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New Goldfish Coming Soon


lepirin

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Unless my ride bails on me, I'm going to the pet store (45 minutes away) on Monday to get at least one new goldfish . . . and I'm a nervous wreck. I have to get everything ready for him, and I don't know if I'm doing it all right.

Hopefully the pet store will have a itty bitty pearl scale, if not, I think I may be getting another moor, but I'm not entirely sure, it'll all depend upon their selection on the day, which look healthy and which seem to want to come home with me.

So when I brought home my original fish, I'm sure I didn't so it properly . . . I'm aiming on changing that this time.

I am going to borrow one of the three filters I have running on my larger tank and use it on the quarantine tank. It will leave the large with 10x filtration and the quarantine with 15x filtration.

Right now I have the tank sitting full of dechlorinated water, just waiting until Monday to come. I have not adjusted the PH of the water yet, as I am planning on testing the baggie water, and matching it to that, does that make sense?

I float the baggie in the water and then add a little bit of the tank water to the baggie, then wait and add a little more, and then wait, and then let the fishies out?

How long do I keep them in quarantine?

As long as I'm buying them from the same pet store, odds are they both have been exposed to the same things right, I don't need to worry about quarantining them from each other?

Should I salt the tank? If so, how much salt? I'm planning on getting some of the smallest fish they have, and at some point I saw someone say that babies don't tolerate salt so well.

If I do salt the tank, I need to whip up a bucket of dechlorinated salt water to rinse my carbon insert in first right? That'll get it to release any ickies it is holding before I start running it on the tank?

What else am I missing?

And don't you dare threaten to hit me with the stick! I promise to take lots of pictures, I can't promise they will turn out . . . but I promise pictures.

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I wasn't planning on salting the big tank, I get too worried about salt creep to do it unless they get sick. I haven't salted since I cycled back when they were in the little tank.

I was thinking about salting the little tank to help with any possible parasites that they could be bringing home.

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Unless my ride bails on me, I'm going to the pet store (45 minutes away) on Monday to get at least one new goldfish . . . and I'm a nervous wreck. I have to get everything ready for him, and I don't know if I'm doing it all right.

Hopefully the pet store will have a itty bitty pearl scale, if not, I think I may be getting another moor, but I'm not entirely sure, it'll all depend upon their selection on the day, which look healthy and which seem to want to come home with me.

So when I brought home my original fish, I'm sure I didn't so it properly . . . I'm aiming on changing that this time.

I am going to borrow one of the three filters I have running on my larger tank and use it on the quarantine tank. It will leave the large with 10x filtration and the quarantine with 15x filtration.

Right now I have the tank sitting full of dechlorinated water, just waiting until Monday to come. I have not adjusted the PH of the water yet, as I am planning on testing the baggie water, and matching it to that, does that make sense?

I float the baggie in the water and then add a little bit of the tank water to the baggie, then wait and add a little more, and then wait, and then let the fishies out?

How long do I keep them in quarantine?

As long as I'm buying them from the same pet store, odds are they both have been exposed to the same things right, I don't need to worry about quarantining them from each other?

Should I salt the tank? If so, how much salt? I'm planning on getting some of the smallest fish they have, and at some point I saw someone say that babies don't tolerate salt so well.

If I do salt the tank, I need to whip up a bucket of dechlorinated salt water to rinse my carbon insert in first right? That'll get it to release any ickies it is holding before I start running it on the tank?

What else am I missing?

And don't you dare threaten to hit me with the stick! I promise to take lots of pictures, I can't promise they will turn out . . . but I promise pictures.

sounds like you have a good plan. make sure when you release your new babies not to pour in the pet store water... scoop them out with a net and release them into your quarantine tank.

i think the minimum time for quarantine is 1 week. many of us make the mistake of either getting to eager and adding them to the main tank or not quarantining at all. :ignore so it's good you're quarantining. :D

salting the tank should be ok... just make sure you remember that salt doesn't evaporate with the water, so when you do water changes you only have to make up for the amount of water you take out because the remaining water already has a percentage of the previous salting. haha that sounds confusing.

and as for rinsing the carbon filter, i think you might be confusing that with zeolite... rinsing the carbon filter won't release the ickies from it. it'll just get some of the gooey slimey beneficial bacteria and debris off of the filter. usually the directions tell you to replace the carbon once a month, but many of us here at koko's don't use the carbon (unless we're removing medication from the water). we take out the carbon and replace with some kind of media that the beneficial bacteria can grow on. :)

can't wait to see your new fish!!! :heart

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Hooray, new fish! ^^ Hopefully everything will go well for you.

I have not adjusted the PH of the water yet, as I am planning on testing the baggie water, and matching it to that, does that make sense?

I?m a little uncertain on this ? I think you should have the PH at whatever you would normally have it at in your tanks before acclimating the fish. The way you?re planning on acclimating sounds perfect to me ? I remember being recommended to do it over the course of 15 minutes, adding some tank water every 5 minutes before release (without any LFS water as Tinkokeshi said).

As for quarantine, I QT for 4 weeks. Everyone has a different length of time they think is best, though. I wouldn?t go less than 2 weeks, and that wouldn?t include any time they are actually sick.

