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cometgoldielover

The Secret Of White

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awrieger started a topic on the secret of black. Well I heard about a way to get fish white. And I guess it should be common sence after you read that post. Keep the goldfish in the dark, and it should turn white. I have no idea if this works, but I think it would be interesting to try. If someone doesn't mind thier fish losing color.

I would love to try this. Do one to turn it black, and do one to turn it white. It would be interesting.

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While I can understand someone wanting to bring out the deepest "Blacks" in their fish, that are black or have black markings by adding light or sunshine, I really could not see anyone keeping their fish in total darkness just to see if they would turn "White"! I think it would not only be unhealthy for the fish, but on the cruel side as well! Where it may seem like a fun experiment to try, I think the poor fish would suffer from it!

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I agree. This is an experiment that makes me think of all the other pointless inhumane experiments that have been done to animals, i.e. screwing up birds sense of direction in a lab and watching as they die trying to migrate in the wild.

Goldfish are ment to see sunlight, so they should see it. Forget how interesting something might be.

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Don't some goldfish turn white if you feed them tropical fish food for a while?? I have a comet out of our old 130 who is mostly white and he was fed tropical fishfood (because there were tropical fish in the tank). I have a pic posted of him in the goldfish photo section.

edit-- spelling

Edited by Anic

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Guest Spaz

Spaz turned all white, and I had lights on all day, and off at night. Sometimes they turn white just because it's what's in their DNA.

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Ya, I agree with the DNA thing. It's all in the genes. (reminds me of a joke lol genes=jeans lol) But I'm sure with different fish, different factors will effect them. Sooooo who knows? :)

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Keeping a fish in darkness would make the fish white, because I doesnt not recieve any visible or UV light to help the fish's enzymes make pigments. I would never do that experiment though.. I would feel to bad for the fish. But giving the fish a light of its complementary color, like for an orange fish a blue light, would help bring out more color for sure! It's just like how green plants like red light because it reflects green light and absorbs its complementary color the best, thus the green color we see it reflect off.

This is just a scientific way of looking at it though.. of course you could never change their DNA and the color the fish is ment to be.

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You want brilliant white?

Good Food and Good Light:

20061118-123013-800.jpg

20061118-124421-800.jpg

And it's good for the other colors too:

20061118-124052-800.jpg

White must be a pigment just like the other colors. No pigment and the fish would be pink like baby mice.

If you want them to be gorgeous with brilliant whites, take good care of them, don't torture them by keeping them in the dark.

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wow dfernandez77, your fish are beautiful.

they sure have grown alot too.

Edited by Fuzzy Peaches

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No need to go on the attack. I was just saying how it would be interesting. I never said I would. You would think I was posting that to a PETA board. I saw something menioning it and decided to post about it. No wonder some people only post a couple of times. They tend to get attacked.

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No need to go on the attack.

I hope you didn't think I was attacking you. I just showed pics of some comets that get sunshine every day, and their white pigment it very intense.

I think if any comments seem to be an attack - it's about the idea of keeping a goldie in the dark. It's a response to the idea, not to you.

Anyway, keeping it in darkness would probably make the fish pink like a cave fish (no pigment), not white.

maca-ImageF.00015.jpeg

http://photo.itc.nps.gov/storage/images/ma...Full.00015.html

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What about a Beta fish that is more-or-less pink, with what appears to be clear scales with a pearlescent pink/purple sheen to them?

Is that just a "white" fish? I don't think he's albino, he has dark eyes and a dark purplish spot on his tail.

Like this guy:

Picture043.jpg

Edited by TetraLover

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I wasn't really referring to your post, but I won't mention which ones I was reffering to. Anyhow, the idea of it is not that bad. You can't tell me you check everything you buy to make sure it wasn't tested on animals. And if you do, good for you. But I realize that fish have to be used sometimes, and living in the dark for a few weeks is alot better off then living in a feeder tank for a few days. Or in a fishbowl for a little while. Cuz other than being in the dark, the fish would be well taken care of. Say if I was to do this little experiment. My fish were well taken care of, even if I did not use fancy filters and whatnot. They had a large home and good food. And also good light.

I doubt it would be as bad as some people make it seem, especially if the fish is well taken care of otherwise.

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It would be the same if there was a black-out and you didn't get power back for a month. It's happened before. You'd still be able to feed the fish and change the water, maybe not filter it, but they'd still be getting the best possible care you can manage.

