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Theory


tropicana

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ok i read on the internet that wen growth can hinder fish growth.....

i have 2 oranda's, one's a red cap and the other is a blue oranda, my blue oranda is bigger then my red cap and has only just started to grow his wen, while my red cap is smaller and his wen is growing nicely, so is it true that the fish can stop growing until the wen grows?

any light shed on it would be great

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I do not think that is right - or at least not completely right.

When a creature grows, it can sometimes put its growth energy into one area or another of development - immune system, body, tail, etc. If there is limited resources for growth (food, space, etc) the "chosen" area will grow more than the other areas.

Much of the way a fish or any creature grows is genetically programed. This program can be affected or altered by nurture, but nature will lay down the basics. If your fish is genetically programed to grow a large tail at a young age - or a large wen, given good living quality and food, it will do so. Many fish can grow a tail or a wen at a young age - but then the wen or tail can weigh down a body that is not massive or muscular enough to support that tail or wen. The fish with the slower growing tails or wens are often the picks of the show breeder because of this.

A fish that is overweighted by a ponderous tail or wen may also have trouble competing for food - it may not be able to swim well or feed well. This lack of nutrition may slow down the entire fish's growth.

A fish that has a fast growing wen will not stop growing altogether while its wen grows. Nor will the wen stop growing while the body grows. The genetic predisposition toward early or late growth will determine how your fish develops. Most show breeders generally prefer moderation in all things. A fish that does not develop a wen too early has time to grow a large, muscular body to support a wen. A fish that does not grow one too early may not have one "overgrow" the fish's eyes. A fish that has a moderate tail will eventually grow the tail it is genetically inclined to grow, but if it is grown later in life, the body has the mass to support the larger tail properly.

Your fish will grow. Give them good food, good water and good space and time, and they will grow to the best they can.

:)

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Daryl is right.

I know when puppies are cutting teeth and having new ones come in, all their cartlidge in the body stops growing for the moment and all energy is put into the teeth coming in.

Once the teeth are in the body starts growing in other places.

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Did you get the two fish at the same time/place? I have read (one source only) that sometimes, factory breeders of orandas (and other wen-growing fish) will diliberately stunt their oranda's for an extended period of time, but in this time the wen grows a lot, because the fish is aging despite its size and probably the special enhanced food they are feeding them. So when some orandas are bought at the fish stores, they may be smaller but with a well-developed wen, and this is why. I have actually seen a lot of oranda's at my fish store that fit this description, while my two that I got as babies are growing bigger with limited wen growth at this time, since they aren't even a year old yet. (this is more normal.)

Your two fish may be from different breeders or something, maybe thats why the red cap fits the description above. And the blue could be developing on a more natural level.

Just a though lol, I have no idea.

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I strongly doubt that that theory is true. "Factory Breeders" are interested in one thing only - getting as much money as possible in as short a time frame possible. To do this, they want to grow the fish as big as they can in as short a period possible. The bigger the fish, the more money it garners. The less time it takes - means the less care and money put into the fish.

I seriously doubt that they would have any reason to "stunt" a fish. It is not easy to do - typically a fish that is "deprived" will suffer in size/health, etc. They cannot sell little scrawny fish for as much money.

:)

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that is what I initially figured as well. They may be trying to genetically breed some of theit lines down to a smaller size so people can get away with keeping the fish in a smaller area, if it is happening anywhere. Not all breeders are in their hobby for outcomes of beautiful healthy big goldfish, many are simply doing is for an income, supplying to any fish store they can. I don't think most are like that thank god, but some are, just with any other animal.

This person's two fish are probably just genetically different and are growing at different rates. My two orandas, from the same tank, are doing the same thing.

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