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"bubbles" Inside Of Fins-what Is It?


Guest kscoleman

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Guest kscoleman

Today I cleaned the 50 gallon goldfish tank like I always do it. Tonight I was looking at the fish and noticed both fish in this tank have bubbles of air (I think) trapped in the tissue of all their fins. At first I thought they were on the surface but they are definitely inside the tissue. There are many, many bubbles of something. Before I cleaned this tank I did my new baby goldfish (2 in that 29 gallon) that came out of quarantine last weekend. One of them has 2 bubbles on his tail. The bigger goldfish are much worse. (I did use the same Python hose on both tanks.) The water parameters are all where they are suppose to be. I change the tank weekly. The water temp was matched very closely.

Also, I cleaned the tank with my Geo. Jurapari with a different hose and water faucet right after the above tanks. When I got home from church 2 hours later, the G.J. was belly up but the two other fish in that tank were/are fine.

I cleaned these tanks while we didn't have power (electricity problems from a downed wire I am assuming because we had very gusty winds today.) The power was out for 6 hours- 4 hours after I cleaned the tanks. I removed the filter material and put new stuff in so nothing bad would happen with the bad bacteria when the power kicked in.

Has anyone ever seen this? I haven't in all my years of keeping fish.

* Test Results for the Following:

Ammonia Level? neg

Nitrite Level? neg

Nitrate level? none

Ph Level, (If possible,KH and GH and chloramines)? 7.5

Ph Level out of the Tap? 7.5

* Tank size (How many Gals) and How long has it been running? The 50 gal. has been up 7-8 months

* What is the name and size of the filter/s? The large double sided Whisper HOB

* How often do you change the water and how much? weekly and 75%

#How many fish in the tank and their size? 2- 6" and 5"

# What kind of water additives or conditioners? Prime

# Any medications added to the tank? no

# Add any new fish to the tank? no

# What do you feed your fish? ProGold and Spirulina

# Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt",

bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus? Just the clear bubbles of air or liquid in their fins.

# Any unusual behavior like staying

at the bottom, not eating, ect..? They are very quiet and staying on the bottom for the most part tonight.

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Have you ever heard of gas bubble disease? It is caused by a saturation of gases usually instigated via rapid decrease in pressure from the water source (in this case highpower hose) into the tank water. The pressure in a hose is very high and the total pressure of gases dissolved in the incoming water is higher than the atmospheric pressure causing a sudden extremity of nitrogen gas/oxygen/and or carbon dioxide. The situation is made worse if there is adiversity of temperature between the source water and tank.

You can see the bubbles under the skin (fins, eyes...any area) because as the gases that entered under pressure equilibrate

with the air, the excess gases are osmoregulated by the fish (whose skin is at the mercy of all water elements passing through them)and gas bubble disease occurs. Your fish will eventually start to float as the gas enters blood vessels.

The best cure is to eliminate the gas retention with a packed column de-gassing device (. Alternatively very slow and laborious small water changes back to back 10% x10 times with 10 minute inetrvals until 100% of the water has been changed. Avoid shocking the fish by a straight 100% change.

You can very gently squeeze excees fin bubbles out to the surface by stroking the fin in a downward motion. Just one time as stress must be avoided, the fish will already be in shock. I should start changing the water out first. Good luck and let us know how things go.

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Guest kscoleman

I never heard of gas bubble disease and it wasn't in the reference book I check whenI have a problem. A fish friend gave me a heads up though so I was able to check it out on the internet. The sites recommended air stones to reduce the excess gas from the water. 12 hours after adding 2 air stones to the badly affected goldies tank, the white one was back to normal. It took the orange one another 8 hours to lose all the bubbles I could see. I am not sure what may happen secondary to this so I am watching closely.

One thing I noticed when I was cleaning the tanks is that a connection on the python hose was loose and drawing some air. I wonder if that contributed to the problem as well (and I hope it did for future water changes)? I was in such a hurry to get them done because of the power failure and all, that when I couldn't tighten it quickly at the time, I left it for later.

Thanks for your help.

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I'm so glad to hear they are better!! This is an education for me as although I know about the disease I didn't know that it could be solved so fast by adding airstones. I suppose if the majority of gases are nitrogen though this would make perfect sense. Thanks for posting back with that :) .

I think the fish should be okay. They will have been in shock so just getting them back into their regular routine of w/cs and feeding should be enough. Get the hose fixed!! And maybe use it much more slowly next time so the pressure build up is weaker. Almost every time I make mistakes with my fish -lol I can put it down to being in a hurry or in a panic.

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Guest kscoleman
I was just wondering why you have no nitrates in a cycled tank?

I should have said 5.0 to none on the nitrates because the API kit showed yellow. {I had just done a 75% water change because the nitrates get too high in a weeks time if I don't- trust me, they are there!) It is a 50 gal. tank with 2 large goldies- about 5 and 6 inches. If I only did one small water change the nitrates get too high in 1 weeks time. I feed lightly I think since the orange one is a bit floaty to begin with. I have been doing 75% water changes for 4 years at least with 2-8 aquariums (because I don't have to watch my pH- it comes out of the tap at 7.5) and this was the first time I had a problem. I am hoping it is the hose myself because that can be fixed and identified if it is a problem in the future.

Everyone is fine tonight- yeah! Have any of you used real plants to help with nitrates? I have always been afraid of introducing diseases, but I certainly could use some way to lower the nitrates without more frequent, smaller water changes. I have 8 tanks 29-135 gal. currently (and 6 betta 6 gal. tanks) and use different pythons for most of them so it is a lot of hose changing etc. on top of the extra time it would take. Don't want to give up any of my babies so maybe I will have to quit my job!

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I actually thought that nitrates were ok as long as they weren't too high, that they were the sign of a healthy, cycled tank. I know that nitrITES are evil, and will kill your fish as fast as ammonia will, but I've never been overly concerned about nitrATES. I guess every tank is different, but I have 2 five to six inch goldfish in a 30 gallon. If I did 75% water changes every week, my water would cloud up so badly that you couldn't find the fish because of the bacterial bloom. I do a 25-30% wc weekly and rinse their filters.

It'd be interesting to know from a mod or helper exactly when the nitrates are high enough to be concerned about.

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