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No need to go on the attack. I was just saying how it would be interesting. I never said I would. You would think I was posting that to a PETA board. I saw something menioning it and decided to post about it. No wonder some people only post a couple of times. They tend to get attacked.

Ummm, did anyone really attack you? They don't like the idea of putting a fish in the dark for prolonged period of time and replied accordingly, not to you but to that idea, as Daniel said. Ur posting in a gf-oriented forum where everyone is striving to provide the best for the well-being of their fish, so those kind of response is totally fine, IMO, and expected.

The idea is interesting indeed, it's just not in the best interest of the fish.

You can't tell me you check everything you buy to make sure it wasn't tested on animals

Very true, and I agree with that. However, I don't think I wanna be the one that's doing the testing :)

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I suspect you don't need to keep them in the dark at all, just use a standard cheap fluorescent tube that come with some aquarium light fixtures.

The special 'sunlight' tubes you can buy for aquariums for example were actually developed for humans first. It was found that people who arrived at the office tower early and spent all day there under fluoro lights (even having lunch in the cafeteria with fluoro lights) so it would already be dark again before they left for home eventually became pale and ill with vitamin deficiencies etc. So they set about simulating natural sunlight in office environments to improve people's health by inventing new types of fluoro tubes. And now we use them on our fish.

So standard cheap aquarium tubes are pretty much the same as standard cheap office fluoroescent lights, which are virtually just one small step up from being in the dark anyway when it comes to the spectrum we and the fish need to keep our pigmentation and health. Which is why a lot of people's fish lose colour anyway even with a light on the tank. Even aquarium plants wither and die under standard fluoros for the lack of light they need.

Sunlight tubes and the Grolux tubes are much better, but as Daniel says, nothing can beat natural sunlight to simulate natural sunlight! ;) All the solid bright red and white and black fish everyone buys are like that because they are raised and bred in outdoor ponds under natural sunlight in China and the tropics of SE Asia. We can only hope to get as close as possible to natural sunlight to keep our fish's colours in our indoor aquariums by using special light tubes etc.

PS. Daniel, no pigment in a fish's scale actually results in a cobalt blue coloured fish like the top fish of your last picture. The transparent scales allow the blue blood and flesh to show through on the body and red around the gills (on younger fish) where the blood is more oxygen saturated.

From what I've read, I believe there are actually three types of pigment present or absent in goldfish scales (which makes goldies unique among fish) layered one on top the other to produce different combinations of effects. They are basically the nacreous (metal or absence of it, matte), the colours (gold, white etc), and then the blacks on top. So a cobalt blue fish like yours can only ever be matte blue due to the absence of the metal (and other two). These cobalt blues are the 'true blues' in my opinion, whereas the more common 'blues' people refer to are just a dusky coating of blacks, but that's another topic!

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PS. I'll just also add that you've raised a legitimate discussion point about the secret of white, Comet.

I'm finding that the red Grolux tubes I'm using to keep the blacks is making some of my fish's white scales go orange. Even on their bellies due to the light reflecting back up off the glass of the barebottom.

And also the reds are still fading to orange. So Grolux may work to keep the blacks, but not so good for reds and whites (which it makes both go gold).

So perhaps combining a blue 10,000K 'sunlight' tube with the Grolux would be a possible combination. I've tried using a UV reptile tube, but that gives the tank an eery green tinge which looks terrible so it's not something people would want to have on their tank to make it look nice.

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PS. Daniel, no pigment in a fish's scale actually results in a cobalt blue coloured fish like the top fish of your last picture. The transparent scales allow the blue blood and flesh to show through on the body and red around the gills (on younger fish) where the blood is more oxygen saturated.

So the blue is in the flesh, like a black chicken or a Chow puppy's purple tongue?

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PS. I'll just also add that you've raised a legitimate discussion point about the secret of white, Comet.

Thank you to awrieger and TetraLover. I feel much better now that I did not just alianate everyone because I brought up something like this.

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Hi, I think it could have more to do with genes only b/c my Butterball is an orange oranda and since I've gotten her I've noticed her tail developing white streaks yet there is no change with lighting. I do not know if you mean a change in color on their scales or fins or both but I thought I'd just post what I and others who've seen my fish noticed in the year and a half I've had them and she's about 4 years old. :)

karla

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