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Fantails


Saiyori

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Okay, so I FINALLY figured out that my goldie is a fantail. He was 1 and 1/2 inches when we got him (almost a month ago) and now is not quite 2 inches. I need to know how big he/she will get and how fast. Thanks!!! :P

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Fantails can get nice and large - I have seen some around 10 inches including the tail. IT sounds like your little fish is off to a good start. Most of the fast growing is done in the first year of life. A goldfish goes from a tiny little dot with a thread attached to a 1 1/2 inch fish in about 3-6 months depending on variety. That is an increase of body mass many thousands of times over!!!!

You fish should reach about 3 inches in body length at about 1 year of age. That is about average. :)

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:yikes 10 inches!!!! wow, I had no idea.....I thougt 6-8 inches..... I am hopefully getting a 30 gal or so in about a month, but WOW, how long does it take to get that big? Oh, also, could you please tell me the relative size of some of the other common kinds of goldfish, this would be muc appreciated, thankies!!! :D
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The largest are, of course, the commons/comets. Of the fancies, Orandas tend to be the gentle giants of the water, but just about any other breed can get as large. The "length" of a fish can be misleading, for the size of a fat Ranchu at only 6-7 inches is HUGE - they are MASSIVE fish, where a looooooong, streamlined comet is much larger in length - it has only about the same mass at 10-12 inches.

Pearlscales tend to be a bit smaller - but they can make up the difference in mass - sometimes being fatter than they are long. Bubbleeye fish are about the same general size as the Pearlscales - I have seen them at 6-8 inches but not much more. Ryukins are as deep as they are long - and thusly can be massive.

Pearlscales, Bubbleeyed fish, Celestials, Fantails, Telescope eyed fish, Ryukin/Lionhead/Ranchu, ORanda, Shubies, Comets, Commons are a VERY rough guess as to size from smallest to largest.

Each fish's final size is greatly affected by several factors. One of the most influential is genetics. Within a single spawning of fish, you will have ones that easily outgrow their siblings - and ones that never seem to quite catch up. The big ones are perhaps the ones destined to be the monsters of the tank - the others, still great fish, are nice, average beauties.

The next most influential thing is culture - how the fish were raised from the day the eggs were laid. Plenty of good quality water and proper temperatures, along with the right amount/type of food go a long way to give the fish that carry the genetic potential for great growth a chance to fullfill that promise. A fish that was crowded in poor water with a lack of quality food will not grow as well as one that was pampered.

Time is the final thing - most fish do the majority of their growth in the first year of life. They go from a tiny thread size to a massive fish in a very short time. If the environment does not support this growth when they are young, they lose out on much of their best growth time in life - and will not be as big as those who have it all. All fish will continue to grow throughout life - but they slow down as the years pass. The presence of disease/parasites can dramatically slow a fish's development. They may not be problems serious enough to kill the fish, but they do not thrive as they would without such problems - and growth is slowed.

Because of the potential size of all these fish, it is essential that keepers realize what they are getting when they purchase that red flash of scales that catches the eye in the store tank. That fish can be with you for several decades - and grow to need at least 20 gallons of water - for some 20 is way too little. :)

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Pearlscales, Bubbleeyed fish, Celestials, Fantails, Telescope eyed fish, Ryukin/Lionhead/Ranchu, ORanda, Shubies, Comets, Commons are a VERY rough guess as to size from smallest to largest.

I'd say Ryukins body mass can rival maybe even exceed Orandas, especially those 9-10 inch-long short-tailed monstrosities.

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Because of the potential size of all these fish, it is essential that keepers realize what they are getting when they purchase that red flash of scales that catches the eye in the store tank. That fish can be with you for several decades - and grow to need at least 20 gallons of water - for some 20 is way too little. :)

I agree. I think with commons, comets, and shubbies, that they should be given more room even. Their streamlined bodies LOVE to swim distances. I have a 27 foot long pond and they can zip from one end to the other in just a few seconds. They love the room to zoom around and thinking of them in tight quarters, like a 30 or even 55 gallon tank is depressing. You just can't see their full potential in such a small space.

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Okay, because I have a fantail about 1 and a half inches and my mom has an oranda that is almost 2 inches. Thanks, this has been really helpful!!!

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I don't know how old my two are, we've had them for...eh....half a year, maybe more? And both are about 4-5 inches long with tail, but they are chubby guys! I think they're about half as wide as they are long :rofl

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The next most influential thing is culture - how the fish were raised from the day the eggs were laid. Plenty of good quality water and proper temperatures, along with the right amount/type of food go a long way to give the fish that carry the genetic potential for great growth a chance to fullfill that promise. A fish that was crowded in poor water with a lack of quality food will not grow as well as one that was pampered.

Time is the final thing - most fish do the majority of their growth in the first year of life. They go from a tiny thread size to a massive fish in a very short time. If the environment does not support this growth when they are young, they lose out on much of their best growth time in life - and will not be as big as those who have it all. All fish will continue to grow throughout life - but they slow down as the years pass. The presence of disease/parasites can dramatically slow a fish's development. They may not be problems serious enough to kill the fish, but they do not thrive as they would without such problems - and growth is slowed.

I've saved my 8 goldfish from a dirty overcrowded small pond. How much do you think that they still can grow over a year? they are 4 inces (I didn't measure the tail) 2 of 2 inches and the others between 1 and 1.5 inches.

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