For example, if you QT for 8 days, then your fish suddenly develop Ich, and it takes you 3 days to clear it, you wouldn?t count those 11 days as valid QT time. You?d QT them for 2 ? 4 weeks after all the problems are cleared up. This is just my opinion, though, not really a rule.

QTing any fish you get together should be fine.

Salt is definitely a good thing to have during QT. I?d recommend a 0.3% for the entire time? But I have also heard the tiny fish (especially baby Pearlies) are sensitive to high salt. You?ll just have to monitor how they react ? start with 0.1% as usual (1 teaspoon per gallon or perhaps even less; 0.05% maybe, which would be 1 teaspoon per 2 gallons), and keep them in that for a while to see how they handle it. And you have probably heard that you should raise it slowly, no more than 0.1% higher per day.

I?ve never heard of using salt on a carbon insert, actually, so I don?t know about that.

I think you?re good to go, really. ^^

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:) I agree with Kiya, you have to acclimate the fish to YOUR pH, not the other way around. Otherwise you might have a heck of a time trying to change your tap pH all the time. This will be easier on the fish AND you in the long run.

I like to quarantine for at least 2 weeks, partly because most LFS's have a warranty on their fish for the first 14 days after purchase.

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sounds like you have a good plan. make sure when you release your new babies not to pour in the pet store water... scoop them out with a net and release them into your quarantine tank.

What is the reason for this? Just an assumption that the store water is bad and houses ickies?

salting the tank should be ok... just make sure you remember that salt doesn't evaporate with the water, so when you do water changes you only have to make up for the amount of water you take out because the remaining water already has a percentage of the previous salting. haha that sounds confusing.

Nope, not confusing at all, I've salted for nitrites when I was cycling, so the procedure is familiar to me. I just wasn't sure of the quantities of salt to use during quarantine.

and as for rinsing the carbon filter, i think you might be confusing that with zeolite... rinsing the carbon filter won't release the ickies from it. it'll just get some of the gooey slimey beneficial bacteria and debris off of the filter. usually the directions tell you to replace the carbon once a month, but many of us here at koko's don't use the carbon (unless we're removing medication from the water). we take out the carbon and replace with some kind of media that the beneficial bacteria can grow on. :)

I could have sworn that people had been advising that you be careful when salting a tank that contains carbon filtration, because it could release all of the stuff it had stored, just like zeolite does. I would remove the carbon from my filters, but right now I'm using the inserts that came with them. When it comes time to replace them, I'm going to grab some aquaclear sponge and cut it to fit, and then just stuff the back with bioballs or ceramic noodles. Combined with the biowheel should do a pretty good job I think.

I?m a little uncertain on this ? I think you should have the PH at whatever you would normally have it at in your tanks before acclimating the fish.

My reasoning for that, was that if the PH of the bag is extremely low, I don't want to raise it higher than needed in a short amount of time. I figure since they are going to be the only ones in the tank, I could raise it slowly up to what the normal tank is over the course of a few days, rather than forcing them to go up from 7 to 8 in a matter of minutes.

But if you guys think that it is better to raise it before putting them in, then that's what I'll do.

Salt is definitely a good thing to have during QT. I?d recommend a 0.3% for the entire time? But I have also heard the tiny fish (especially baby Pearlies) are sensitive to high salt. You?ll just have to monitor how they react ? start with 0.1% as usual (1 teaspoon per gallon or perhaps even less; 0.05% maybe, which would be 1 teaspoon per 2 gallons), and keep them in that for a while to see how they handle it. And you have probably heard that you should raise it slowly, no more than 0.1% higher per day.

Okay, I'll salt salt to 0.5 before I head to the store tomorrow, and hopefully they'll do good with that, and then bring it up 0.5 every day, just to be on the safe side.

:) I agree with Kiya, you have to acclimate the fish to YOUR pH, not the other way around. Otherwise you might have a heck of a time trying to change your tap pH all the time. This will be easier on the fish AND you in the long run.

Well I have to adjust my tap water every time anyway, it is about 6.8 out of the tap usually, so I have to raise it before I use it. I thought adjusting it to match what the fish were used to to start out with was a good idea, and then slowly over a few days bring it up or down to 7.6 (where my larger tank maintains at) would produce less stress on the fish than a quick adjustment.

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I?m a little uncertain on this ? I think you should have the PH at whatever you would normally have it at in your tanks before acclimating the fish.

My reasoning for that, was that if the PH of the bag is extremely low, I don't want to raise it higher than needed in a short amount of time. I figure since they are going to be the only ones in the tank, I could raise it slowly up to what the normal tank is over the course of a few days, rather than forcing them to go up from 7 to 8 in a matter of minutes.

But if you guys think that it is better to raise it before putting them in, then that's what I'll do.

:) I agree with Kiya, you have to acclimate the fish to YOUR pH, not the other way around. Otherwise you might have a heck of a time trying to change your tap pH all the time. This will be easier on the fish AND you in the long run.

Well I have to adjust my tap water every time anyway, it is about 6.8 out of the tap usually, so I have to raise it before I use it. I thought adjusting it to match what the fish were used to to start out with was a good idea, and then slowly over a few days bring it up or down to 7.6 (where my larger tank maintains at) would produce less stress on the fish than a quick adjustment.

As long as everything is done slowly and to a point that has no fluctuations, I think your plan is fine. :)

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