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Goldfish Is Turning Yellow


Guest Pahwanga

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Guest Pahwanga

Could someone please help? I just got a pearl scale gold fish 2 days ago, it's living in a 3 gallon tank. I noticed lastnight that it was starting to turn yellow. I haven't tested the water. The tank is set up with a filter although I'm not sure if it's doing a very good job. there is also two live plants in the tank.

if anyone has any ideas of what I should do I would really appreciate it.

thanks.

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  • Regular Member

HI and welcome to the site. The first thing I will start with is your tank is too small to keep a gf in and keep it healthy. Fancy gf need 10 gals of water each. They are messy and produce alot of waste which in turn makes them sick. So I would suggest a bigger tank or you will have alot of problems.

Next is you need to test the water and provide us with all the information asked above, this is a must for us to know what is going on and help you with it.

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Hi there. :)

I just wanted to add a few thoughts:

I am going to assume that you don't know anything about the nitrification cycle(link) of an aquarium. Upon reading hte link I provided, you will see that you need to get yourself some test kits (ammonia, nitrIte, nitrAte, pH). You will need to use these test kits every day until the tank you are cycle has allowed the ammonia and nitrItes to drop to 0ppm.

But, you should search out a larger tank first. As Laurie statedd, goldfish get pretty large and create quite a bit of ammonia and poo. A small tank with a small filter cannot keep up with the level they put out and the toxins ammonia and nitrItes will rise to very harmful levels. Keeping your goldfish from these dangerous levels involves a bit of a formula when you are dealing with one or two fish in a tank. The formula is as follows:

Fancy goldfish need at least ten gallons per fish provided for them. Each ten gallons of water needs at least 100 gallons per hour (GPH) in filtration flow rate (for most canister and HOB filter users). In addition to the filtration described above, added aeration should also be provided. This can be an airpump/airstone combo or a venturi valve aerator connected to the outflow of a canister.

So, I think you can see that to keep your goldfish happy and healthy, and live to its full life expectancy, you should be looking to upgrade your system very soon. But, for now, we need a bit more info on your situation to get help you keep your goldfish out of harms way. I imagie the water is getting toxic right about now.

Until you post back, I suggest you do a very large waterchange with temperature matched dechlorinated water. 75% should be fine for now, but more will need to be changed within a day.

so, answer all of the questions from the white box above, plus this one:

What is the name brand and model of filtration you have on your tank?

Post back soon.

Paul

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Guest Pahwanga

thank you for you suggestions. I had no idea that my fish required so much space. I wish the petstore had've told me this. Anyway, I will definitley upgrade as soon as I possibly can. I wish I could go out and buy everything I need right now but it's sunday and all the stores are closed. It will have to wait until tomorrow. I already changed the water once lastnight because it was looking rather cloudy. I changed about a 1/3 of the tank water.

As for the filter it's an elite mini A-130. I hope that's enough information.

I won't be able to answer the other questions until I get something to test the tank water with. I should have those answers for you tomorrow.

I think I'll go and find some batteries for my digital camera so I can show you a few other concerns I have involving his eyes.

thank you so much!

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Thats great! your goldfish is going to love you for this. Really. You get her past the cycling phase of the new tank and she will bloom into a beautiful fish for you. :D

The elite a-130 only pushes 26 gallons per hour. this is waaaay too small a filter to use on a larger tank. But, it can still be used in addition to another filter. If you are going with a ten gallon tank, then you would only need between 70 and 100 gph for added filtration, if you plan on still using the internal filter as well.

Definitely do a larger waterchange immediately. Go ahead and do a 75-100% change. You want to get her away from any possible ammonia building up ASAP. You wont do any harm to the cycling process, or her, by doing this.

Follow the directions in the link above and you will be doing pretty much all that you can for her. It takes a while to establish the bio-filter but once its done, the regular maintenence becomes a weekly chore, not every day. So, you get to sit back and enjoy your goldfish instead of running around like a madwoman testing and changing everyday..... :rolleyes:

Good luck and let us know how its going. remember, if you have ANY questions about anything, just ask away.

Paul

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Guest Pahwanga

Hi it's me again. I was just wondering if it would be okay to leave my baby pearl scale in the 3 gallon tank atleast until it cycles and until I can get the larger tank cycled. I was also wondering what fish would be best to cycle the tank with. Some one told me a Betta was a good fish to use.

anyway, thank you so much for all your help. thank goodness for the internet.

P.S

he's also been gasping at the surface constantly but not only at the surface. He's always swimming around so fast, darting here and there. He's really got me worried. I want my fish to LIVE!

