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Guest dhlexpress_ny

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Guest dhlexpress_ny

Hello everyone. Just joined group and looking to learn a lot of all of you. Some basic info. I have a 30 gallon tank with two whisper filters. I had tank set up with two goldfish. Tank was up and running for over a year. About 6 months ago I lost one of the fish. Now yesterday I lost the other one. I took apart tank totally. I cleaned everything and plan on adding water and filters back today. I will let it run a few days before adding another fish. My question is this. My last fish (not sure what type) seemed more round than long. From reading here I gather those have more problems than the other longer ones. Can someone tell me what TYPE of goldfish would be best for a begginer? I do know from reading here one of the things I was doing was feeding them flakes without soaking them first. I know this is not a lot of info but I just wanted to get a general idea. Any questions you have please let me know.

Bill

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Well, the most hardy do tend to be the common goldfish due to the fact that its genetics haven't changed much from the carp and tends to be less problematic as far as the swim-bladder. However, they can grow very large and with your size tank, it'd be advisable to only keep one. :( I'm sure you think that's not very fun.

Do you know what your goldfish died from? Most goldfish will live for at least a decade if there aren't any diseases or cycling problems with the tank. Just in case, I'd like to make sure your tank was sufficiently disinfected.

Before adding a new fish, I'd advise a fishless cycle. Info available here: http://www.kokosgoldfish.com/FishlessCycle.html

A very quick and easy way to make your water safe after disinfecting. :)

Other than a common goldfish, you could try a pair of plain fantails, and get different colorings. I've had very good luck with these. Make sure to get sinking pellet food rather than anything that is meant to float on the top to reduce problems with swim-bladder.

Check at the "Goldfish Food" section of the forum and you'll see a lot of advice regarding vegetables that would also help.

Also, due to the high waste production of goldfish, I'd recommend at least 300GPH for your filtering. I know you mentioned what filters you had, but do you know how much GALLONS PER HOUR they do? The aim for goldfish is to clean the whole tank at least 10x an hour.

Keep us updated with your tank. :D I love hearing about new startups.

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Not sure what they died from. The first one I think was swim bladder. But the 2nd one showed NO signs of anything wrong. I just woke up one morning and he was gone. I checked water and amonia was fine. I have two whisper filters. One says Power30 and the other says Power40. Not sure how fast they cycle the water. Thanks for the reply will read that article and keep you posted.

Bill

Well, the most hardy do tend to be the common goldfish due to the fact that its genetics haven't changed much from the carp and tends to be less problematic as far as the swim-bladder. However, they can grow very large and with your size tank, it'd be advisable to only keep one. :( I'm sure you think that's not very fun.

Do you know what your goldfish died from? Most goldfish will live for at least a decade if there aren't any diseases or cycling problems with the tank. Just in case, I'd like to make sure your tank was sufficiently disinfected.

Before adding a new fish, I'd advise a fishless cycle. Info available here: http://www.kokosgoldfish.com/FishlessCycle.html

A very quick and easy way to make your water safe after disinfecting. :)

Other than a common goldfish, you could try a pair of plain fantails, and get different colorings. I've had very good luck with these. Make sure to get sinking pellet food rather than anything that is meant to float on the top to reduce problems with swim-bladder.

Check at the "Goldfish Food" section of the forum and you'll see a lot of advice regarding vegetables that would also help.

Also, due to the high waste production of goldfish, I'd recommend at least 300GPH for your filtering. I know you mentioned what filters you had, but do you know how much GALLONS PER HOUR they do? The aim for goldfish is to clean the whole tank at least 10x an hour.

Keep us updated with your tank. :D I love hearing about new startups.

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Not sure what they died from. The first one I think was swim bladder. But the 2nd one showed NO signs of anything wrong. I just woke up one morning and he was gone. I checked water and amonia was fine. I have two whisper filters. One says Power30 and the other says Power40. Not sure how fast they cycle the water. Thanks for the reply will read that article and keep you posted.

Bill

Hm, I wasn't able to find the GPH for those models right away, but it looks like the Power30 is "designed for 30-gallons" & the Power40 is "designed for 40-gallons." So I'm assuming you're hitting at least 300GPH, which is good.

With no signs of an illness, I guess it could really be anything. Even a stuck rock in its throat. :(

As part of keeping goldfish, you'll want to have tests for not just ammonia, but also for nitrite, nitrate, and pH at the LEAST. If you find that your pH can't stay steady for very long, you may look into getting tests for kH & gH as well -- these will see how well buffered or how stable your pH is.

The goal is to get 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite, and <20~30 nitrate. If you're unable to purchase a test kit, your other option is to manually take your water to a local aquaria petstore and ask to have your water checked for you. You'll want to have exact numbers from them, or else they'll just say "good" or "bad."

If after reading the fishless cycle article and you decide you don't want to do it (maybe too excited to get a fish), then only have one fish cycling for you. It's very stressful for goldfish do go through the cycling period of a tank and I certainly don't want you waking up to another dead pet again. :( Plus, you'll go through a lot of water changes by having a fish in the tank during a cycle and it can be very bothersome.

At least with a fishless cycle you just add ammonia and let it go for a few weeks. No muss no fuss. :D

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Guest dhlexpress_ny

One other thing. I was talking to someone yesterday and they told me when they add the filter cartridge they dont add the charcoal. They just put in the white floss. Is that better?

