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Amonia Level Indicator


Guest jbyrd3810

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Guest jbyrd3810

My remaining goldfish (I did have 3, but I lost two not long after I got them) was showing the same signs as my goldfish that had already passed. I didn't want to loose him. So I went to the only local pet store we have here in town. (Which is also where I got my fish from, and wont be getting anymore from there after visting there today) But they didn't have any parasite treatment. (Curly was rubbing himself aginst the gravel, so I am pertty sure it was parasites) So I packed the kids up and we made the 30 minute drive to the next town over and went to mmm to pick up some meds. On a side note I was quite impressed with this store. All the cages were very clean, and the empoylees were very knowlageable.

Any ways why looking around I saw these little things you suctions cup to the inside of your tank that are amonia indicator. When it's yellow your good, when it turns green time for a water change. There were other color to indcate danger, but I didn't read any futher. I was really tempted to buy it for my fish tank, but it was almost $9. And I didn't want to spend that kind of money if they don't work really well. So I was wondering if any one else have used these, and are they worth the money?

Also we aquirred a new fish while there. We were walking by the Beta's and my daughter (4) fell in love with one she saw. It's a very pale yellow, or blond. She begged me until I finally gave in (I know bad mommy :) ) I asked her if she was sure she didn't want to get a more colorful one, but she insisted on the blond one. Before we left the store she had already named it Otoe. I have no idea where she got that from, but I thought it was a really good name for a Beta. I even went ahead and bought her a 1 gallon beta tank that was pink. This will be her very first pet. She is incharge of feeding him (only with mom's supervision) She has been in her room for most of the afternoon just watching him. I think it's so cute. I think she is going to follow in mom's footprints and love caring for fish (and other animals)

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I think I know what "ammonia indicator" you are referring to. I would not rely on it but it would make an exellent backup. You should just use a test kit and use the ammonia indicator in case the test strips do not work correctly. From what I hear, it works pretty reliably but is extremely innacurate.

Edit: (typo)

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I have one that does the temperature, ph, and ammonia. So far it has matched my test results so I am now convinced it works. Definitely plan on getting a new one when mine dies. I recommend it.

Get a good brand however. The cheaper ones are off sometimes. The one I had on my 2.5 gallon never worked right so I threw it out and busted out the extra money for the nice ones.

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Thats extremely cute with your daughter! The same thing kind of happened to my girlfri-..... thats a little weird. *creepyshivers*

I kid, I kid

Personally, I've been cautious of them. I have heard two stories wherein they have failed, seemingly from becoming too old. If ammonia is staying down like it should be, you wouldn't exactly know if its working ;)

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I used those in the past, when I had "baby" cycles..... In general, they worked well. They were the typical "fairly cheap" branded ones (I think they were about $5 way back then!) Mine only had "levels" such as "safe", and other labels I do not remember - but there were only 3 or 4.... not numeric readings.

They are "OK" for what you want. I found that they really did not give the fine nuances of the ammonia levels. I do not like ammonia greater than .25 - and want to know when a tank is bumping or having potential problems BEFORE it gets to the point whre the fish are negatively impacted by the toxins. The indicator would start to turn a bit, and I found myself testing nearly every time with a drop kit to see if what the indicator really meant. I remember finding that as soon as I saw a "Warning" level on the indicator, it was into the 1ppm ammonia level or more. That is FAR higher than I want ammonia to be before I am aware of it.

For that reason, it can be a good learning tool when you are starting. It can be a good reminder and a good thing for a child to see. It will not, should not replace the drop test kits (or even the dip tests, if you prefer) for they are far more accurate and will give you far greater lead warning BEFORE the water is bad enough to harm the fish.

If money is tight, invest in a good drop kit, instead. Your daughter will be impressed by Mommy playing scientist. She will follow in your footsteps and discover the cure to cancer.

:)

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I have one that does the temperature, ph, and ammonia. So far it has matched my test results so I am now convinced it works. Definitely plan on getting a new one when mine dies. I recommend it.

Get a good brand however. The cheaper ones are off sometimes. The one I had on my 2.5 gallon never worked right so I threw it out and busted out the extra money for the nice ones.

What brand was yours Sushi?

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