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Have you done a waterchange?

In only 3 gallon your amonia can get toxic within 24 hours...even 12 hours.

Id sugest a major waterchange..and untill you get him in a larger tank you are going to have to do them everyday.

Do you have an airstone in there? gasping at the surface could be a sign he needs oxygen.

Also..if he is swimming around eraticly, darting about that also may signify the amonia has risen and is toxic...he is stressed and uncomfortable....again waterchange.

Its hard to guess without water params so do the water changes to be on the safe side till you can get some test kits...in that small amount of water you will need them

My fish was in 6 gal and his amonia went toxic in 24 hours!

If you cant get a test kit take a sample to your pet/fish store and ask them to test it, its free! and get them to write down the results/numbers (not just tell you its ok or not ok)

That will help us alot to see whats hapening to his water.

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Its Ok Luvmuhfred, I got this one. ;)

Okay, heres what you have to do to keep him alive throughout this very precarious time:

Go and get test kits ASAP. Test daily and perform waterchanges as per the instruction on the cycling page that I linked you to. Raise the salinity to 0.3% as per the instructions on the cycling page as well. Do this as soon as you can, seriously, there is no time to waste here.

If the pearl scale is less than 3 inches long (including tail), then yes, go ahead and cycle the tank he is in with him in it, but you HAVE to have test kits, pronto. Your tank has enough filtration rate per gallonage to successfully cycle. But, since the gallonage is sooo low, this means that toxicity (ammonia and nitrItes climbing) will happen VERY fast. So, you will have to test TWICE a day and perform waterchanges TWICE a day. This is as apposed to performing tests and waterchanges once a day with a ten gallon tank and proper filtration. So, I think you can see that it would be better to cycle in a ten gallon. But if you cant quite get the tank and filter yet, The small tank will have to do.

For now, I very highly suggest that you start doing a 50-75% waterchange twice a day (morning and night), without fail, until you have those test kits.

It is highly probable that your fish has brought in some parasites with him. the salt level I suggested above will take care of most parasites, help raise the dissolved 02 levels in the water AND help protect from nitrIte poisoning (brown blood disease). This is going to be a MUST along with the test kits and waterchanges.

Post back soon.

Paul

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Guest Pahwanga

Ammonia level: 0

Nitrite: 0.1

PH: 7.2

These are some of test results I got. that's all I'm able to test for now with the master test kit I bought this evening. I tested for other things too, like with the KH and the GH but I'm not sure if you need to know that. If there's anything else that you really need please tell me. I have been changing large amounts of the tank water with temperature matching conditioned water. He actually seems to be doing much better.

Is it normal for him to open and close his mouth constantly all the time? he isn't gasping at the surface as much right now, he seems to only do that right after a water change.

How should I add the salt to the tank? and how much how often? I would also like to know if it's necessary to change the water tonight even if the test results are ok.

Once again thanks so much, you have been extremely helpful.

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Awesome, your water params look great, for what we have results for. :)

Read through this link for spot on directions for going through this with a new fish and new tank: http://www.kokosgoldfish.com/cycle.html Adding salt, waterchanges, testing and more are explained therein. Follow it to a "T" and youll be doing all you can. ;) There is even a link at the bottom of the cycling page that explains, in great detail, ways to cycle your tank without fish. Its easy, and quicker because waterchanges arent needed nearly as much during the process.

Well, it seems that you have indeed been keeping his water clean. Good, keep it up and22 come through this just fine.

It would help greatly if we could get results for everything you have tet kits for, from your tapwater source. No need to dechlorinate either. Post us the results from the tapwater and we can decipher if your minucipal water supply is good enough, as is, for goldfish.

Good luck!

Paul

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What sort of salts do you have? does the packet give you any instructions?

It's usually 1 teaspoon per 5gal.

As for your fish opening and closing its mouth, as long as it doesn't look loboured by doing so, that's normal to breath they suck oxygenated water through their mouths and push it past their gills where gas (oxygen) transfer occurs, it's like us breathing, if it looks like it's gasping that's not normal, it could mean many things like lack of oxygen in the water, or gill problems (can be caused by lots of different things, some worse than others). If your fish has stopped gasping at the surface of the water since you did water changes, one could assume that the water had high ammonia/nitraIte levels and that this was causing your fish to gasp by irritating/burning its gills.

