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Green Water


jackson

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  • Regular Member

ok, its always above 30 degrees in the room due to hot weather, and it has already claimed the life of my black moore. but even with decreased bioload on the 20 gallon the water still turns green really fast

this is the 2nd time i;ve done a 100% water change AND cleaned out the tank but the green water comes back and it gets worse everytime

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well, dumping the whole thing will make it worse. I had the same problem! what you need to do is cover the tank for 3 days, so no light can get to it. that will kill off a good bunch of it. then you'll get a milky cloud, just leave it alone, and only do tiny little 1/4 water changes at max. NO MORE! the milky will work itself out.

as for the heat, freeze water bottles (or soda bottles) and float them in the tank

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Boy does that look familiar lol that's a big problem for snail tanks. From my experience/research, green water tends to happen for two reasons:

1. Excess nitrates. Check your nitrites, there is often a nitrite spike associated with it. You will detect little or no nitrate, since the algae is eating it up. Heavily planted tanks rarely have problems with greening, because the plants out-compete the single celled algae that causes the water to go green. Clogs in filtration, mini cycles, and all sorts of things that can raise nitrite & nitrate will give you green water if the conditions are right.

2. High phosphates. I never did figure this one out properly...there was a phosphate spike in my tap water at one point and poof: GREEN. I guess it's basically what happens with fertilizer runoff. I tried curing it to no effect, tried chemicals and waterchanges, water addatives, and eventually it went away on its own...the mystery remains. Never read any solutions to phophate problems.

So...unless your water tests out for beaucoup de phosphate like mine did, then it's probably the nitrates. If you read nitrites, it's a cycle issue. If there is no nitrite and water changes make it worse, then there's probably something munged up with the filtration or there are excess nitrates in the tap water. That happened to me once as well, a nitrate spike in the tap water...not fun and bad to drink.

Green water is healthy in the sense that it is keeping your fish from having to deal with excess nitrate, and I have left it in one of my tanks where I can't keep plants. It's unsightly, but can be a good buffering mechanism. However, if you have a nitrite spike going along with the green water, that's bad news...usually means the whole thing has to recycle properly and will need help from additional filtration.

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  • Regular Member
Boy does that look familiar lol that's a big problem for snail tanks. From my experience/research, green water tends to happen for two reasons:

1. Excess nitrates. Check your nitrites, there is often a nitrite spike associated with it. You will detect little or no nitrate, since the algae is eating it up. Heavily planted tanks rarely have problems with greening, because the plants out-compete the single celled algae that causes the water to go green. Clogs in filtration, mini cycles, and all sorts of things that can raise nitrite & nitrate will give you green water if the conditions are right.

2. High phosphates. I never did figure this one out properly...there was a phosphate spike in my tap water at one point and poof: GREEN. I guess it's basically what happens with fertilizer runoff. I tried curing it to no effect, tried chemicals and waterchanges, water addatives, and eventually it went away on its own...the mystery remains. Never read any solutions to phophate problems.

So...unless your water tests out for beaucoup de phosphate like mine did, then it's probably the nitrates. If you read nitrites, it's a cycle issue. If there is no nitrite and water changes make it worse, then there's probably something munged up with the filtration or there are excess nitrates in the tap water. That happened to me once as well, a nitrate spike in the tap water...not fun and bad to drink.

Green water is healthy in the sense that it is keeping your fish from having to deal with excess nitrate, and I have left it in one of my tanks where I can't keep plants. It's unsightly, but can be a good buffering mechanism. However, if you have a nitrite spike going along with the green water, that's bad news...usually means the whole thing has to recycle properly and will need help from additional filtration.

366941[/snapback]

Green water consumes ammonia not nitrate, :lol: my green water tanks don't even need filters and the ammonia alert is always yellow

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  • Regular Member

well, i thought it was the sun at first, so i curtained the window. Now the only source of light is the room's flourscent lights.

i do about a 20-30% water change every week or bi-weekly, depending on how busy i am.

i've never had this problem last summer, only this summer, and i also keep my tank empty of decorations to ease cleaning

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dr. fosters and smiths catalogue sells a product... uh ... great I knew the name of it and now I lost it! like phosphate gone or something.

I've never tried it or anything... Has anyone used this product?

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Green water consumes ammonia not nitrate,  my green water tanks don't even need filters and the ammonia alert is always yellow

I've read ammonia levels while having green water but never nitrate...nitrate was the explaination I'd always read. Perhaps it's both.

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Green water consumes ammonia not nitrate,  my green water tanks don't even need filters and the ammonia alert is always yellow

I've read ammonia levels while having green water but never nitrate...nitrate was the explaination I'd always read. Perhaps it's both.

367281[/snapback]

In my experience you can't really test green water for ammonia or nitrate unless it's with one of those ammonia charms for ammonia only, chemicals killing green water may cause the algae to release their ammonia or nitrate that was being processed

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Guest ElliotOranda

Thanks for asking about the green water. My tank resently started doing the same thing, about a week ago actually. I do water changes weekly, but last night I started to get really worried so I read your posts.

I have two tanks and only one of them is doing the green thing. So I don't think it is phosphates.

My tank stats are:

salt: 2

gh 8/146.2

nh3: 0

Ph; 7.6

Co2: 8

Nitrate: 160

Nitrite: .50

Temp: 76 degrees

30g tank w emporer 330 and 220... lost of filtration lots of aeration.

3 orandas in tank about 4 inches each

Tank has been set up for 6 months with no issues and has been cycled for quite some time.

I think something is causing a cycle issue, the fish are getting sick and Idon't know what to do. For the past two days I have done 75% water changes, and today I added amquel plus just to kill off some of the nitrates and nitrites.

Any advise would be greatly apprecitated.

:crp

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did an 80% water change cuz my grandma kept nagging about the nasty tank, i also put in some zeolite rocks, those things have worked in the past for me as forthe phosphate, the carbon should take care of that no?

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Guest jimmy_396_jimmy

umm..where exactly do you live? 30 degrees is prett cold not that hot, where i live

it's 80s and up all year round

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest easycruise

I have had the same experience. Last summer at our summer house I had murky green water problem. The "trashbag over the tank for a few days" method didn't work. I bought a diatom filter and it cleared up. Stayed clear with AlgaeFix. This year at the house, same tank, same fish, I bought a UV sterilizer and it's been great! No need for diatom filter or any algae medicine.

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  • Regular Member

After your massive water change, starve the fishies for about a week.

Do another massive water change, then only feed sparingly.

Apart from a UV for my 55g, that is how I got rid of pea soup on my 29g. It was just as bad as your tank.

Good luck.

Slugger

PS : I think that green water should help with nitrates, not ammonia. My reasoning is that it is a form of algae that uses nitrates as a source of food, right at the end of the nitrogen cycle. You would also see reduced nitrates in a planted tank.

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