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I Finally Found A Solution


Guest chris345

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Guest chris345

i read some facts on the internet that one goldfish needed 10 gallons of water. i was shocked!! how could a little fish need 10 gallons of water . so i logged in and i wrote are my goldfish going to die! as an article on this website. I read the reviews on what people said. they all said if i didn't want to buy a 50 gallon tank(i have 5 fish) i could put them in a really large plastic box that is clear strong and sturdy. it looked the same as a fish tank. i even put a filter in the plastic box a heater and a thermometor. should i keep my fish in this box??? or should i keep them in my 10 gallon tank. I think this box is about 70 gallons. :rolleyes:

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  • Regular Member

Be careful that the heater doesn't touch the plastic side as it may melt it a little. Does the temperature in your home fluctuate throughout the day? If not, you may not need to add the heater.

Take a look at this too: http://www.kokosgoldfish.com/cycle.html

This will explain what you may see go on in the new fish home. :)

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:) Yes, if the plastic container is 70 gal, that is what you should use! Alot of people use the containers as tanks, they work perfectly and the large ones hold alot of water. Just make sure you have enough filtration and check on your water chemistry and you and your fish will be fine.

As one member already said though, be careful with the heater and the plastic sides of the container.

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I agree, plastic tubs are a very good solution to the problem. Your fish will definately benefit from having their waste diluted in 70 gallons rather than 10 gallons of water, so they should stay a lot healthier and it will also provide some growing room for them too.

I, like many others have a plastic tub (20 gallons) that I use mainly for quaranting new fish and as a sick/hospital tub. At the moment it is a tempory home for my new pearlscale.

You can keep your fish in there for a very long time, provided like the others said you, have enough filtration. You also need to monitor and test the water quality and water change as necessary the same as you would for a glass tank.

The only thing I would say and this is a personal choice somewhat, is that you may want to work towards getting a larger glass tank (or a couple smaller ones) at some point in the future if at all possible (and I know it's not always) because purely from the point of view of your enjoyment of keeping them -plastic tubs are great for large volumes of water, but there is nothing quite like viewing your fish through a glass tank.

On the other hand some people use them indefinately as "indoor ponds" and they work great. You sound like you're doing the best you can so that's all that matters. Good luck with them :)

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