Jump to content

Using A Python Vac System.


Guest daverush

Recommended Posts

Guest daverush

Hey, I've been trying to get used to my new Python Vac System but I'm not liking it very much.

First --It can be a pain to the filter off my sink. (Dont want to use tools because of baked white finish.)

Second -- You waste a ton of water while vacuuming.

Third--When Refilling it takes a while to adjust the water temp.(To hot,to cold...)

Forth--When you finally get it right you have to quickly close the bottom valve and run over to the tank and open up the valve. If you dont do this quick then such pressure builds up that leaks can start spraying from the faucet making a big mess. And sometimes when you open the valve up in the tank it can release quite a surge.

Fifth--If you do add the water directly into the tank, then you must treat for the whole 55 tank (55 gallonns in my case) Lot of chemicals.

I prefer a small hose out the door and a manual syphon start.(Easy to do)

On refill , I do a 5 gallon bucket at a time (easy to adjust temp and treat)

Also dont have to drain out and store 25 feet of hose either.

Am I missing something here or does anyone else find the same hassles?

Dave :krazy:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

i think most people overlook these little inconviences becasue of the overall wonderfull-ness of the python. I hook mine up to the utility sink in the basement so a few leaks dont matter, and when i do hook it up the kitchen, i just throw a towel over the faucet to stop any spraying water. you can slow down that surge of water by either 1) turning it on real slowly till it quits hissing at you, or 2) leavethe valve open and the end in a bucket and let it just start running till you get to it from your kitchen. i never found it hard to adjust the water temp, i know on my faucets, for instance in the basement, to put the cold water at 4 oclock and the hot water at 11 oclock ( i remember stuff like that by where they would be on a clocks face) and for getting the thingie off of your sink, try unscrewing it with rubber gloves on or one of those little grippy things for opening jars. when i store mine, i have hte 75 foot one (no sinks nearby...our house is long and skinny)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

hmmm...it ate the rest of my post. anyways, i roll it up tightly into a coil and store it under my tank with my buckets inside of the coil. it doesnt take up any extra room that way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest daverush

Christi,

Thanks for your reply.

I guess it's just individual tast

I'm still not sold on them.

Maybe i'm just lazy.

Even if I found using it to vac was good, I still don't want to put tap water directly into my tank.

And as far as getting the temp set, i've got a single lever and the slightest adjustment sends the temp flying.

Dave :crp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I've got a single lever as well & I just turn it to my usual spot for temp for my tanks & go from there. Also I put the end in the tank & hold it down with the tank lid. I then put the Prime in (I don't worry about the chemicals - Prime is so concentrated that for my large tank I only need to add a bit more than a capful to treat the entire tank. A bottle lasts me forever.) then I run to the sink & turn on the water. I haven't had any probs with my fish doing it this way.

This way I don't worry about the valve & the back pressure & the end of the python doesn't fly out of the tank when the water starts to fill. It's worked well for me for the last year (I got my python after I dumped about 15 gal of water onto my floor (& then of course it went to the ceiling below. I haven't had that sort of a problem for a while now & I can honestly ssay it really speeds up my tank changes.)

Hope this helps! :D Jenn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Hi - A suggestion for Problem No. 1 - you can put a towel or even a napkin or some sort of cloth between the basket on the faucet and the wrench - this prevents scratches. i do it al the time becasue I don't like knicks, either.

Apparently, at some supermarkets or warehouse clubs, there is a place where you can buy water and fill them up in your own large five gallon bottles. Nowhere near me has this particular great convenience, but using bottled water is very helpful and superfast! (the kind delivered to the house gets expensive, but it aslo and option if money is less of an object than convenience). Downside, more storage space just a different type and shape but also with different benefits.

You could just fill a large bucket (or five gallon bottle) with tap water, treat it with Prime or something similar, and then dump it into the tank right away! I do not think the aperture on a five gallon bottle is large enough to let chlorine "burn off" for several days - but you could do that in a bucket).

just some ideas - my place is small so these little things become a lot bigger!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest lovefish

I posted tonight on this very topic. The instructions say that because the water is being aerated in the tubing much of the chlorine is being removed. I added some water conditioners because I was a little afraid of filling the tank using the Python. I turned the water on all the way cold. My fish did great. No disturbance whatsoever. Also, they were less agitated because I was not vaccuming with the other device that uses the air pump. Much more small particulate matter was siphoned off the bottom of the aquarium floor. If the tank empties too quickly just adjust the water pressure. I loved the device and will never go back to the bucket method. :exactly

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest daverush

I here all that you all are saying.

I still think for me it better to get a syphon going out my back door.

Goes against my grain to watch as much water as your syphoning out going down the drain for no reason.

I tried filling with the python tonight and it was much easier leaving the valve open this time.

However, normal water changes for me will be around 15 gallons.

I think I will just fill three 5 gallon buckets the night before.

Maybe I'll change my mind in time but for now I want to avoid all those water treatments.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member
Goes against my grain to watch as much water as your syphoning out going down the drain for no reason.

I'm with ya on that one.....that's what has kept me from getting a python so far. I used to use the bucket method when I was just doing 10 gallons at a time, but since I got my 75 gallon, I let the old water go out the door and I refill by hooking a reg hose to my kitchen sink with a faucet adapter. It works well enough for me and I still don't have to haul the heavy buckets anymore. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...