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Charcoal is useful for absorbing organic waste but is used up very quickly, between 1 to 4 weeks depending on the quality. Basically, if changed regularly it will help keep the water cleaner. Also, you cannot use salt when using charcoal, it will release all the stored waste back into the water. Also charcoal will absorb any medications so it needs to be removed beforehand.

With sensible stocking levels and good water maintenance charcoal isn't necessary but it's and individual choice.

I wouldn't recommend using charcoal when starting up a new tank as it will lengthen the cycle by absorbing the waste.

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Hi and welcome!

Some of the best things you can do is read as much as you can on water quality (gf require different things than other fish).

Read up on space, cycling and over all maintance of gf.

You can find everything here on Koko's site. It is the best and most informative site on gf.

Hang around, ask questions and you'll be amazed how much you learn that you didn't know.

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Hi Bill,

Just want to let you know that youo came to the right place for help. I'm new at fish keeping also and i got so much help from the members here.

As far as the type of goldfish you could try, i would recommend the fantail. I have one and it seems to be very hardy and they are beautiful also.

Good luck

Andr?e

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Can someone elaborate on the salt and charcoal info that was just given. If you salt a tank then the charcoal doesn't do anything as far as absorbing toxins. So do most people keep their tank salted at all times or do you just salt for health and quarantine reasons. I feel a bit dumb if this is true because I have never known that. I have even been putting extra carbon in my filters to help with my previous ammonia problem, of which it dodn't seem to help at all.

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In my experience, I haven't seen carbon do anything with ammonia (or maybe the goldfish simply produce so much that it overwhelms the carbon :idont ), so it's really a waste of time and money to rely on carbon all the time.

As far as salt, I've heard from numerous people on the boards that they use it in low percentages (0.05~0.1%) as a general tonic to keep electrolytes in the water and to avoid gill-damage from sudden spikes of nitrite. I've also heard from other people that they don't like keeping salt because it may result in parasites that become immune to the level of salinity and you're forced to up the dosage if there ever becomes a breakout.

So I think carbon & salt is becomes really the preference of the owner.

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In my experience, I haven't seen carbon do anything with ammonia (or maybe the goldfish simply produce so much that it overwhelms the carbon :idont ), so it's really a waste of time and money to rely on carbon all the time.

As far as salt, I've heard from numerous people on the boards that they use it in low percentages (0.05~0.1%) as a general tonic to keep electrolytes in the water and to avoid gill-damage from sudden spikes of nitrite. I've also heard from other people that they don't like keeping salt because it may result in parasites that become immune to the level of salinity and you're forced to up the dosage if there ever becomes a breakout.

So I think carbon & salt is becomes really the preference of the owner.

Yes- but one of the most important reasons to kick up the salinity- is Osmotic regulation of body fluids - fish vs environment- remember chemistry 101-

Question of the day- go back to chem class- when the permeable bags had two different color liquids and the concentrations of salt were different in both- what went which way- higher conc fluid permeating into lower concentration side- or vice versa - this is a 10 point question lol/.... the clock is ticking- and after you have the answer relate it to the operation of the fish body and see how much stress is reduced- and work- physically is reduced by adjusting the equilibrium of the water-

Eric

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Hello everyone. Just joined group and looking to learn a lot of all of you. Some basic info. I have a 30 gallon tank with two whisper filters. I had tank set up with two goldfish. Tank was up and running for over a year. About 6 months ago I lost one of the fish. Now yesterday I lost the other one. I took apart tank totally. I cleaned everything and plan on adding water and filters back today. I will let it run a few days before adding another fish. My question is this. My last fish (not sure what type) seemed more round than long. From reading here I gather those have more problems than the other longer ones. Can someone tell me what TYPE of goldfish would be best for a begginer? I do know from reading here one of the things I was doing was feeding them flakes without soaking them first. I know this is not a lot of info but I just wanted to get a general idea. Any questions you have please let me know.

Bill

lol- we will probably say - the one we have lol- Oranda- like mine- have a unique personality which will amaze and make you smile daily - all fish are quite detailed care needy- at varying levels- but i believe great individual personality shows in the Oranda

ie link to my Punch:

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Yes- but one of the most important reasons to kick up the salinity- is Osmotic regulation of body fluids - fish vs environment- remember chemistry 101-

Question of the day- go back to chem class- when the permeable bags had two different color liquids and the concentrations of salt were different in both- what went which way- higher conc fluid permeating into lower concentration side- or vice versa - this is a 10 point question lol/.... the clock is ticking- and after you have the answer relate it to the operation of the fish body and see how much stress is reduced- and work- physically is reduced by adjusting the equilibrium of the water-

Eric

Dried salted fish is delicious...

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Yes- but one of the most important reasons to kick up the salinity- is Osmotic regulation of body fluids - fish vs environment- remember chemistry 101-

Question of the day- go back to chem class- when the permeable bags had two different color liquids and the concentrations of salt were different in both- what went which way- higher conc fluid permeating into lower concentration side- or vice versa - this is a 10 point question lol/.... the clock is ticking- and after you have the answer relate it to the operation of the fish body and see how much stress is reduced- and work- physically is reduced by adjusting the equilibrium of the water-

Eric

Dried salted fish is delicious...

Bite your tongue!!! My Punch saw your comment and he is packing his bags !!!! lol

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