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Eheim Canister Filter


d_golem

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  • Regular Member

no i don't have one :D but i just had an interesting discussion with one of the staff in my LFS. i saw this eheim canister filter (i think the code is 2213) and looked at the turnover rate which is 440 litre/h. it also says that it's suitable to use for tanks up to 250 litre.

well me being educated in this forum my knowledge is that gf tanks need a turnover rate for filters at least 10x the tank size eg. 1000 litre/h for a 100 litre tank. i mentioned that to the guy, and he said that rule is for internal & smaller filters only.

he said in internal & HOB filters the surface area for beneficial bacteria to grow is small, meaning smaller number of bacteria breaking down harmful substances, hence the water need to be pumped quick & fast resulting in the big turnover rate, while in eheim filters there's a lot more surface area for the bacteria to grow and there are layer upon layers of filtration, so it doesn't need a big turnover rate because the greater number of bacteria is breaking down harmful substances much more efficiently compared to internal & HOB filters.

it does make sense for me, but im asking u guys about this for second opinion so i dont get lost :lol:

btw the guy showed me this huge display tank (i'm guessing about 600-700 litre) with pacus, huge plecos, and shovelnosed catfish, the water is very clear. then he showed me the single eheim filter (but a lot bigger than the one i mentioned above, im guessing 2228 professionel) used for the filtration. the same setup is used for another display tank full of cichlids.

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Your LFS guy is absolutely right. Eheim canister filters are very well designed and have lots of space for colonization of beneficial bacters. But, and I stress this, there is no formula to go by. Since every tank and its inhabitants are different, so are the filtration needs.

I, myself, do not recommend going any lower than 60-75% of the suggested flowrate for power filters. In following that advice, you would provide 60-75gph for every ten gallons of water. Any slower a flow and you risk bio-filtration failure.

There are ways to help increase the bio-filtration rate of tanks using canister filters. You can hook the canister filter up to an undergravel filter in the tank and boost the removal of ammonia and nitrItes considerably. Alternately, a sponge prefilter on the intake of the canister filter will not only remove most of the big chunks of whater in the water column, it will serve as extra beneficial bacteria beds.

As I said earlier, canister filters are not a science. That is, unless you calculate everything down to minute details that will quickly bore anyone to death. Stuff like the bio-mass of the fish, amount of food and its total possible ammonia output, flow rate of filters, square inches of colonized media in the filters and a few other details are included in the formula for having enough bio-filtration. Unless you majored in biologyand specialized in aquatic environments, this could become a daunting task.

Just remember that the flowrates for HOB filters also help to keept the water in the tank circulating enough to keep 02 levels high. It also helps to keep mulm from settling into the gravel. Not to mention that currents created help to grow strong, healthy fish. So, there are other factors that flowrates dictate...........

So, in short, I cannot recommend going any less than 60-75% of the suggsted flowrate of HOB filters. ;)

hope this helps!

Paul

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  • Regular Member

wow thx for the answer toothless :lol: just some more questions to clarify things then:

so following ur 60-75% flowrate rule, say if i have a 125 litre tank then i have to get a filter that have a flowrate of at very least 750 litre/h then?

i suppose i can use canister filter in conjuction with an internal or HOB filter to increase the water current & aeration of the tank then? not to mention the added filtration also.

cheers mate

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Guest cshepard

I've had an Eheim 2028 Pro II (277 gph) for a few years now on a 120 g tank. The company rates it for a 158g. I asked the same question to the Eheim Co., the technicians at Big Al's and some other forums, and the answer they all gave is that because of the effieciency of the cannister (ALL water flows thru the media, there is none going around as happens with some other types) and the volume of media that the 10 X rule does not apply.

I've never had a problem with filtration, I do have a pre-filter sponge, the water stays crystal clean and the fish healthy. And the 2028 is so silent you cannot even tell it's running even if you put your ear right next to it!

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Well, as I stated before, there is no real formula for canister filtration. Especially when you are dealing with goldfish. Bio-filtration needs are strictly dictated by the size of the fish and the gollonage water column the fish are living in. If your tank is maxed out on goldfish, one per ten gallons of water, then I wouldn't go any less than what I suggested earlier. However, less goldfish equals less bio-mass equals less bio-filtration needs.

So, Its basically what works for the given circumstances, really. I believe its better to provide too much than too little. That is why I suggest that providing at least 60% of the suggested rule of thumb for HOB filters, should be strived for. It makes for far less heartache down the road if theres just too much fish, or feed for the filter to handle. ;)

Rest assured, you'll know if you need more bio-filtration if your nitrItes never drop to 0ppm. Ultimately, testing will reveal all.........

Paul

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Yeah, I totally agree. It'll depend on stocking levels/fish type and tank/filter maintenance regime.

Toothless has hit the nail right on the head with the testing. :) You water parameters will tell you if you have enough filtration.

Slugger :)

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