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Using Salt


Trinket

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I just looked backed through the thread - I think what Trinket is referring to is reduced feeding in order to keep the water quality good enough to allow the intial salt concentration to be acheived without water changing. When the required concentration of salt is acheived for treatment, then fish can be fed whilst testing and monitoring the water quality and changing as necessary. I think this what Trinket was refering to rather than stoping feeding completely. The fish will need nutrition for strength, growth and recovery, but they'll need excellent water quality too. That's just my understanding of what she meant.

As for aquarium salt causing fish to retain fluid - I think that's rare unless the the fish is seriously weak and has impaired kidney function. I beleive the treatment dose of 0.3% salt for Ich is well handled by most fish - but obviously you'll need to use extra caution with small or debilitated fish. I think the salt you are referring to with regards to dropsy is Epsom salt and that indeed can be a useful adjunct in caring for a dropsied fish.

It may be best to keep any specific questions about dropsy and ich to your treatment threads, so as to keep all the info together. This pinned thread is just infomation/a discussion about the use of aquarium salt in general :)

Edited by mrbumblebee
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  • 4 months later...
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Don't be scared hun. That is well diluted in a 75 gallon, believe me. Dissolve it first in the tank water bucket thats going in and you'll see it soon disperses to invisible :whatjust: . Salt has been around as a salt medication years before most other meds and it really does work for so many things :)

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I will never use teaspoons because we have teaspoons and coffeespoons and I am way to confused by those spoons. I always forget wich one is the smallest.

Is it in massapercent? Meaning (if I remember correctly): If you want a 0.3% then that is 3 grams of salt for every liter (1000grams) water.

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I will never use teaspoons because we have teaspoons and coffeespoons and I am way to confused by those spoons. I always forget wich one is the smallest.

You could buy a cheap set of measuring points that have the labels on the handles that tell you the sizes... 1/4 tsp, 1/2 tsp, 1 tsp, 1/2 Tbsp, etc.

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  • 2 weeks later...
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I still think that wheighting the salt is the easy way. I am pretty certain that it is 3 grams of salt for a liter to get 0.3 %.

Could someone confirm me, wether I'm wrong or right?

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  • 2 weeks later...
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I still think that wheighting the salt is the easy way. I am pretty certain that it is 3 grams of salt for a liter to get 0.3 %.

Could someone confirm me, wether I'm wrong or right?

It may be the easy way or the hard way, depending if you have a kitchen scale easily available. If you do, I agree its easier - and more accurate, because some salts appear more tightly packed than other. Assuming we're talking percentage per weight, then yes, 1 liter of water is one kilogram, so 3 grams/1 kg = 0.3%.

For instance, the sea salt we have is about 5-6 grams per teaspoon. So one teaspoon per gallon is more like 0.15-0.2% salt.

If you lack a kitchen scale (well, I recommend getting one because they come in real handy for a variety of things - food, mail, this, and more), you can use the nutrition information on the back. For instance, our sea salt says 1.2 g in 1/4 teaspoon. So that's 4.5-5 g per teaspoon (the 1.2 is rounded, so it may be a bit more of less). Using that, one teaspoon per liter is 5g/1kg = 0.5% and one teaspoon per gallon is 5g/3.785kg = 0.13%, which is a little different than the 0.1% we've been told to expect.

To work backwards, if you have a 20 gallon tank, that's 20*3.785 kg = 75.7 kg. So you'll want ~75 grams of salt for each 0.1%. Use your kitchen scale to measure out 75 g (subtracting the weight of the cup) or use your package labeling to figure out how much volume that is for your particular salt.

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I still think that wheighting the salt is the easy way. I am pretty certain that it is 3 grams of salt for a liter to get 0.3 %.

Could someone confirm me, wether I'm wrong or right?

It may be the easy way or the hard way, depending if you have a kitchen scale easily available. If you do, I agree its easier - and more accurate, because some salts appear more tightly packed than other. Assuming we're talking percentage per weight, then yes, 1 liter of water is one kilogram, so 3 grams/1 kg = 0.3%.

