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Phtotograhing Methodologies


Guest Obninsk

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Guest Obninsk

Could someone share thier ideas and thoughts how to best photgraph Goldfish?

I'd like ideas about lighting, and things in general...I'v not had much success. my feeble attempts are either blurry or too under or over exposed. Any ideas, thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

I would be happy to share in return what knowledge I have regarding filtering & H20 quality, plantscaping & set-up, etc.

Thanks in advance!

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  • Regular Member

hi! :)

normally, since fish can move pretty fast, you should set your shutter speed as high as your camera can handle! that means that your shutter snaps the pic at a higher speed, cutting down on the blurriness.

next, try to turn off the flash. it causes a bright reflection off the tank. and if it's too dark, then increase the exposure so that your camera picks up more surrounding light.

what you might want to try is also turning on the "macro" on your camera. it allows you to take close-up pix with better details.

sometimes you can play with the focus too. you can select the distance (i.e. 1 meter, .5 meter, 5 meter, etc.), or you can select the area (i.e. center, spot, multi).

play around with your camera for best results! i'm a sony gal, so my experience is limited to my sony digital cameras. i play with canons often too, which are also pretty nice!

i hope this helped a little bit, and i hope some of our experts jump in to guide you too! they've got some pretty snazzy pix, as you can see! :exactly

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It's best if u got a camera that allows you to have some control over the shutter speed, exposure and ISO (if it's a digi cam). Best tool is of course a digi cam wih a manual lens.

Shutter speed must be at least 1/60 seconds to ensure a sharp image of the fish.

Lighting is of course essential. Bright, natural lighting from above is the best.

The macro function is sometimes a bit of a hassle cos it takes time to focus. Better to set the pic size to very big and shoot from farther away, then cropping it in photoshop or any other pic manipulating programs.

And the most important thing is to be patient :) take as much pic as u can, then sort it out later.

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Guest Obninsk

With what what you both have shared, that may be the devil right there: digital camera. I'm an old SLR manual kinda guy. As I know longer use nor have my Nikon, I'm now using a Kodak Digital....sounds like I need to go to school and learn how to use it in a more manual mode and learn all the features. I suppose "ISO" is the equalivant to the old "ASA" set up for old Film. I used to take a great deal of B&W and push the ASA 4x's and then used a hot developer...was kind of cool as you eliminated the flash and could get very crisp results- Ah! but I'm digressing.

Thanks to both of you for your help.

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SLR! i've seen the quality of those pix, and they are awesome! it's a shame you don't have that anymore... :( but for an arm and a leg, you can get a digital slr... :)

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I have a canon SLR but unless I can develop the pictures myself I tend to avoid using it now except for still life photoshoots. Now I mainly use my Kodak Easyshare. I have it on the close-up function and I test it with and without the flash to see what the lighting allows and how they come out. If I have to have the flash on I just don't put the camera right next to the tank and it doesn't usually reflect off the glass.

I haven't attempted them with my manual, even though I would love to. I just don't have the $10 to spend on getting it developed for a bunch of shots that might not have come out at all.

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i have a konica minolta digital slr, the camera is capable of far more than what i have the kills to do with it so far. they are much cheaper than the canon rebel digital slrs... well, they were... because upon visiting their website i found out konica minolta has sold out to sony ans is getting out of the photo biz. sad. my mom has a 35mm slr from them which is older than me and still a great camera. i am trying to learn more about my camera to take better pictures.

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Guest Obninsk

Aleiah:

If you think SLR's are the cat's meow...someday find yourself an old 4x5 format camera...that will rock your world, it's the stuff Ansel Adams and Annie lebowitz used! Better lens, wider focal plane, etc....

ILSb:

thanks...I have an Easyshare as well...it really does take excellent photos. I primarily bought it for the family so they can just P&S and download. To be honest I just haven't taken the time to really examine all the manual settings...it's not, from what I can tell, a direct correlation to an SLR. That is, Shutter speeds, ASA, F-Stops are't adjusted as they are on a SLR. It appears there are comparable settings and what I should really do, imagine this, is read the detailed user's manual...novel idea, don't you think! :)

The other thing someone else mentioned was lighting...to date I had the room dark with the exception of the aquarium lighting. Even though its a flouresecent, it has a daylight color rendition (K) so I don't have to worry too much about the colour being pushed into the funky side of the spectrum.

