old filter (my new Penguin has space for three filters) from the 10 g. I bought the tank so I could have more Orandas, I love my "Booger" (he is living in the 10 gallon right now) so much that I want more!

When can I expect to see "cycling" of the tank? When will it be safe to get my Orandas?

I have been reading all the posts on tank set up and have only been able to pick up tid-bits here and there. I want the whole story from top to bottom! :rolleyes: If any one can give me a summation of what to expect and answer my two questions, that would be much appreciated!

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I would think you would see ammonia very soon, as you're feeding the common goldie and of course, he's pooping :P Once that happens you're on your way.

Just wondering, what are you planning to do with the common? He won't be able to mix with orandas, he'll be too fast and eat all their food.

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A 20 gallon tank should have filtration that turns over 200-300 gallons per hour. I am assuming your Penguin does this.... what one is it? There are 330s...... That would be ideal. The problem with saying you have a "thirty gallon filter" is that the description is usually used for TROPICALS - not goldies. A tropical tank needs far less gph than goldfish.

If I read this correctly, you seeded the new filter with an old cartridge that was used on the cycled 10 gallon tank, as well as gravel from a cycled tank, correct? That is pretty great that you did that - it should speed your cycling immensely!

IF this is so, there is a good chance that your tank may cycle very quickly. I am a bit suprised that you are not seeing any ammonia or nitrite or nitrate. You should be seeing at least one of one of them - either ammonia/nitrite or nitrate if the tank is cycled. Depending on how tiny the common is and how heavily you are feeding it, you may not see much very quickly.

As pointed about above, it is a difficult thing to use a fish for cycling. If it is a fish that you "care about" then you are forced to do substantial water changes to keep the water healthy for the fish as the tank cycles. I, personally, am not comfortable using a fish as a "throw-away" cycling tool. But that is neither here nor there - I simply would like to encourage you to be responsible with the life of the common when you are done cycling your tank. Also keep in mind that a common - typically the type sold as feeder fish - is not given very good living conditions. They are grown fast and cheap - and frequently they carry disease and parasites. It can, potentially, produce you a cycled tank that is replete with bacteria or parasites or both - problems that the common may be more or less immune to, but your future Orandas may not be...... It is something to consider.

A fully grown Oranda is a BIG fish. I have 10 and 12 inchers. One is plenty in a 20 gallon tank. I have two in a 30 and have to give the tank extra filtration, 75% water changes every 4 days and care in feeding to keep the water well.

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While I understand where Daryl's coming from, I do think there's such a thing as a pretty safe cycle, *especially* when you're relocating filters, media, gravel, etc from an already established tank. I feel that if you watch very closely, do water changes as necessary, and especially if you're prepared to move them back to the already established tank should cycling in the new tank prove particularly problematic, that the risk, while not zero, can be quite low, especially for hardier fish. And, if there's some issue with the conditions in the old tank (such as overcrowding) the risk can not really be any higher than what they were already exposed to.

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Awesome! Daryl, I loved your reply. I went and looked at the box my filter came in, it is a 150 and cycles 150 gph...that's OK, I can buy a bigger one and will so I can have my Orandas. Oh yeah, does the fact that my Penguin has a bio-wheel make a big difference? And, I bought my commons at nnnn. So far, I haven't had any problems with any of their fish. But just in case, should I treat the tank for disease before I add the Oranda's? I plan to get small Oranda's and more tanks by the time they reach maturity.

I wish I could post a pic of my baby Oranda, Booger. He is the cutest fish I've ever seen, he's all black with a touch of orange on the gills and a white belly. In my opinion, his little shape is perfect, very round and compact body with an extra long tail. I LOVE him!!!

And yes, you understand correctly. I did a 50% wc on the 10 g the day I set up the 20 g and added that water to the new tank. Took about half of the rock from the 10 g and the old filter (which was one month old) and put it in the new tank as well. I have been feeding the common very well. Peas and flakes 2X daily. I did a test just now, still 0 on all accounts. However, it looks like the NitrAte level was a little above the 0, almost to the next color on the test card.

I know the use of fish to cycle a tank is a bad thing, but like I said, I do have a big gf bowl at work and will put the common in it by himself and see how long I can give him through daily water changes. His work will not be forsaken.

Thank you!

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dont put the common in a bowl :o its a living thing too u know! If u cant provide adequate living conditions then maybe u should give it to someone else or why dont u use the new tank for the common? They're great fish too and have just as much personality as any oranda does, I love my commons very much and would never dare put either in a bowl. I got a new 125 gallon tank which is their new home, if u put the fish in a bowl it will b severly stunted and since u know that a bowl is not good I find that quite cruel that poor little fish is equal in every way to an oranda.

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dont put the common in a bowl :o its a living thing too u know! If u cant provide adequate living conditions then maybe u should give it to someone else or why dont u use the new tank for the common? They're great fish too and have just as much personality as any oranda does, I love my commons very much and would never dare put either in a bowl. I got a new 125 gallon tank which is their new home, if u put the fish in a bowl it will b severly stunted and since u know that a bowl is not good I find that quite cruel that poor little fish is equal in every way to an oranda.

:exactly Well said Shamu. Or, you could always give the common back to the store, so someone with adequate room can adopt him. :)

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Hello Caroline Doodle, Shamu23, and Goldyfan!

The other day I went to a friends house and saw that she had a "zen" pond. When I asked her why she didn't have fishies in the pond, she said she didn't know how to take care of fishies in a pond. I begged her to take my two comets (the ones I used to cycle the tank, which by the way, they did an outstanding job). She agreed on one condition, that I help her to learn how to best care for the goldies in a pond. The pond is about 100 gallons and is an indoor pond. She has a huge filtration system and a few plants in there.

What can anyone tell me about caring for two small goldies in a pond? What is best to feed them? Should we have more than two gf in the pond? How big will they get?

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This is a question for the Ponds section - and there you should receive tons of good info for pond keeping. I was going to split this question out - but on further thought, think you might get better answers if I just start it as a new thread/question for you in the pond section. Look for your topic there.... OK?

:)

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Hi Daryl,

Actually, I did post the topic in another section however I don't think it was the pond section. Thank you for your time on posting it for me and I will look for it. My purpose in posting this message here was to inform the listed members that I had found a home for the comets other than a bowl on my office desk. I thought they might be happy to hear that the commons were used and then rewarded for their service. I'm taking the comets over to the pond today as I have already purchased my Oranda and don't want to keep the tank mixed for much longer, the comets don't give my "Chubby" a chance to eat! They're so much faster than he is...hee hee hee.

Thanks again Daryl...

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It is a pleasure to work with someone who truly thinks ahead!!!

I, unfortunately, do not always do as well. I posted up in this forum and then discovered your other one and subsequently moved it here. I applaud your reason for posting in Discussion, though. I wish I was so good at thinking things through, sometimes.....

:)

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