For instance, the sea salt we have is about 5-6 grams per teaspoon. So one teaspoon per gallon is more like 0.15-0.2% salt.

If you lack a kitchen scale (well, I recommend getting one because they come in real handy for a variety of things - food, mail, this, and more), you can use the nutrition information on the back. For instance, our sea salt says 1.2 g in 1/4 teaspoon. So that's 4.5-5 g per teaspoon (the 1.2 is rounded, so it may be a bit more of less). Using that, one teaspoon per liter is 5g/1kg = 0.5% and one teaspoon per gallon is 5g/3.785kg = 0.13%, which is a little different than the 0.1% we've been told to expect.

To work backwards, if you have a 20 gallon tank, that's 20*3.785 kg = 75.7 kg. So you'll want ~75 grams of salt for each 0.1%. Use your kitchen scale to measure out 75 g (subtracting the weight of the cup) or use your package labeling to figure out how much volume that is for your particular salt.

Thanks :D

I've been using the kitchen scale for all kinds of things since I was 10 (the mail, baking cookies, weighing the guinea pig,...)

So a US gallon is 3.785l good to know :rolleyes: (I'm used to the metric stuff, since I mive in Belgium)

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  • 1 month later...
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People have mentioned that you need to take extra care when treating small fish with salt, but what qualifies as a small fish? My fish in particular are 1.25 inches, mostly black moor but I think partly something else, too. But it would be nice to have general guidelines as to which fish are small enough to need special care, because I doubt these will be the only goldfish I own in my life.

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After the cycle was established in my tank, in addition to Seachem Prime conditioner, I started putting 1 slightly rounded teaspoon of API Aquarium Salt and 2ml of API Melafix for each 5 US Gallons of replacement water.

I did the same for my Bettas first and they seemed to respond well to it, so I do it for the goldfish too. I guess it's not necessary, but they seem to be healthy and happy. So if it's not broke, I'm not going to fix it. ;)

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest DoodleBug

Isn't low dose salt supposed to be beneficial for goldies? I read, don't remember where, that it helps improve gill function and keep them healthy. I started using extremely low doses of aquarium salt in my tank (even lower than the recommended maintanance level, just to be safe) a month or so ago, thinking I was helping my fish. Is that not correct? Maybe I should stop adding it at water changes. I'm confused. :wacko:

The info on the iodine has me a little confused as well. Arizona Gardens recommends iodine for shrimp. I've been keeping a few ghost shrimp in my tank and was actually adding a little iodine for their benefit. Guess I won't be doing that any more!

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  • 2 weeks later...
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Some people swear by using a little salt on a permanent basis as a prophylactic (protective) measure. It may ward off some problems but it also raises the bar. Bacteria and parasites living in low salt will need that much higher salt to eliminate them when/ if stress followed by an outbreak of either occurs. Ponds for example that are kept at 0.1% year round need to raise their salt levels up to 0.4% and even higher to get rid of spring outbreaks of parasites. In fact the use of all year round salt may have led to salt resistant strains of parasites like some chilo strains which are now almost impossible to eliminate in salt as high as 0.8%.

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  • 2 weeks later...
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I wouldn't really use salt on a regular basis unless you have a specific reason too. We have an 11 year old goldie who has digestive/floaty/balance issues. A low level of salt seems to do him real good on improving his balance and boyancy. When I've tried to lower it I can tell he has more problems. If you want to do it, its not really a bad thing, but goldfish are freshwater fish so it'd probably be best only to do it if necessary.

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  • 4 weeks later...
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I am still trying to find my answer about adding salts....I have asked this question few more times in different thread but could not satisfy myself.

I have added 2 dosages (1 tsp/gallon) of API salts bought from nnnn to my 29 gallon fish tank to treat the ich/fluke which results my PH to go sky rocket around 9 or higher using API drops...did not check the high range PH.. Before adding salt I checked my water chemistry and everything was within range.

As a result of this I lost my two fantail goldies and I am still looking for answer what went wrong incase I have to treate again with salt.

Thanks in advance.