I have done so much fiddling with my tank set up that short of diving in the tank to swim with my pals, I just am now interested in taking quality photographs....I just really really like my GF.

I hope others post here to share thier opinions as this could help making sharing photo's in the forum just more cool; especially when people are asking detailed questions about GF type, identification and health issues.

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well, i'll give some of my tips

1. use the close-up setting

2. always use the flash. with out the flash, your pictures will most likely turn out blurry, unless you have high lighting. then the shutter speed will increase with no flash

3. Take pics at a slight angle to the glass. this way you dont get the flash reflection on the glass

4. Turn the resolution up on your camera.

5. you can resize the pics to a smaller size to make them sharper.

6. crop your photos to get rid of all the extra junk in the background.

7. put the fish in a small container, this way you wont have to chaise them everywhere trying to get a pic.

my camera is a samsung digimax A7 7.0 megapixel

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2. always use the flash. with out the flash, your pictures will most likely turn out blurry, unless you have high lighting. then the shutter speed will increase with no flash

Flash will make things look artificial. Use it as a last resort if u can

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Also if you can use natural sunlight as a background. Some of my best pictures have come out when the sun was shining through the back of my tank and no flash was needed. The fish tend to really like the sun too, so they perk up a bit and just seem to be in better photo moods.

I'm not the best at taking fish photos and half the time I'm not aware of what I do to get them. Pretty much I guess it will be taking everyone's advice and messing around with things and find what works best for you and your set-up. It's all trial and error.

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2. always use the flash. with out the flash, your pictures will most likely turn out blurry, unless you have high lighting. then the shutter speed will increase with no flash

Flash will make things look artificial. Use it as a last resort if u can

good point, but with out the flash, atleast on my camera anyways, it always turns out blurry :)

with flash

STA70284.jpg

with out flash

STA70285.jpg

notice how the flash also filters out reflections like my other tank in the background :)

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flash does the same thing to me, fuzzy. my tank is in such a dark place (even with the blind open on the window next to it) my shutter stays open way too long to catch a crisp picture. i have to use my flash. i suppose if i messed with the shutter speed i could fix this, but i'm just learning :)

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Guest Obninsk

IloveSpaceboy:

I saw you mentioned you had an Kodak Easy share as I do. I was surfing Kodaks sites to get more detailed information how to adjust and tweak customs settings for F/Stop, ISO and shutter speed. I found the following link that may be of use to you for your particular model. It has the detailed instruction of "how".

If you already know all this, sorry for the trouble, otherwise hope this is of some help.

here is the link:

http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jht...NC-8P3E53373771

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IloveSpaceboy:

I saw you mentioned you had an Kodak Easy share as I do. I was surfing Kodaks sites to get more detailed information how to adjust and tweak customs settings for F/Stop, ISO and shutter speed. I found the following link that may be of use to you for your particular model. It has the detailed instruction of "how".

If you already know all this, sorry for the trouble, otherwise hope this is of some help.

here is the link:

http://www.kodak.com/eknec/PageQuerier.jht...NC-8P3E53373771

Sweet, thanks for the link!

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • Regular Member

Then there's MY method.....Take a hundred pics.........find a couple good ones...lock them....erase all then take 98 more.....find a couple good ones.....lock......well you get the idea! :exactly Thank goodness for digital!!! :bingo:

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Guest Kiki Lola

I tend to sneakily comandeer my Dad's camera for my fish photographs. He has a SLR with a decent lens so I can take macro shots quite well and since my tank is plexi-glass (car windscreen material) it tends to reduce glare, so the reflection is minimal! Whilst I'm not suggesting you spend a fortune, you're less likely to get glare or blur with a lens camera than a disposable/regular digi camera.

I personally love the macro function, because if you get close enough to the tank, you can catch superb close-ups and detail on your fish :)

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