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Fish Floating After He Eats...


onefish3

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It's been going on awhile, and I believe it was probably caused by me cycling the tank with his buddy Eli. Eli has the problem too, but not to the extent that Linus does. Linus is to the point where he has to lay on his side at the top of the tank instead of just staying at the top upright. However, Eli now does some kind of vertical spin, which I know isn't a good sign.

Nitrates:10

Nitrites:0

ammonia:0

pH:7.8

I do about a 5 gal water change once a week, and the tank is 20 gal.

The filter is a Whisper filter meant for a tank up to 40 gal (I think).

Oh, and lately I've caught Linus hanging out at the bottom when doesn't have the floating problem. Not all the time, just some.

pH f/ the tap: 6.4

Please let me know if there's anything else you need.

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Guest Sacreligioushippie

Its after he eats? Do you soak the food? It sounds like swimbladder to me. Try soaking the food in tank water first.

As far as staying on the bottom, I'm not quite sure. I know my fantail, Po, stays on the bottom of the tank if the temperature gets too high, 76 or so.

Some fish also choose to sleep/rest on the bottom where there might not be as much of a current.

~ Jessica

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I soak the fish flakes that float (OSI brand) and swish the ones that don't underwater (Wardley brand). Linus' floating is better when I feed peas, Eli acts like he doesn't even have a problem. Gideon, the third fish in the tank, has never shown any floating problem, but he was also added at the end of the cycle.

Today they are both pretty bad. THey're both floating at the top on their sides, although Eli seems to have more energy. Hopefully the problem will correct itself by nightfall like it usually does. I just wish it would go away for good, or would lessen.

According to the thermometer in the tank the water stays at about 70.

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A pH of 6.4 is pretty low - quite acid. It would probably be a good idea if you could see if you could amend this slowly to a greater amount.

Do you know what your gH or kH is?

Feeding a higher percentage of green material in the diet could help a lot in avoiding the floating issues. You might even want to look into a sinking pellet for the rest of the food. Anytime I can avoid a fish eating at the surface, I do.

I believe that many fish can have physical damage done during cycling. Being exposed to high levels of ammonia and nitrites can adversely affect the fish for months, years or a lifetime, making them more sucesptible to floating. With careful management of water parameters and loads of green material in the diet, many of the problems can be eased or eliminated.

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Guest Morten33

Sounds like SBD (Swim Bladder Disease) Sometimes fish can live with this if you change their diet. I had a fish that had this pretty bad. This is what i did. I ordered Pro-Gold food. They are pellets that I soaked for a minute or two before feeding. They sink to the bottom, this way the fish don't gasp a lot of air when feeding. I ordered this online, not too expensive....I think 7 or 8 bucks for a small sack of it, which has lased me for about 5 months now and I am only 1/2 way threw the bag. I also feed pees every 2 or 3 days. The peas do help keep them regular. Also determine how much you are feeding, sometimes if I fed to much my fish would float. I would fast them for 3 days...this is hard to do because you feel like you are STARVING them and most fish are little piglets so they don't like this. But this will help them I promise; and after the 3 days feed JUST peas for 3 days. Then start adding in the regular food (either the flakes or Pro-gold). Then just feed peas every 2 or 3 days, see if this helps. Good luck!

Emily

PS

Sometimes fish end up dieing from this. There isn't anything you can do but try and change the diet. Don't feel bad if this happends.

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The tap's pH is 6.4, the tank's ph is 7.8 (I raise it with crushed coral).

I'd considered maybe a higher quality food would help with the floating; that's why I got the OSI. Little did I know it would float worse than the Wardley's!

I will definitely give pellet food a shot.

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Thanks Morten. I don't know why I didn't see your post when I posted mine; maybe it was too close to my bedtime. :zz

I am going to try some Hikari pellets first, because I can get those in my area, and I've heard they're a high quality fish food.

If there's any reason anyone thinks I should not use Hikari, please let me know SOON!

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