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Prime Declorinator?


fondoo

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According to the directions on the bottle, you should add 10 milliliters per US gallon. But, this is for standard dechlorination. If you are wanting to use prime for its benefits for cycling or to keep an uncycled bin free of harmful ammonia, you should dose as per the results on your test kits and the directions on the back of the bottle of Prime.

However, since it is so safe to use, I choose to double dose every gallon of water I add to my tanks during regularly scheduled waterchanges. Unless I change more than 50%. Then, I only dose 1 1/2 the suggested dosage. My reasoning is that even if there is no measurable ammnia or nitrItes, it will go ahead and detoxify nitrAtes.

Altogether, if you stick to the suggestions on the bottle, you should be fine. But, try not to exceed the regime I use on my tanks.

Hope this helps! :)

Paul

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Amquel and amquel plus are both safe to use at double strength. But, be very wary that the two are very different in their ingredients. Amquel plus utilized sodium thiosulfate (like Prime). Amquel (plain) is something different and is probably best to use it according to the directions.

Hope this helps!

Paul

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I bought a huge bottle of it and I didn't know how concentrated it was! I change about three gallons a week on my ten gallon, and even less on my betta tank. I tried a few different things, but I ended up buying a small bottle ot prime too. The smaller had instructions of "2 drops per gallon" and that was so much easier. I still have my big bottle, and when I run out of the little bottle I plan to just refil it :)

This might help with dosing, it might not. I wanted to share a little bit and maybe help some others too :)

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I usually have the bucket(s) of clean water out for at least a day, but its mostly because the water that comes out of the faucet is water is much hotter than room temp :)

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While there is no precise time span that prime does its thing, Tapwater is considered to be ready to use immediately after adding Prime. I have been doing waterchanges with it for over two years now. I just draw the water, add the Prime and stir for a second or two. Then I pour it right in. ;)

Hope this helps! :)

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I use Prime and I do not age the water - I can't - have no where to put it! Kitty would just drink it! I might look into Amquel Plus becasue it has a samll affect on lowering the pH out of the tap (so I have read) but then again, Prime is working just fine for me so why risk upset by changing, right?

Hey - you are in NY - you got the best tap water in the world! :exactly

PS - I double dose it but that's becasue we have the worst tap water in the world where I am now (I am from NYC) - it's not fit for people! :ill I STILL worry about using it... I may switch back to spring water despite the cost.

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According to the directions on the bottle, you should add 10 milliliters per US gallon. But, this is for standard dechlorination.

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Paul, can you elaborate on your directions for me....I just started using Prime a week ago. I am a new user....10 gallon tank, 4 wks old. When I read the directions for Prime on it's website, they say 5ml per 50 US gallons. Which would equate to 1 ml per 10 US gallons. Am I right? I am confused....pls help! :)

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Your absolutely correct. :D

Sorry about that. It was a typo. I use small, tuberculin syringes for dosing liquids. When using them, 100 units equals 1cc or 1ml. So, 10 units per gallon would be one double dose of Prime.

Paul

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I'm not sure..Probably not by accident because the directions say you can use 5 times the amount if its needed. I don't think there are really any negative effects except an empty wallet. Maybe Toothless can help on this one tho.

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Well, considering that I have been double dosing with prime for two years and have had no adverse reactions, then I would say that overdosing with prime would be due to gross negligence. Basically, you can overdose Prime if you were to ignore the directions and just start dumping it in there.

My suggestion is that if you stick to somewhere between a full dose and a double dose, your aquatic animals will be fine.

I have never had any adverse reactions with double dosing with the following aquatic animals; fish, fiddler crabs, shrimp, snails turtles, clams, plants and even microfauna like ciliated protozoans. Not a single hitch.

However (isn't there always a "however" :rolleyes: ), it would actually be wise to find out what your local water chemistry is comprised of. Requesting a copy of your waters breakdown HAS to be fullfilled, by law. Now, in the analysis, you will find an average for chlorine or chloramine content, as well as everything else. Well, you might find that your chlorine content is much lower than what 1 standard dose of Prime (or Amquel plus, same ingredients) detoxifies. If you were to blindly go and double dose Prime or Amquel plus in your tapwater and it has a low chlorine or chloramines count, then you would actually be overdosing by much more than double. But, there is usually always something in your tankwater for any excess Prime to bind with (ie, nitrates, copper).

My local water has a range of results from 0.72ppm to 0.93ppm. Since one dose of prime handles 4ppm chlorine, and I double dose close to 80% percent of the water I add to my tanks, then I am adding about 7-8 times more than I really need to for chlorine removal. But, like I said, there is almost always something in the water for Prime to interact with.

I can't garauntee that this will work the same for anyone else's tanks unless they had the same water I have. But I think its safe to say that its hard to overdose..... ;)

Paul

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Does it cost money to request a copy of my water chemisty? I think its a good idea.

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My water chemistry is actually online. Try to do a search on your water supplier.

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Your city publishes an annual water quality report.

http://egov.cityofchicago.org/city/webport...ecelldffhdffn.0

Looks like it gives nitrAte levels along with contaminants. It also has a phone number you can call and I'd bet they'd give you the tests we usually use in aquariums.

I need to put together info on acceptible levels of contaminants.

Here's some info fron a chemist.

The 50% kill in 48 hours for carp for chloroform (TriHaloMethanes or THMs)is 162 ppm. LC50 for copper for carp is listed in the toxicity literature at 0.14 ppm. If pH and hardness are kept high, copper is less toxic.

These are the levels as defined in the Textbook of Fish Health:

Metal Safe Limit Comments

Copper 0.014mg/l More toxic in soft water

Zinc exacerbates toxicity

Combined both are dangerous

Zinc 0.01mg/l Synergistic with copper

0.15mg/l In hard Water

Cadmium 0.03mg/l

Chromium 0.10mg/l

Lead 0.01mg/l In soft Water

4.00mg/l In hard Water

Silver 0.03mg/l

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Ours are online, too. Try looking at the Dept. of Health or the Department of Public Works for your county or state. You can usually start by going to www.yourstatename.gov. If you do not have online service, look at the water bill and call the number there - you can request a hard copy and they will mail it to you!

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DataGuru - thanks for the information. Although I do not live in metro Chicago, my water is from Lake Michigan. So as the water makes it way on down the line, it gets treated (for good or bad). My water supplier is Illinois American Water, which does have a website. And actually, we just got the report in the mail the other day, too!

My husband is a chemical engineer so he knows all about this stuff - thank goodness for him - and for you, Betty!! You are always a wonderful source of information!! Without your help, my fish would be in pretty bad shape by now!

THANKS!!! :D

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