Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Guest amey

Ph Problems

Recommended Posts

Guest amey

Im having problems with my PH, which is usually ok. at the moment it is around 6.0-6.2 which I know is low, thought a water change may rectify this, as my tap water was around 6.8, but it hasn't made any difference!! - I changed 25% of the water.

Im currently treating the fish for ich, and am using salt and a higher temp - could this have affected the pH?

Ive added some 'proper pH' powder as I didn't have any bicarb of soda, but Ive added it gradually, as I didn't think it'd be good for my fishes to go from such extremes as 6.2 - 7! It has climbed slightly, but not very much and so far Ive added half the packet :blink:

What can I do?

Thanks

a :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest amey

forgot to say, my other tank parameters are all fine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could try using some crushed coral to help raise your ph. Place it in a baggie in a corner or under the output of your filter. It will wear down over time and need replacing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

keep adding the packet...it should stabilize fairly soon. The crushed coral and oyster shell is a good choice (especially thye oyster shell as you can see when it is exhausted)

Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest greykmb

Baking Soda.

just mix some of your tank water with a teaspoon of baking soda in a container (I use a plastic cup). This should give you about a 0.3 to 0.5 increase in pH (depnding on tank size). Pour the resulting mixture back into the tank.

Do this everyday until you get your pH where you want it. if you are uncomfortable with that much of a pH change try using a 1/2 tsp or 1/4 tsp (commonly available measuring spoon sizes).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Q regarding adding baking soda/crushed coral/oyster shells...

I want to add one of them to increase my KH, and not my pH. My pH is around 8.0...since they are also buffers, should I expect my pH to change at all? If it gets any higher, I think I might have some problems...

I am thinking of adding the crushed coral or oyster shells to the back of my filter...so I would not have to add something new everytime I changed the water. What do you guys think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To reply to the original question...I heard that the higher the temp, the lower your pH will go. I'm not sure if that is true, just something I heard. Maybe that is why?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kevin, I wanted to tell you I am finding your posts very informative lately! Thank you for all the great information

And I was wondering, are you a chemist? You know so much about pH :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bonkers

KH has a direct bearing on your pH only insofar as there is a relationship between general hardness or GH (magnesium and calcium) KH (Carbonate hardness) and dissolved CO2 (carbon dioxide).

The more dissolved CO2 in the water the lower the pH. if you run an airline the pH will drop slightly due to the increase in carbonic acid. Look around for charts on the web.

Some buffers like baking soda work by having poor ionic bonds between molecules and when there is an increase in positively charged hydrogen ions H+ (which is the cause of acidity) the bicarbonate reacts to this by breaking its own bonds and giving its own hydroxide HO- ions(?) which bond to the H+ ions creating H2O....good old fashioned water thereby stabilizing the pH at a set point of usually around 8.3. This is dependant on the disolved CO2 in the water ....generally in the order of 2-3ppm (atmospheric content). I think that is close enough for hobbyist work :)

Now throw in fish and a biological filter and the production of nitric acid will drive the pH and KH down over time and exhaust your KH, the bigger the bioload and the faster this happens. Adding oyster shell is an excellent way to regate the effects of the nitrating process, as the acidity increases the shells dissolve releasing calcium, magnesium and some carbonates into the water but it isn't particularly fast so is reccommended for a long term approach, for keeping your KH above a sensible baseline of say 5dKH or 80-100ppm.... adding baking soda to your change water will keep on top of most situations.

Try and stay away from things like proper pH if you can help it as they have phosphates and can cause algae problems. The less you add to your water the better IMHO

No I'm not a chemist and I expect someone to correct some of what I wrote above as it's been over 23 years since I did this at school and my memory is a bit foggy.

Temperature shouldn't have any direct effect on pH it can however speed up chemical reactions which may give that appearance.

So a quick recap...to increase KH add baking soda....it will raise your pH but it won't skyrocket, it should level out at around 8.3....you can increase GH & KH with crushed oyster shell if you have a low bioload it may be all you need. Now the increase from 8-8.3 will not be a huge increase but why exactly do you think it will cause problems?

hope that helps

Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually I took a fair amount of chemistry in college, so I do understand how buffers work. I learned more than I wanted about them in school hehe

Since my pH is normally at around 8.0-8.3, I'm only worried that the crushed coral or oyster shells would increase the pH...possibly buffering at a higher pH level than what my water is at. Since the baking soda buffers around pH 8, that is fine, but I don't want to have to keep readding every time I change, as that could get expensive (and be a pain in the butt). Maybe I should start with the baking soda, to get a quick boost in my KH, and then use coral in the filter, to keep the KH the same, and then phase out the addition of baking soda over time. Not sure if that will work though. I do stay away from pH up and pH down...I heard they can cause pH swings, as they wear off. I also don't like adding too many chemicals to my tank, I think it's better to try and keep it as natural as possible. And my fish have never had a problem with the pH being around 8...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever you do pay attention for the first few months till you get a feel for the parameters, the rest will become second nature.

Kevin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...