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Clamped Fins On Bottom- Help W/ Diagn+treatm Svp


Guest nday

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Guest nday

Hello,

I'm writing because I have a fish who is sick, but I cannot tell with what. His only visible symptoms are clamped fins, sitting on the bottom, and listing to the left. He's eating less enthusiastically than usual. This is not a fish who has regular buoyancy problems, but he's either listless or strongly negatively buoyant now or both. There may be a faint whitish fringe along the edge of his dorsal fin.

He is a ~3 year-old oranda, about 4.5 inches long, not counting his tail. He is in a 20 gal. tall tank with two other goldfish: one his own size and the other about 2.5 inches long. The other large fish in the tank is having buoyancy troubles right now, but this is not that unusual for her, especially since I have salted the tank to around .3% (just under 3/4 c. for 20 gallons). The tank is filtered with a Whisper 40 backpack.

Water Conditions:

Ammonia is at 0 mg/l

NO2 (nitrite) is between .3 and .8 mg/l (closer to .3)

pH is 8.0

Tap pH is btw. 7.2 and 7.5

Temperature is currently at 76 F, but has been higher for much of the past week (summer here, no AC)

I change 50% of the water weekly, and would be doing such a water change today or tomorrow even if I hadn't checked the NO2 level.

The fish eat Hikari lionhead mini-pellets, soaked for 1-5 minutes beforehand, about 1/3-1/2 tsp (dry, pre-soaked volume) once per day.

I treated the tank with one day's worth of Maracyn and two days' worth of Maracyn-2 (one is a gram-positive antibiotic, the other is gram-negative, I forget which).

The water is treated with Stress Coat (chlorine and chloramine neutralizer, plus aloe).

thanks,

Nathan

Madison, WI

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Hi Nathen. :):welcome

Firstly, let me thank you for being so explicit in your desription of your tank and the sick one. This will help GREATLY!

Off the top, the nitrIte levels are alarmingly high. This could be one of the factors for the symptoms (or the symptoms persisting). I think a timeline as to when you treated them and when you tested positive for nitrItes would help explain a bit. Also, have you ever tested this high for nitrItes before you began any treatments?

Ok, Can you answer these questions for us:

Have you or do you ever see any flashing or scratching on the ornaments, gravel or tank sides? Any rapid fin shaking from the dorsal fins or pelvic fins?

Any rapid breathing patterns?

When you started the maracyn treatment, did you run out or something? Or are you awaiting further instruction on treatment? I would contiue with the maracyn and salting. But be extra careful as to the amount of salt you use. It cannot be filtered out nor can it evaporate so the salinity can creep to very high levels over time.

When you see this fish, or any fish list to the side like that, are the lights out in the tank and there is a light source elsewhere in the room? Fish, although they possess swim bladders, also use the strongest source of light to orient their position in the water. This is an ingrained habit from being a prey item. They are less visible from directly above them and strive to keep their backs in line with the largest source of light.

Post back soon. :)

Paul

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Guest nday

Hi all,

More info in response to Paul's questions. Today, the fish is still sitting on the bottom of the tank, though he's oriented vertically now and he's putting up his dorsal a little.

"Off the top, the nitrIte levels are alarmingly high. This could be one of the factors for the symptoms (or the symptoms persisting). I think a timeline as to when you treated them and when you tested positive for nitrItes would help explain a bit. Also, have you ever tested this high for nitrItes before you began any treatments?"

Timeline: symptoms first appeared 4 days ago. I began treatment with Maracyn-2 3 days ago. Yesterday was when I tested for nitrItes, and I did a 50% water change then.

"Ok, Can you answer these questions for us:

Have you or do you ever see any flashing or scratching on the ornaments, gravel or tank sides?"

No -- the fish is barely moving at all, in fact.

"Any rapid fin shaking from the dorsal fins or pelvic fins?"

Also no.

"Any rapid breathing patterns?"

He is breathing in a somewhat rapid or labored fashion.

"When you started the maracyn treatment, did you run out or something? Or are you awaiting further instruction on treatment?"

A little bit of both. The first 3 days of Maracyn-2 saw no improvement, and then I ran out. I decided to write here at that point so see if anyone had any thoughts (it is not easy for me to get to the fish store I use, and I want to make sure I'm doing the best things I can; I've had this fish for 2 1/2 years).

