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Fishless Cycle


Infoseeker

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I started my first fishless cycle 14 days ago.

My readings are now Amm 0, Nitrites <.3 Nitrates 12.5.

I am using Tetra Test Kits

Checking my tap water today it also contains 12.5 Nitrate.

My question is - should I start to add daily drops of Ammonia or wait until

the Nitrites are reading a little higher. ??

Infoseeker (UK)

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Can anybody advise on how much ammonia per day I should

start to add. 20 UK gall

I started with a reading of 4 Ammonia when I started.

Because my tap water contains a reading of Nitrates will I always

have this as my minimum reading when the tank is cycled even when

I perform regular water changes.??

Cheers

Infoseeker (UK)

Thanks a lot for this message board..

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I am assuming that first, you have read this:

http://www.kokosgoldfish.com/FishlessCycle.html

:)

If you added ammonia such that the readings stated 4ppm ammonia, you should be fine. The ammonia will not start to drop until the first type of bacteria that processes the ammonia grows a sufficiant colony - one that can process ammonia nicely. When you get enough of this type of bacteria growing in your media, you will see the ammonia drop. When it drops to 0.25 or less (zero) you will have to start adding in ammonia to the tank on a daily basis - to mimic the waste a goldfish would produce on a daily basis. Until the ammonia drops to zero, though, you have no need to add more at all! If you get the ammonia much higher than 4ppm it can actually slow the development of your cycle.

It has now dropped to zero - so you should have a lot more nitrite than you are reading. But lets go with that now......

When the second type of bacteria kicks in and grows, you will see the nitrates rise and the nitrites lower. At that time, you will be heading down the backstretch towards home and the cycle is nearing completion.

You will be adding enough ammonia that if you were to take a reading immediately an addition, you would see it at about 1-2 ppm. If you are going to have a fully stocked tank it will not hurt to pump up the colonies of bacteria so they can handle 2ppm ammonia on a daily basis. Test the water each morning - before your addition. The ammonia should be zero. If it is not, add less ammonia - or have patience and the colony will grow.

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Thanks Daryl. I will start in the morning adding a small amount.

Thank You

Also I have a rescued comet. This fish shoudn't be alive after reading all your posts

about water conditions.

It has been kept in a small 1 1/2 gall tank for years. Water changed about once a month when cloudy.

No filtering. No air, Water changes involved 100% unconditioned COLD tap water.

I am now keeping this "healthy" looking fish in a bigger tank, just changing 50% every week with conditioned water. It has never

known "cycled" water in its life, just pure tap water left until it stank.

What are it's chances of living when I put it into cycled water when my tank is "finished"

Also being left in a little tank for 5 years would it grow given a better environment ?? it is now about 9cm total .

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Many fish survive unbelievable conditions for a short time. It is like a balancing act, though. Goldfish are quite strong fish and can withstand harsh conditions fairly well. But one small problem that comes into a system like that can quickly kill. A simple parasite that, in a clean tank, would cause little problem and could easily be eliminated, could kill within hours. The same for a bacteria - one could run through a system killing all within hours....

A fish that is given good water and room, should live well. If you find problems - parasites/infections etc. you will most likely be given the time to respond to those problems and hopefully solve them before they kill the fish. Good water gives you time to respond to a problem

A fish that has had many years of harsh treatment will never grow as large or as fast as a fish that has had nothing but the best from spawning. This does not mean, however, that your fish will not grow. They all grow - slowly perhaps, but continuously. If the fish is no longer using up all its life energy on survival, it can put that energy into growth.

Good on you for saving that fish!!!! :)

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