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Coral And Fish Pics!


jsrtist

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Some updated pics of our 75 gallon tank. Sorry, I watermarked them because I like to post large, hi-res pics! Also I have to credit Tolbert too because he took a lot of these shots.

The male mandarin, scavenging for pods:

IMG_1266.jpg

You can see Mandarin and Baby Mandarin (the formerly starved one!) by the clam:

IMG_1259.jpg

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Simply gorgeous! How long did it take you to get it set up like that and if you don't mind me asking (I'll understand if you do) how much money have you invested in it? I would LOVE to set up something like that on a smaller scale one day! Is it very hard to maintain and take care of? What is the minimum tank size you could do something like that in? Sorry for so many questions!!! :unsure:

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Thanks for all the comments! Yes, a reef tank is an investment in money and time. This tank has been a work in progress for almost a year now, and it was set up from 3 different reef tanks we owned-my original 30, a 55 and a 125. There is no minimum tank size as there are tons of nano tanks on the market these days. The larger the tank, the more cost is involved but you also have much more flexibility on what you can keep in it, and more room for error. Like I said, I had a 30 gallon before which is small for saltwater, and it was a lot of work. It was always full of algae and never looked great.

We have probably invested more than $2,000 on all of this. However, since we've both worked at a pet store for years, we didn't pay retail for most of this, so you could pretty much double that amount to see what it would cost to get going. We've also been fortunate to know a lot of people in the hobby who sell used equipment and trade things. "Fragging" is a big deal in reef tanks. It means someone breaks off a small piece of their coral colony and you grow it into a new colony. It is much more environmentally sound than buying large wild caught colonies. Some of our animals are wild caught but a lot are aquacultured, which means they were tank-raised. If at all possible, always buy aquacultured.

Nickie, you can look through the saltwater forum and see some posts about the nano tank. If you look back a year ago you'll see a thread from me about seting up my 8 gallon nano and what that involved. If you'd really like to get involved in saltwater, it's not a bad way to go. You can get the color and variety of critters without putting out a ton of money. Just read up a lot and ask lots of questions! :)

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Thanks for all the comments! Yes, a reef tank is an investment in money and time. This tank has been a work in progress for almost a year now, and it was set up from 3 different reef tanks we owned-my original 30, a 55 and a 125. There is no minimum tank size as there are tons of nano tanks on the market these days. The larger the tank, the more cost is involved but you also have much more flexibility on what you can keep in it, and more room for error. Like I said, I had a 30 gallon before which is small for saltwater, and it was a lot of work. It was always full of algae and never looked great.

We have probably invested more than $2,000 on all of this. However, since we've both worked at a pet store for years, we didn't pay retail for most of this, so you could pretty much double that amount to see what it would cost to get going. We've also been fortunate to know a lot of people in the hobby who sell used equipment and trade things. "Fragging" is a big deal in reef tanks. It means someone breaks off a small piece of their coral colony and you grow it into a new colony. It is much more environmentally sound than buying large wild caught colonies. Some of our animals are wild caught but a lot are aquacultured, which means they were tank-raised. If at all possible, always buy aquacultured.

Nickie, you can look through the saltwater forum and see some posts about the nano tank. If you look back a year ago you'll see a thread from me about seting up my 8 gallon nano and what that involved. If you'd really like to get involved in saltwater, it's not a bad way to go. You can get the color and variety of critters without putting out a ton of money. Just read up a lot and ask lots of questions! :)

Thanks so much for answering my questions! I would definately love to set something like this up on a smaller scale. However, I was wondering if you have to have fish in order to have a reef tank? I mean, do the fish help the coral and such to live in any way? I would love to just have a reef tank w/out fish, just coral and plants. However, if fish are a major part of being able to have a reef tank, then I am sure I could get a few to help it out.

Your tank is beautiful and you can tell that you have spent many hours of love and time on it, not to mention the money!!!

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You absolutely don't need fish to have a reef tank. "Reef" entails the invertebrates such as corals, sponges, anemones and such. I set up my first tank with just a large starfish, hermit crabs, shrimp and one mandarinfish. I loved that tank. Some people only set up fish tanks; some people only want reef tanks.

Consider one of the nano cube tanks. There are a couple posts under marine fish about that. You can have just some soft corals, as they will survive under that lighting. Did you see the green coral I posted called a zoanthid? Those will grow under the power compact lighting in the little tanks. If you look at the pic of my whole tank, on the lower left side you'll see a purple rock full of lime green squishy mushrooms. Those would survive in there, too.

You could have a fun little tank with just some soft corals and maybe some crabs or shrimp. I bet your son would just love it, too! I read your post about the aquarium he visited and how much he liked it.

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very pretty jenny i have been thinking of setting up a 20gal nano tank like one of those biocubes from red sea. i feel i have the experiene in freshwater and am prepared to move onto tougher things and my dads best friend owns a marine shop lol.

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gorgeous tank! I love ur mandarin fishies! I've always wanted a saltwater tank and did all the research but now Im not allowed to get one anymore cause I chose a little goldfish tank instead. Darn those cute chubby fishies faces!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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WOW! I love Mandarins!! I'll never have one because I am too lazy for a saltwater tank and definitely too lazy for a Mandarin (and too impatient to wait for a good copepod count!). Your tank is absolutely STUNNING!

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