SandyDoss.

Edited by SandyDoss
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Salt should not be affecting your pH. According to the Salt Institute, sodium chloride (NaCl), or table salt without additives, has a neutral pH-- in other words, a pH of 7.0. NaCl is neither basic nor acidic, so it is highly unlikely that a 0.2% salt solution would cause your pH to climb to such an extreme level as 9.0+.

Have you checked your kH/gH levels (carbonate hardness)? If your kH has dropped too low, you may have had a pH crash. I suggest testing for hardness and exploring information about kH/gH and pH crashes.

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If "fredct"'s calculation is right (I hope so) in the earlier posts then I have added .4% of salt with 2 dosages. Since I have measured the API salts with a real teaspoon and not by a measurment cup (which usully comes with liquid Medicine). I should have been more careful.

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The formula for measuring salt is 1 TSP per 1 gallon = .1%. In a 10 gallon, that's 10TSP; in a 20gal, it's 20TSP, etc. Then you dissolve the correct amount of salt in tank water-- when it is fully dissolved, pour it back into the tank. For a 0.3% solution, you would do that three times over a 36 hr period to step the water up to a .3% salt solution.

The salt would not mess with your pH at such low, low concentration levels.

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Then may be my goldies died for a salt poisoning since I have added .4% in 24 hours. I am still confuse with TSP as 1 TSP (spoon) is different amount of salt as 1 tsp of measuring cup salt which comes with liquid medicine as per "fredct" post earlier in this topic. Is this right?

What I understand the smallest spoon in any US cafeteria is TSP, am i right as I don't belong to US though I live in US, basically I am from asian country.

I wanted to be sure as I am going get again goldies soon, may be after chaning my gravel which is too small for the goldies.

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Sandy a teaspoon is 5ml. That's a medium size teaspoon leveled off flat.

If you go back to the beginning of the thread the salt procedure is written out I thought as clearly as possible. As tofj says it is one 5ml teaspoon per gallon= first dose of 0.1%. Overdose of salt, especially added all at once will shock fish and can kill some fish yes. It's best to do salt adding with 12 hour intervals. This also protects your bbs (good bacteria) better.

The only salt that raises PH is sea salt. It is extra rich in borates which do have an impact on pH. But I always use sea salt and the pH never rises more than one point at 0.3%. Which is quite safe. Also, an alkaline slow raise in pH is not dangerous like a drop in pH always is.

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Guest Montman

When I used to keep goldfish several years ago I kept their water salted - but back then I didn't have live plants.

A couple of months ago I started up an old 58 gallon tank and have stocked it with goldfish and live plants.

Salt will usually kill a plant. Is that true of aquadic plants? Or is 1 tsp / gal too low a concentration to harm live plants?

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Montman--

I wouldn't keep live plants in a tank while salting. Most of us do not use salt continually-- just in times of stress, cycling, or illness. If you don't use salt all the time, your plants won't be harmed-- and you have the added benefit of fish that are not tolerant to low levels of salt. (Tolerant fish usually need a more concentrated salt solution during illness to be effective.)

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Guest Montman
Montman--

I wouldn't keep live plants in a tank while salting. Most of us do not use salt continually-- just in times of stress, cycling, or illness. If you don't use salt all the time, your plants won't be harmed-- and you have the added benefit of fish that are not tolerant to low levels of salt. (Tolerant fish usually need a more concentrated salt solution during illness to be effective.)

I haven't used any salt this time around. In fact I had forgotten about it until I saw some posts.

The consensus seems to be not to use salt continuously.

Thanks for the input. :)

Edited by Montman
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  • 2 months later...

Good Morning,

I will be converting my 55 gallon tank to Goldfish in the near future and am educating myself.

2 questions:

1) Is there any value in adding salt on a regular basis to a healthy tank, and how much?

2) Is the kind of salt Marine tanks use OK?

Thanks RoyML

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Adding salt constantly isnt good for goldfish. The only time to add it is when there is high nitrites and pests in the tank....Its not the same as SW tanks it has to be aqua salt. :)

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