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Rubbermaid "ponds"


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I was thinking about getting a tub for my fish to put outside. Could I put the tub in a hole, with a filter and heater and just leave it outside during the winter? It was suggested that we build a pond lined with cement, but I know that that would kill the fish. :angry:

Does anyone know do-it-yourself plans for an outdoor pond? Search engines aren't helping any.

:nana

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I have a 200g rubber maid on the patio. It is winter here in Aust so at night I cover the tub with a sheet of industrial strength polystyrene (3cm thick). It stops the heat dissipating overnight. We had to order the poly cut to measure from the manufacturers and it cost around A$70.

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Why not get a pond liner, and dig your own hole and line it, and fill with some rock? It doesnt get super cold here during the winter, so im not to worried about my goldies in the pond, but we have a pretty big pond.

You could bring them in in winter, but if its going to be a hassle, I would try the liners. It can be alot of work, but its worth it.

Good Luck!!

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We made a cement pond at one of our old houses a few years ago, and that worked really well. But I live in Indiana, so the winters are really iffy. The last two years we got a lot of snow and a few days it didn't go above 30 degrees. I'm just concerned about them dying when it gets cold.

:nana

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Depending on the size and shape of a cement pond, it also could be covered at night with a tarpoline.

Our nights are getting down to 0C and below. Before I started covering up the tub the water temp would fall dramatically at night then slowly climb a bit during the day.

Since covering the tub I loose no heat at night, zero, zilch, none. The temp is the same in the morning when I remove the cover so I'm pretty stable between 12-14C all winter so far.

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Most will winter over well. Providing the depth is there. We shut down waterfalls so as not to super cool, but instead run the hoses just under the surface so the water circulation is still going and also will help should the weather feeze to create a opening so the gasses don't build up but rather still have a escape. Styrofoam pads floating on the surface or some type of cover as Fishmerized suggested will also help. They should also not be feed at all under 50 *. Any fish that lay's over and gets stressed (ie: red fins) should be brought inside and warmed up slowly to a acceptable range. There's a few that just don't tolerate the colder weather outside, mostly I have seen this in koi.

Fancy goldies will not the colder weather at all.

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I too have been wondering about winter condition and putting in a pond. We are at day 2 and about 3 feet now. Living in PA we get a good bit of snow here and there. I've read (by posts here) that 3 1/2 ft deep is the minimum. If I went four feet and the top of the water froze how am I to get circulation and what not under the frozen water?

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Guest Abrienna

My dad has a decent sized pond, ~1200g~ and 3 & 1/2 feet deep at it's deepest. (There's also a shallow "shelf" area for potted plants.) He turns off his water fall and just circulates the water. He checks everyday to make sure that there is a hole in the ice. We live right on lake Ontario (In New York State, USA) so we get plenty of snow and cold temps. His fish winter well. Also, his pond is dug w/a liner.

Abrienna

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I have tubs out in the winter, but being in FLorida isn't really a state to compare it with real winter.

Just to remember, you can stick a heater into the tub, as long as the heater doesn't touch the plastic. I have mine dangling into the tub from the center of the tub, suspended by a pice of wood that runs over the center of that tub.

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Just to remember, you can stick a heater into the tub, as long as the heater doesn't touch the plastic.

Where did you find a heater for an outside tub? When I was trying to find one for my porch pond, I couldn't find one anywhere. All I could find were deicers.

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Queenie, I use the same kind of heater that the stores sell for aquariums. Here is one as an example... :)

http://bigalsonline.com/catalog/product.xm...ategory_id=2259

I have used 2 300 watt heaters for a 300 gl tub just fine - the coldest it gets here is around 25 degrees f, and I have covered the ponds with 3/4 inch styrofoam sheets from Homedepot.

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I don't mean to horn in on this thread, but if I may I'd like to ask another question. So, you completely cover the pond/tub with the styofoam sheets? To hold the heat in? Do you have air being pumped in along with the filters running? I've been wanting to set up an outdoor pond (on top of the ground) but the winters are so cold sometimes. Oftentimes gets down to 10 deg. Do you think that would work here?

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I should have mentioned that I asked about the air because it would probably have to be covered during the day as well as the night sometimes. We get snow and ice sometimes.

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