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Beginning To Have Back Problems


Guest ElenasALH

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Guest ElenasALH

It has been almost 12 yrs. since I've been cleaning fish tanks. Right now, I have 55, 29, 20, and (3) 10 gallon fish tanks. My usual cleaning routine for these fish tanks is vacuuming the dirty water out and refilling the tanks with buckets of water treated with a conditioner. I just wanted to know if there is an easier way to clean the fish tanks, rather than just carrying buckets of water back and forth? The reason I am asking this is because I am beginning to experience a lot of back pain.

Thank you

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  • Regular Member

Yes, there is a far easier way of doing it...

...hire a domestic helper!!! :D:D

Sorry, I couldn't resist. I don't trust my helpers to take care of my fish!! Not that she'll do anything intentional, but accidents do happen.

What you could do is get a hose long enough to reach a drain/toilet so that you siphon directly to it. The filling can be done with a hose, tap to tank. Before you add tap water, just turn off filtration and add enough water conditioner/buffer to treat the whole tank.

Slugger :)

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Yep the buckets have got to go with that many tanks! :o

I do pretty much what slugger suggested, I got a hose pipe and cut a piece long enough so that I attach it to my gravel vac and let it go out the sliding glass door (near my tank) and into the grass. I went to Home Depot and got a fitting (less than $3) so that I could hook the end of the hose pipe that has the threads to hook up to my kitchen sink and I refill the tank that way. I add enough Prime declhor for the entire tank volume and all is good. I only do the bucket method now for my son's 10 gallon because his room is further away and 1 bucket doesn't hurt me....but trying to clean my 75 gallon that way... :no:

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Guest ElenasALH

Umm, ok... I have a question. So when adding water back to the fish tank, do you add the dechlorinator after filling back the fish tank's water volume? Because I thought that you needed to add the dechlorinator in a bucket of water before adding it to the fish tank.

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I've seen another thread on this very topic before: adding dechlorinator for the whole tank volume or just the amount exchanged. I don't think there was a conclusive answer. I think it may depend on the product you're using too. Some people said to add enough for the whole tank volume just to be safe while others said they've been adding just enough for the amount exchanged for years and never had any problem.

I guess it's up to you. :krazy:

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One way to alleviate some of the lugging is to obtain a 1 gallon water jug and cut the top off. I use the jug to scoop the new water out of the bucket and pour it into the tank. I figure that if the water jug is clean enough to contain drinking water, then it must be clean enough to transfer tank water. Now granted I don't have anywhere's near the amount of water you do but I find this easier than trying to bucket brigade to the tank.

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I remember reading the debate on how much dechlor to add too and since I use Prime and they suggest for the whole tank volume, that's what I do. A little bit of Prime goes a long way so it still last a long time. I take out my water with the gravel vac, finish any cleaning and arranging then I add the Prime and then fill the water. Prime also works instantly and my fish have been just fine since I have used this method for a months now. :)

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Guest heyboova

how much prime do you add?

i have some coming in the mail,

right now i use start right, or something along those lines,

and you have to add one cap for every 10 gallons,

it goes pretty quick,

i cant imagine how much i'd go through if i added for the whole tank,

i imagine prime is more concentrated

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Guest mickey85
use your legs not ur back

390198[/snapback]

I have a herniated disk in my back, so doing water changes and such is really hard for me. When you have a herniated disk, whatever you do hurts - you can't sit down for more than 10 minutes at a time, driving for a long time hurts, lifting anything (regardless of how you lift it) hurts...when I hurt my back, a lot of the things I loved to do were gone to me, and other things had to be changed so I could manage them. For instance, I had to figure out how a shower hose (that slips over the nozzle) would work on a sink for water changes here at school. I had to figure out a comfortable way to work on cars, and even had to buy an ergonomic creeper ($400 vs. $150 for a normal one) so I could lay under the car. Just lifting with my legs doesn't help.

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Buckets on wheels.... submerible pumps...... pythons....... did I add dechlor???....... is this new water or old???......... lifting with the knees (thnx, jimmy :lol: ).......... waterchanges just plain suck. Especially with multiple tanks. :crp

http://www.pythonproducts.com/nospill.htm Pythons are the way to go if you have large tanks and lifting 5 gallon buckets, repeatedly, is becoming too much. You can get them for about as long as you need them. You can drain the water from the tank, into a drain of a sink, and fill it back up with the same hose.

As I understand it, the reason why you are suppose to add the amount of dechlor for the entire gallonage of your tank, when doing a waterchange with a python, is because there are already components in your tankwater that the dechlor (usually, sodium thiosulfate) will counteract with. This will expend some of the dechlor and the remaining dechlor can treat the water coursing back in.

Hope this helps!

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Guest alexis421

Hi there! I was also wondering about this. I just got Prime and didn't know how much to put in my 20 gallon tank. I second Toothless, I think Pythons will be your new friend. :D

One question though, do you guys take out the fish when you put in new tap water without water conditioner? It won't hurt them? :huh: Oops, that's 2 questions. Sorry! :D

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Guest mickey85
Hi there! I was also wondering about this. I just got Prime and didn't know how much to put in my 20 gallon tank. I second Toothless, I think Pythons will be your new friend. :D

One question though, do you guys take out the fish when you put in new tap water without water conditioner?  It won't hurt them? :huh: Oops, that's 2 questions. Sorry! :D

391246[/snapback]

My water changes are rather small (20%ish per week) so I don't worry too much about chlorine, but I do add enough dechlor to do the new water.

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As far as taking the fish out when adding tap water--I don't take them out. I jsut add the water conditioner to the water as I am filling the tank with my Python. The water conditioners supposed work instantly to remove chlorine. Just make sure the water is about the same temp as tank.

I was a little worried when I started adding water directly to the tank instead of aging it in a bucket, but like you was very tired of lugging several 5 gallon buckets aroung. So I went for it . . . . and I will never go back to lugging buckets!! The Python is great and my fish have been fine with the water.

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No, I don't take my fish out either and everybody's fine :D

As for how much Prime, it will say the correct dosage on the bottle...depends on the tank size. Some of the smaller bottles have a drop type top and that says 2 drops per gallon, then some of the larger bottles you go by capfuls. My 75 gallon takes 1 1/2 caps (of my bottle cap size) but I put 2 just to be on the safer side ( and according to the seachem prime website, you could add more safely...you should visit there site and read up on it, interesting). HTH! :)

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about getting the fish outta the tank when changing water, i think it depends greatly on the shape of the tank. I got a tall octagonal tank and have to take the fish out, otherwise they'll be in for a rollercoaster ride when i put the new water in :D .

and i always put as much stress coat as needed for the new water.

and yeah i'm also going back & forth with 3 gallon bucket in each hand :lol: lucky i'm still young, i view it as an exercise ;) dunno what it'll do to my long term health though :rolleyes:

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Hmm... Could you put your tanks on a cart or something with wheels?

(for example, I have some utility trolleys that can handle serious weight, have locking wheels, and don't look too bad http://www.containerstore.com/browse/index.jhtml?CATID=13378 - something similiar would work as long as it could take the weight).

Then you could simply roll the tank to the sink. If it is on the cart, then you still have enough gravity for siphoning, too but you would still have to pick upt he buckets - unless you used a Python or a similar DIY - or an electric gravel vac. I hope you can find a good solution soon and that you feel better! :heart

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