Jump to content

Too Much Waterchanges?


Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

As some of you might know, i just got 2 new fish two days ago. Right now they are in a 5 gal quarenteen tank ( I should get hit with the koko stick :peeka ). They're small, less than 2.5 inches including tail. No meds or anything added to the tank yet, but I will begin salting their tank tomorrow morning. Also, one of them has a whitish edge to the fins which I'm guessing is finrot, but I think it can be treated with salt.

I am just wondering if I'm doing too much waterchanges. This morning, I did a 50% WC and I just did another 50% a couple of minutes ago. I test for ammonia inbetween the WC's and it was less than .25 ppm......much much less. I just dont want them in any bad water or stunt them in any way. Will doing too much WC stress them out? Should I do fewer WC's ? Right now their swimming all over the tank and exploring it. After quarenteening is over, they will be put out in my pond :D

Thankies!

An :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

When I first started goldies I had 4 in a 5 gallon. I didn't know anything and I have already been hit with the koko's stick. Now all my goldies have 10 gallons.

My point is that I was doing water changes in the 5 gallon often. I didn't see much problems with none of my goldies getting sick. I did the water changes very slowly and was doing about 60% water change every day. As long as you take it easy and don't dump the water in all at once. Avoid having the water land right on your little goldies and make sure the water is the correct temperature with such a big change.

I am sure others will have different opinions, but this is my advice since I went through this.

I am just glad I found Koko's

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest eric2601

according to the pros - they maintain that even 90 to 100 percent per day changes - after doing numerous tests - are signifigant in maintaining the health of goldies - they maintain that - as long as the water treatments are maintained and there is no substantial alteration in salt amounts added, pH, etc - that they highly recommend the highest possible water change percentages per day.

On 7 tabnks I do 90% per day for the last 6 or so years - and I truly feel that the lack of disease is due to the daily chore - Now I wish it would prevent the wierd physical problems from occuring - but that is another issue....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I'm a complete newbie to goldfish, but one thing I did learn is that if you're worried about pouring water on your goldies, take a large mixing spoon (or something similar), hold it upsidedown over the tank, and pour the water onto the back. That way it's less of a giant gush into the tank and doesn't disrupt the fish and gravel so much. You just have to make sure the spoon is very, very clean (and not soapy).

Good luck with your new fish!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Thanks Eric2601 and Alyssa :D

Thanks for the spoon tip Alyssa, i'm gonna use :D Thats gonna save me so much time, I've been pouring in the water cup by cup LOL!!

Thanks for the Tip Eric2601, that makes me feel better about the water changes, hopefully, i'm doing more good than harm :D the tank is only 5 gal, so it's alot easier for me to do water changes like that . I just started to salt my tank to 0.1 , time to do some math problem for how much salt i need to add and stuff :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I'd love to find a one-handed fish-keeper... because it seems to me that everything in fish-keeping is... 'on the one hand... on the other hand...'

I'll give you the other hand here, so you know what to consider. What I can think of is:

1) too many water changes would prevent a cycle from happening if the ammonia doesn't build up enough to attract the beneficial bacteria. Now, assuming this is a temporary tank, as it appears to be here, you probably don't care much about that. But its something for others to consider.

2) The process of the water changing can be a little bit stressful. First, make sure the temperature and pH are matched, if not it'll definitely cause some stress. But even so, the physical process of having a pump put in the tank, the water sloshed around a bit, etc, might cause a small bit of stress. Our guy is always very curious, goes over and checks out the pump and your arm, etc. Other fish may not care a bit. Again, its a small factor, but if you're doing it twice a day, it might add up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

>__>

I always take my fish out of the tank when doing water changes. I normally place her in a 5 gallon bucket for around 10-15 minutes, as long as it normally takes me to do my thing. Taking her out of the tank can be stressful in itself, I suppose... But possibly less stressful than having water dumped in, or a giant syphon stirring up mess in her gravel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member
>__>

I always take my fish out of the tank when doing water changes. I normally place her in a 5 gallon bucket for around 10-15 minutes, as long as it normally takes me to do my thing. Taking her out of the tank can be stressful in itself, I suppose... But possibly less stressful than having water dumped in, or a giant syphon stirring up mess in her gravel.

Yeah, depends how you do it. We use a gravel pump to take out the water so its only mildly stressful, and use cups to move the new water in. I'd think that's less stressful than being moved to a bucket, but its not zero stress either.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest eric2601

lets try this again - iF YOU ARE AN AVID WATER CHANGER - TRY THIS - GET A COUPLE OF 5 GALLON BUCKETS - buy a submersable quietone pump like the model 1200. attach aquarium hose to the output. In my case I took an old Rena intake with a slatted end - and attach it to a small plastic inline plastic valve - and attach the valve to the other end of the outlet aquarium hose. Mix your water accordingly and pretest - plug in the pump - The inlet is below the water line and the slats disperse the water in the tank - and it sits securely on the side till you are finished. the valve lets you regulate the amount of output to the tank. One of us vacuums one section per change - while the other obtains the other 5 gallon buckets and pours the wqater into the pump bucket to continually feed - - if the temp starts to drop - we simply slow the water with the valve unbtil the heater catches up or vice versa with a chiller. Thw prime cap on the top of the Rena intake is convenient for cracking open when you unplug the pump - so that you negate any reverse suction of water back into the bucket. Setting the fill ultra slow - go and eat - - allowing stress free fill.<BR><BR>I usually prepare the buckets the night before - that way any additives are completed and chlorine has substantially dissipated - - it sure beats pouring buckets of water into the tank as I have heard some people do - and it allows you to have total control in the speed of fill to deter any shock.

post-14541-1198827502.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Theres really no such thing as too many water changes in a cycled tank or a QT tank that you do not ever wish to cycle (and shouldn't) As long as it is temperature and pH matched.

Most of the beneficial bacteria that support the nitrogen cycle and the health of the fish are living/hiding! in the filter media and substrate so removing the water will not remove many of those at all.

The real danger is in over filter cleaning. Replacing media instead of just rinsing it, or doing filter cleaning on all the filters on the same day -these are much more dangerous acts of error.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...