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Goldfish Stay At Bottom Of Tank


Guest oranda luver

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Guest oranda luver

hello again! I was wondering what does it mean when goldfish sit at the bottom of the tank? mine do this, but their dorsal fins are up when their sitting on the bottom of the tank. they have been staying on the bottom before i got the new fish though..well my tank info is:

  • Test Results for the Following:
  • Ammonia Level? 0 ppm
    Nitrite Level? ) 0 ppm
    Nitrate level? 40 ppm
    Ph Level, (If possible,KH and GH and chloramines)?
  • ph 7.5 , kh 200 ppm,
  • Tank size (How many Gals) and How long has it been running ? 55 gallons . 2 1/2 years
  • what is the name and size of the filter/s? 2 aquaclear 110 they pump 500 gal. per hour each.
  • How often do you change the water and how much? i change 1/3 of the water once a week.
  • How many fish in the tank and their size? 5 goldies their 6 --8 inches
  • What kind of water additives or conditioners? neutral regulator by seachem and alkaline buffer by seachem.
  • Any medications added to the tank? no
  • Add any new fish to the tank? yes
  • What do you feed your fish? omega one goldfish pellets, spirulina pellets, veggies, frozen worms...
  • Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt",
    bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus? no
  • Any unusual behavior like staying
    at the bottom, not eating, ect..? yes, staying on bottom.

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Staying on the bottom for longer than a few hours is not really normal, no.

When did you last do a serious overhaul of filter pipes and impellers? Has the temperature dropped or anything changed in the last

while? Has your seachem buffering capacity expired?

Did you quarantine your new fish?

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Guest oranda luver

Well, nothing has changed really. everythings pretty stable(ph, buffering capacity, water temp...)they acted this way before i got the new fantail. I was thinking maybe because of nitrate? the nitrate in my tank wont drop below 30 ppm, even after a water change. so, by the end of the week the nitrate is 60 or 70 ppm. or skin flukes?

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Yes both are possible. Or swimbladder beginning. Or maybe they are all female. Many females will bottom sit if they are full of eggs.

Other fish will bottom sit with a sudden drop in temperature. Larger fish like yours can reach a nitrate intolerance level, where once they could stand higher nitrates suddenly they cannot any more.

Nitrates over 20 or 40 (depending on the fish) weaken a fishes immunity and are now known to be responsible for some cases of 'flipover' disease. Nitrates at high levels will make the blood vessels in the tail and other fins dilate and the fish will lose energy

and be prone to infection. One good way to keep nitrates low as well as your regular water changes is to make sure you have some green algae in your tank, or plants.

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Guest oranda luver

well, they have been doing this for like 2 months. When i moved into my apartment, I moved my tank, and I took out 25 gallons of water and they acted really perky and responsive. they acted normal. every since then they have progressively gotten worse at laying on the bottom. I treated them with parasite clear (jungle) a few weeks ago. they dont act any different. in fact there is no signs of physical damage... which makes me think its nitrate. would having a bare bottom tank help with nitrate? I was also thinking about uping my water changes from taking out 30% to 50%. and my male oranda is starting to have swim bladder problems too.

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Your fish are very large and most probably your water changing schedule is no longer sufficient. I also still believe there may be farther problems ahead without quaranting a new fish. These problems can take 4 -6 weeks ( incubation period) for problems to be seen.

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Guest oranda luver

well, in the past 2 days I did a 50 % water change and i also put salt in my tank( 1 tablespoon per 5 gallons.) I took all of the gravel out and replaced it with river stones. I thought taking out that much water would make it cloudy but it didn't..and my goldies dont lay at the bottom 24/7. They dont have droopy fins. the only goldie that acts less okay is my male oranda, and he hangs around the surface of the water alot...but hes been doing this for 2 months(he's the only one). but if he has gill flukes, wouldn't he be dead after having them for that long? my nitrate tested 30 ppm. ( its usually 70 something...) what would the recommended water change amount be for fish my size (6 - 8 in.) ?

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what would the recommended water change amount be for fish my size (6 - 8 in.) ?

You want to deplete the nitrates down to 5-10 after water changes, so you'll have to experiment. You'll figure out the frequency by testing for nitrates daily after each WC.

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It may take changing more water more often - instead of once a week, you may have to change it once every 5 days or so - but I agree - you need to strive to keep the nitrates much lower. They should be no higher than 40ppm at the END of the week, before a water change. I aim for MUCH lower - 5-10ppm.

As far as flukes - a fish can harbor a load of flukes for its entire life. As long as the fish is young and healthy - other than the parasite load - it may or may not show any obvious symptomes. But once a fish has any other problems - from infection, poor water, high nitrates, cold water, etc. - the stress can cause the parasite load to "hurt" more - and you may see more symptoms.

Many fluke infestations can take multiple treatments. I just got fish in that were LOADED with flukes. I have treated with 5 rounds of Prazi - done 48 hours apart - and scoped between each treatment. At the end of 5, I have FINALLY not found any flukes under the microscope!!!! FINALLY. Whew. I hate flukes.

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Whats the nitrate level in your tap water? You said you moved, so something may be different about your new tap. If you can't get it down very low I have a hunch you may have a decent amount of nitrates in the tap, but you should test your tap water to find out its parameters. If that is the problem, you may want to consider investing in AmQuel+ or a similar conditioner that eliminates nitrate (Prime does not, it just temporary binds it to a non-toxic form, according to Seachem) and mix that into your tap before the water change.

If that is *not* your problem, and nitrates out the tap are very low or non-existant, then you need to do more and bigger water changes to get the nitrates to 5 or 10 ppm or less. We can't say for sure if thats the problem, but its the first step.

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