It's good that you've reduced your ammonia to 0 and that your nitrItes are pretty low, but eventually you should have 0 for both, the fact you have nitrItes means that your tank is still cycling, it can take several weeks. During this time you'll have to be very vigilant and watch the Ammonia and NitrIte levels very closely, and yeah, as Toothless and LaurieP said, HEAPS of water changes and get yourself a bigger tank!

I hate the way so many petstores don't understand about proper goldfish care and are just out to make a buck or two with inadequate housing for these little guys, I'm sorry you were suckered in to this, I hope you aren't turned off goldfish keeping now you know how much is involved! It really is a rewarding hobby and keeping happy healthy goldfish I reckon is one of the most rewarding things someone can do! I used to work in an aquarium and I lost heaps of sales because I refused point-blank to sell people a goldfish in a bowl (or too small a tank), but for every 10 or so people I turned away I'd get one person who would buy an adequate sized tank for their new pets, so my bosses didn't get too pooped off, and I saved a whole lot of goldies from doom and gloom.

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Guest Pahwanga

OKay, I would really love to add some salt now. the problem is that I didn't buy any aquarium salt. does it really have to be aquarium salt, or would it be okay to just use regular salt? if it's not okay to use regular salt then goldie is just going to have to wait until I can go get some.

I agree Tosakin, it's not fair to the fish owner or the fish itself. I really wish that they had told me the 3 gallon was not big enough, i never would have bought the little goldfish aquarium kit if I had known that. now it's just a waste of 80 dollars since I'm going to have to go buy an entirely new tank and equipment. Oh well, whats done is done.

Thank you toothless and everyone else!

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No disrespect or jabs here, but:

Because this fish is new, has not been scraped and examined under a scope, you HAVE to assume that parasite are most likely there. So, That i why I believe the salt level should be brought up to a much higher level than 1 teaspoon per 5 gallons. Besides, the standard solution for guarding against nitrIte poisonings is somewhere around 0.1%. One teaspoon per 5 gallons would only reap you a % of much less then 0.25% (if my rough estimation is correct). I dont believe I have ever heard of a parasite that is succeptable to such a trivial % of salt.

Its much better to be safe than sorry. This cycling of the tank should also include quarentine procedure with a blanket treatment of 0.3% salt solution for the entire duration of the cycling phase, or one month, wichever is longer. Local fish shops tanks are usually laden with many different parasites. Namely Ich, flukes and fishlice/anchor worm.

But, this is just my opinion, really. Safety is the best bet in my book.

Paul :)

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Guest Pahwanga

Oh my gosh... that's gross.

I don't get it either.. the tank the pearlscales were in was about a 40 gallon and there were Atleast! 20 goldfish in there. Is it okay for them to keep so many in one tank? they were only a little over an inch long though.

I'm assuming that regular salt is not a suitable subsitute considering no one told me so. That's okay, I'll be able to get the aquarium salt no problem.

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Guest Pahwanga

Well, I tested the water again this morning, and they were pretty well the same. The ammonia and nitrites had gone up hardly at all. I changed the water 50% anyway. I also added salt. He seems to be doing really well and isn't gasping as much. I over fed him this morning though when my son threw a handful of flakes into the tank when I had my back turned. I fished some of them out, but it was already too late. I hope he'll be okay.

I was also wondering if it would be alright to only test for ammonia and nitrites, is ph really necessary to test that often?

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Glad to hear Paul has you on track.

Make sure to watch the params with the overfeeding, that can cause havoc on the cycle.

I would test for the PH as well as the others. PH can be a pain to control and as the tank cycles it can change. Dealing with PH issues can be more tricky than ammonia and such.

It would be a good idea to post the params and let's see where they are at.

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The only salt you should use is aquarium salt, really. the directions for maintaining salinities in the water pertain to a grade of salt that aquarium salt comes in. Too small a grade and you will be using too much, too large and youll be using too little. But, if you can find a similar grade of 100% pure sodium hydrochloride, then bay all means, use it if its cheaper. But, they must be similar grade to Aquasalt.

My reason for asking you to test your tapwater for everything you have kits for its to make sure that pH will not become a problem. I will explain more after we have the results.

There is no way for an aquarium shop to properly stock their tanks, and still expect to make any money. Luckily, many shops have a very large, out of sight, filtration system that controls the water quality of most or all of thier tanks. If you were to take a peep behind the scenes at the filter, you wouldn't even recognize it. ;) However, this does not mean that ALL shops are equal. I think that very soon, you will be able to scrutinize each and every shop you enter and be able to tell if they are a good shop, that cares about the fish, or not.

Good luck and keep up the good work! :D

Paul

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