Jump to content

Tubercles Or Ich?


Guest sguideau

Recommended Posts

Guest sguideau

New to Koko's and hope I'm posting this in the right place!

How do I tell the difference between breeding tubercles and Ich?? I noticed this morning that some of my fish have tiny white spots that look like grains of salt, on their gills. Looking up Ich and breeding tubercles, I think (I Hope!) they are breeding tubercles, because the photos I see of Ich show it on various parts of the fish, and my fish that have it, have it only on their gills. Two of the fish that have the spots I know are males; my female does not have the spots, and my largest male does not have the spots.

Should I just go ahead and treat for Ich just to be safe????

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Hi, :welcome

id say they are breeding tubercles as ich tends to start at the back end or on the fins (i think?!).. i wouldnt go ahead and treat as you are so unsure as what it is and its not healthy to treat for something thats not there!

and being it that the males you know are males have it and the female you know is female doesnt id say its 99% positive that is breeding tubercles and your fish are healthy.

maybe the largest male isnt a male?! :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Hi! Is there any way you can post some pics that show what you are seeing? It's really never good to treat something if your not sure what it is...that's like giving antibiotics to a healthy person....it can end up making them sick! :o Check out the pics on breeding on this website and let us know if they're similar looking and then maybe we can go from there! Goog Luck, and post back! :heart

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I'm pretty sure I treated my goldie with a dose of salt when all he actually had was breeding tubucles! But, as long as you don't go nuts with it, the salt is a pretty safe treatment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest sguideau

I don't have any pics nor a camera, but I'll see if I can borrow my sister's digital and try to get some pics.

My largest is definitely a male (Shubunking) and he is a beauty! I never got around to naming him, just always called him "Big Daddy" because he's the largest and most aggressive of the three. The way I figured out who was male and who was female, was: I had one 5-cent plain old pond-feeder goldfish. I put in a small pond in my backyard, and went and bought two Shubunkins, and put them in the pond.

They seemed to be enjoying each other's company, and I started feeling bad for my little guy, all alone in his bowl, so I threw him in the pond with the two bigger fish. (He was about 2-inches long at the time; the white and orange Shubunkin was about 3 inches long; and the mottled Shubunkin with black, blue, white, and orange markings was the largest at about 4-inches).

Well, pretty soon I noticed Big Daddy kept chasing the orange & white around, nuzzling the belly. This went on for days/weeks. Meanwhile, the little guy came to be called "Goldie" and grew by leaps and bounds out in the pond, and quickly grew to nearly the same size as the orange & white; and then I noticed HE was chasing her around the pond, too, nuzzling her belly.

I looked up the behavior on the 'net, and learned that was breeding behavior, so I figured out I had one female and two males. By the end of the summer I was so in love with these fish that I couldn't bear to leave them outside for the winter, so I got a Rubbermaid box and fished them out of the pond and brought the inside. Discovered that they had, indeed had babies, and three survived: one Shubunkin, and two silver-toned fish.

Got on the 'net again, and found some website that explained that when two Shubunkins breed, they'll have Shubunkin babies. But when a plain old goldfish breeds with a Shubunkin, their babies will be plain silver and will be unable to reproduce as they are infertile.

Anyone know if this is true? Two of the fish with these white bumps on their gills are last year's silver babies!

So my three original fish -- Big Daddy, Goldie, and Mama -- as well as their three surviving babies spent the winter inside and all six went outside to the pond for the summer, where Big Daddy and Goldie and Mama managed between the three of them, to have 5 different sets of offspring.

Re Salt: what kind of salt in a freshwater aquarium? Why? When? How much?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

HI and welcome to the forum, the people here are very helpful.

All your goldfish should be able to breed and produce fertile offspring because they are all the same species of carp.

Salt you'd want non-iodized salt.

Why- To remove some parasites although many parasites these days are salt resistant

When-If they do have ich

How much- Beats me...Well actually i think i kno i just am not sure cause this site told me this much and this book told me this much...soo i just haven't been using salt :)

Good luck borrowing your sis's camera (mine never lets me do that LOL so i had to go buy my own lol but then again i'm 14 and she is 16)

andy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Hi, and welcome! GFandy is right, all goldfish are the same species, a bit like breeds of dogs can produce bitzers who are perfectly fertile. What you are decribing does sound like breeding tubercles. Has the temperature of their water increased recently? -Have you just brought them inside for winter? (not sure which part of the world you're from, for instance, if it's spring the temps getting warmer =>will trigger breeding behaviour. ditto if you've brought them inside a warm house to keep em out of the cold winter weather.) -Also, if you've been doing big water changes, along with increasing water temps can trigger breeding behaviour (tubercles). You mentioned your big male hasn't got his tubercles, -perhaps a female, or it could be that he's still pretty young, I've found that my younger males lose their tubercles when it's off breeding season, get them a little later than more mature fish, maybe he's a late bloomer?

As for the salt, it's a great treatment for ich, raise the salt levels up to 0.3% by adding 0.1% at a time... also, raising the temperature will increase the life-cycle of the ich, which you want as the only time the salt will kill them is when they burst out of the cysts (white dots). The salt is also pretty harmless to fish (as long as you raise the water concentration slowly), although of course, you don't want to add too much, :lol: . Hope this helps...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...