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Guest Karly

Keeping Tank Cool - Suggestions Welcome

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Guest Karly

Dear All,

We have had some concern today about the temperature of the water in our tank. Our tank is a 3ft one in which we house two Black Moors. We have been trying to stop the temperature from rising above 72 degrees, but have noticed today that the temperature today has risen to 73-74 degrees. Does anybody have any suggestions for keeping the water cool rather than going down the expensive route of acquiring a water chiller?

:unsure:

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I would not worry too much about that temperature... it is fine. Goldies will do fine in much higher temps - up into the 80s with no problems as long as there is sufficiant oxygen in the water. Warm water holds less oxygen - so you need to make sure that you incorporate as much as you can.

Aim your spray bar across the surface so it agitates the surface. Add extra bubble bars that lift the deep water to the surface to gather oxygen. Make the bubble bars the super fine fizzy bubbles - so some oxygen will actually go into the water from the bubbles. Take the top off the tank so more air can pass over - or aim a fan at the surface. LEave the lights off during the heat of the day.

All these measures will allow your fish to do just fine in the higher temps. (80s and up).

You can create a home brew chiller by simply plunging your return water hoses into a bucket of ice/icewater. They will chill well. A 5 gallon bucket of ice/water with return hoses running through it will chill a tank well for hours. This would be an extreme measure - I did it last summer when it was over 100F and the power was out - no air, no nothing. I used the battery backup to run the single filter, with the hoses running through buckets of ice. It keep the tanks well for the 12 hours needed.

Some people will freeze a bottle of water and drop that into a tank. With large fish and a large volume tank, this will work, also. Be careful of small volume tanks and/or delicate or young fish, though. Pockets of very cold water can occur in this setup.

Keeping a sensitive black moor black can be more difficult with warmer water. In general, it is recommended that they are kept in the low 70s or upper 60s for the black to remain true. A permanent bronzing of the belly is often said to be the result of too warm temps in a tank.

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Guest Karly

Many thanks for your advice. We have removed the condensation tray from the tank so that some of the heat from the tank can escape. We will also change the time of the lights so that they come on later in the day (possibly 2-10pm instead of 12-10pm).

We have quite good oxygen supplies running into the tank - we have a Fluval 4 for our 159 litre tank and two air stones. Because we have an internal filter, we haven't been able to put any return hoses into a bucket of ice water.

We have put the tubes running from the pump to the air stones into a bowl of ice - do you think this will make any difference?

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We have put the tubes running from the pump to the air stones into a bowl of ice - do you think this will make any difference?

I don't think it'd make too much difference, the speed at which the air is going through the tube, there is not much chance of the air chilling much below room temperature, and even then, the heat transferal from the warm water to the small amounts of cooler air isn't going to be much more than it would be at the surface of the water. I wouldn't bother doing this, it'd be better to get a fan to blow across the surface of the water.

But as Daryl said, I wouldn't worry about the temp when it's still in the 70's even up in the 80's, it sounds like you've got plenty of airation. :D

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Just think about us poor people who live where its much much warmer than 80F :P In winter my tank is near 80! Most of the year its at least over 80, only for the few weeks of winter does it dip below 80. The air temp is usually near 100 most of summer (actually more like 1/2 the year).

Chillers are expensive.. My fish do fine with higher temperatures, but it could also be an acclimitisation thing, I mean they were bred and grown locally (I assume?) so don't know anything else. Sometimes when it's really hot (hasn't been this year, but previous years the tank temperature has been above 90) they are a little lethargic, but its too hard to cool down a 110gallon tank and even when their air temperature cools the tank doesn't.

Just keep the aeration up and bob's your uncle :)

P.S did I mention chillers are expensive? :P

P.P.S thanks to convert-me.com if only people would see the light of the metric system!!

Edited by svendenhowser

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Due to a heat leak in our building, my tank is always sitting around 80 degrees, even in the dead of winter in chilly Wisconsin! Fishies don't seem to mind... ME on the other hand... It won't be hard to keep the tank cool this summer, since my hubby is an A/C addict and it's in the same room with my fin-kids. I don't store away my sweatshirts and wooly socks just because it's summer OH NO, I keep them out to bundle up when A/C season starts! :D

Your fishies will be fine with the higher temps, just keep an eye out for sudden changes.

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I live in Las Vegas and our house is kept at 82* causing my fish tank to hang out around 78* during the summer months and 72* during the winter months (vegas pretty much only has two seasons, lol).

I have two HOB filters that aerate the water as well as a rectangular airstone and my fish seem to handle it just fine, and so does my snail.

I've read that warmer water causes their metabolism to speed up, though, so I make sure to feed my fish lots of food to fuel their hyperactivity. My fish and my snail are all little zoomers, CONSTANTLY moving.

