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Milton The Baby Shubie....


daryl

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A little background.... I seem to have a neon sign on my roof that states "Sucker for Fish and Cats", blinking day and night. I have had boxes of cats and kittens left multiple times here, and even a large bag with fish in it once.

Last May 22, a tiny plastic cup was left on my front porch with a teeny weeny little goldfish in it. He looks like a tiny calico shubie. My girls named him "Milton".

Milton was placed in my planted tank - to share the tank with a Siamese algae eater and various live plants, for I had no other place for him at the time. All my qt tanks were occupied. He was soooooo tiny.....

A week ago, I noticed that Milton's tail was split in the middle. He has started carrying his top fin down. He is active, alert and eats quite well. He has not grown a great deal in the past 6 weeks - but I suppose he has - since I look at him a lot it is difficult to measure that growth. He is about 2 inches long from nose to tail.

I am wondering if the Siamese Algae eater is bothering him, perhaps. He has no other physical damage other than the tail. Other than the fact that he has slightly clamped fins, he is not acting peculair in any other fashion - he does not flash or sit or float or anything.

I opened up a 10 gallon qt tank (available now), filtered with a Penquin 170, cycled. IT is a bare tank. Heat is at 78F, salted to 3% (last percent went in this morning). Ammonia -0, Nitrite , 0 Nitrate <5, pH 7.8.

He has not changed at all in the last 24 hours since the move.

Do you think that the Siamese Algae Eater was bothering him? (THe fish is a good 3 inches in length and a solid thing - he is named "Monster", and he lives up to his name, which is why is in the planted tank, normally by himself) Do you think that some disease just came from no-where after 6 weeks and got him? I can treat with a great number of other meds and such if necessary, but I thought I would see if isolation and salt cures him up.

So.....any other ideas, anyone? I really would hate to lose little Milton. He has really grown on me the last couple of months!!!!

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I agree that a .3% salt solution is the best start. How long have you been salting? I would think that a disease would make it's presence by now. It sounds like the algae eater may have been a bit territorial. Since there aren't any other signs than the split tail, I would hate to start medicating unnecessarily. I would say hold on for now and see what happens with the salt. Good luck..I hope the poor little guy gets better!

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Well, Milton has gone downhill. His fins are solidly clamped and he is not eating. I have started force feeding him a mush of MediGold. I really cannot see any reason that he is sick - no outward signs, no parasites that I can see or scrape. It is tough, though, for he is soooooo tiny.

:cry1 Poor little guy. I expect he was a carnival fishy or a feeder.... What a lousy life..... :cry1

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I was going to suggest that those first signs you mentioned could be the beginning of an internal infection but he was still eating.

Daryl, I have had several small fish from the lfs who suddenly went downhill like this, it is part of natural selection but I have managed to save a few. I suggest that you treat Milton as if you were treating dropsy. Keep up the medicated food and use an antibiotic type water treatment. Hope he pulls through for you.

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Yup - like I said, I think the word has gotten around that I will bust my budget to help various animals - my particular favorites being cats and fish. I have gotten a wide variety - from newborn fawns rolled in blankets to a litter if 9 puppies that looked like they were less than a day old.

Well, I took your advice, Annette, and started an aggressive regiment of an antibiotic water bath with force fed MediGold mush. He is at least still swimming this morning - maybe even a bit more perky this morning. He still does not look too good, but I will keep beating at it. With luck, maybe the little fellow will make it. I truly would love to see him develop into a monsterous big guy that takes over a tank!

Sigh......

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Guest Esareh

Are you 100% sure its a siamese alage eater? theres alot of imposter species that get more aggresive as they age. but, then, you probably know that allready.

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Yup - like I said, I think the word has gotten around that I will bust my budget to help various animals - my particular favorites being cats and fish. I have gotten a wide variety - from newborn fawns rolled in blankets to a litter if 9 puppies that looked like they were less than a day old.

360526[/snapback]

omg! Daryl!!

i think its really great that you will do so much to help animals. people have obviously grown to think of you as someone who will help them no matter what.

you should be incredibly proud of yourself.

why was a fawn put on your doorstep? was he injured?

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You know, Esareh, you may have hit the nail right on the head. I have often questioned as to whether Monster is a real Siamese Algae Eater or not. All my studies of pictures and such have led me to believe that he is NOT. He, too, was a "dumped" fish - a tiny little thing that was given to me by a lady who was going to flush him...... He has been isolated in a planted tank nearly all his life and would not have shared with Milton, except that Milton arrived right after I just purchased 3 new fish and had used all my iso tanks..... I am sure it was a foolish move on my part!

I do not think I should ever put any other fish in with Monster....

I suppose that Monster could have injured and stressed Milton to the degree that a opportunistic bacteria took over - hense the present problems.....

Whatever has happened, the antibacterial water treatment and MediGold seems to be helping, for Milton will now respond to a presence in front of his tank, and ate a pellet of MediGold all by himself. :D

The fawn was left, not because it was injured, but, I suspect, because someone thought it had been orphaned. Typically, a mother whitetail deer will place her newborn in some tall grass or under a bush in the shade during the day. She then goes off and grazes. She may not return to the fawn until dark - some 12 hours later. People will often mistake a fawn placed by a mother as an abandoned infant and bring them to rehab in hopes of saving them. A particularly young fawn will not even move when you touch them. They instinctually think that they are invisible if they just hold still enough, and do just that. I almost hit one with the tractor one spring - it was sitting in the long grass and did not move even when the loud mowing tractor drove nearly over it!

This particular fellow was raised on a bottle and released into the preserve. For as overpopulated as we are with deer, there seems no reason to put such a young, innocent creature to death. He was given his chance.....

By the way, my favorite deer, ScarDoe (she is well over 8 years old) has given birth to fawns again. They were gamboling in the yard this morning, early. They are so cute. They play like kittens, chasing each other up and down the lawn, bouncing and pronging all around. Such charming innocence is hard to not love.....

:)

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