I haven't had the tank during the hottest part of summer yet, so I am a little concerned. If it becomes an issue I think that I'll just stick an ice cube in the filter so that water being circulated becomes cooler....haven't tried it yet, but that's my plan. I'm not going to worry about it until my tank hits 82* or higher.

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Guest Karly

I haven't had the tank during the hottest part of summer yet, so I am a little concerned. If it becomes an issue I think that I'll just stick an ice cube in the filter so that water being circulated becomes cooler....haven't tried it yet, but that's my plan. I'm not going to worry about it until my tank hits 82* or higher.

I don't know if you have heard about this, but I have read somewhere that you shouldn't really add ice to the filter directly as it kills the bacteria in the filter (as they are living organisms).

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I don't know if you have heard about this, but I have read somewhere that you shouldn't really add ice to the filter directly as it kills the bacteria in the filter (as they are living organisms).

That would be my understanding too. If you add a source of extreme coldness to the filter like that you will rapidly slow down the activity of the beneficial nitrifying bacteria and could kill off large amounts as well. This could really bump your cycle, if not wipe it out. No, I certainly wouldn't do that, as Daryl says iced bottles can be added to an aquarium to gently reduce temperature if really needed (with caution), but personally I would never add ice directly to the filter unit.

Here is a thread with a link to some interesting information about nitrifying bacteria, especially the effects that extreme temperatures can have.

http://www.kokosgoldfish.invisionzone.com/...showtopic=53888

It most cases, beneficial bacteria multiply and thrive in warmer water and this is of course desirable, although of course over a certain point they will start to decrease and die off just as an extreme of cold.

I don't think you need to worry too much about temperature extremes in the UK (I'm in UK too), our weather is pretty moderate (maybe even desirable in terms of fishkeeping!) and in most cases we can control and prevent extreme temperature swings. Plus, we're having a warmer patch at the moment (warm for April anyway!), but well worth monitoring over the summer months anyway.

Actually, I deliberatley keep my Pearlscale goldfish tank at around 72-74C all year around (with a heater-stat) as I have found them to be more active and appear to be more healthier at this temperature, it also helps to control the "floaty" problems one of my peralies sometimes has - also they seem to poop mroe regularly too! :rolleyes: So, slightly warmer than ambiant room temperature can sometimes be heathly for all goldfish.

Just keep monitoring your tank temperature daily and maybe use some of the methods outlined by other members to control extreme temperatures should they occur. I find a lot of the time slight fluctuations are better left alone. They can be heathly for the fish and are more "natural". I also understand they are sometimes needed to promote spawning behaviour etc. anyway :)

Edited by mrbumblebee

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Guest Karly

It's been a bit cooler here for the last couple of days. Yesterday, the tank temperature range was 70-71.6 and today it has gone from 70.5 to 69.4F. Do you think a drop from 73-74 to 69 over two to three days is ok? :unsure:

How big a difference in the temperature and how quickly a change in temperature do I need to start worrying?

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Constantly fluctuating temperatures can cause problems, but a change in tank temperature due to the weather like that is actually fairly gentle, 4-5C over the course of a couple of days is actually fairly gentle, if it was a happening within a few hours then that would be more worrying and the cause would most likely be controllable to some extent (ambiant room tmeperature in your home, reducing lighting times).

When we deliberatley change temperature in a tank, for treatment purposes for example we say no more than a couple of degrees change per hour or so, but changes of a few degrees over a couple of days as you describe is not too much to worry about IMO.

Just keep monitoring it, remember that although goldfish are "coldwater" fish that term refers to the range of temperatures they can live in, rather than the fact that they must be in cooler water. Actually, fancy goldfish tend to do very well in the averageish UK room temps of lets say 64-68C, right up to the mid seventies and as described earlier, even into the low eighties (in a controlled way, with extra aeration etc.)

Wildly fluctuationing temperatures tend to be the more problematic ones, gentle fluctuations between night and day and cooler and warmer days can actually be beneficial.

If you're really concerned about temperature fluctuations (remember you will inevitably see some from now on right through the summer months though), you could maybe just check the temp twice a day (same times every day) and keep a note of the results just for a few days? This may help you to identify whether the temperature changes are just seasonal variations in ambiant temperature or are things which you can control (lighting hours, tank in direct sunlight, tank near heating source for example) Personally, I don't think you need to worry too much about it at this stage :)

Edited by mrbumblebee

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Guest Karly

Many thanks for answering my previous question - you have set my mind at rest that the changes in temperature I have been experiencing are fairly normal. I purchased a digital thermometer with a probe and have been monitoring the temperature and recording it every few hours since.

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