"I would contiue with the maracyn and salting. But be extra careful as to the amount of salt you use. It cannot be filtered out nor can it evaporate so the salinity can creep to very high levels over time."

I trying to keep the salt concentration around .3%; when I changed the water yesterday I was careful only to put back what I thought I had taken out.

"When you see this fish, or any fish list to the side like that, are the lights out in the tank and there is a light source elsewhere in the room?"

I don't think he is orienting his back towards the light. I will continue treating the tank with Maracyn-2 today. Should I also use an anti-parasite or anti-fungal drug also? Should I be giving the fish salt baths?

More help please! Thanks,

Nathan

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Hmmmm, :unsure:

I would continue treating but maybe try switching to maracyn 1 or treat with both.

Heat should be brought slowly up to 80-82 degrees.

Continue with salting at 0.3% but only if the nitrItes continue to be a problem. If they slack off a bit, you can slack off on the salt too. Say, .2% or so.

Increase aeration by installing a (or another) bubblewall.

If you can order some medigold from goldfish connection.com. It has a very good antibiotic ingredient and fish go for it pretty well. If medigold isnt in the picture, try to find another antibiotic food.

I am still not positive as to what the cause of this sudden crashing like this. I know that the nitrIte rise might be due to the meds but, maybe something else has happened.

Do you normally test every week for ALL of the params?

Is your whisper filter a newr model that has the sponge/bio-frame in it?

Have you recently cleaned out your filter or replaced the bio-bag completely? Did you do this shortly before the symptoms started?

Do any changes or anything to the tank recently (besides medicating).

Bascially, I just want to see if you've done anything to disrupt your bio-filter of the tank.

I suspect that you may have had a jump in your params. Usually, a fish falling ill is due to poor water quality. Even though your filter pushes the minimum amount of gph, 3 growing fish in a 20 gallon tank can eventually outdo the filter.

But then again, even the best aquarist winds up with ill fish too. :unsure:

Post back soon.

Paul

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Guest nday

I've reloaded on Maracyn-2 (minocycline, gram-negative antibiotic) and am going to stick with it for a full course of treatment before I try any other pill medications. I will look into Medigold and other antibiotic foods. My one question right now is whether I should add a parasite-killer (malachite green/Maracide or Coppersafe -- I basically only have access to Mardel products for fish medicine). I'm raising the water temp now also.

The Whisper filter does have a spongy filter as well as the fiber-and-carbon bio-bags. I may have removed and squeezed the sponge last week when I changed the water. I noticed today that the filter was overflowing back into the tank, so I changed the bio-bag today. I hope that wasn't a bad idea.

There are only two things that have changed in the tank lately:

1. Here in Madison, WI, we had nearly ten days of humid 90 or near-90 F weather that ended around the time the fish got sick. During this time, the water temp may have crept up to 85F (my apartment is not air-conditioned) and stayed there for a few days at a time.

2. I switched from 1/2 RO and half tap to all tap water for this tank when I discovered the water coming out of my RO filter has a very low pH. I did this maybe 2-3 weeks before the fish got sick. The tap water here has lots of fun things in it from the lakes and agricultural runoff nearby, and without the RO filter it's impossible to grow freshwater aquarium plants in this area. My goldfish tank does have plants in it, so they should be dying right about now now -- should I just pull them all out, even though they seem okay so far in this water?

I do not test all water parameters weekly, but it would probably be a good idea for me to test the nitrItes every 24 hours for a week, b/c...

I am beginning to think the tank is overstocked for the filtration that I have, even with a filter designed for a 30 gallon tank cranked up all the way (and I think you're hinting at this also), and possibly for the volume as well. Consequently, I suspect that the nitrItes rise over the course of the week, then fall Saturday or Sunday (when I do a water change) and then rise again.

Possible long-term solutions:

1. Bubble wall. This would necessitate an airpump (and bubblewall) purchase, yes? How much does a bubble wall cost?

2. Removing one of the fish from the tank. The logical choice would probably be the 2.5" panda telescope. This fish has a congenital swim bladder problem; somehow he remains healthy despite the fact that he sinks like a stone when he moves about and spends most of his time lying still on his right side (I'm amazed he hasn't gotten an infected lesion from the gravel -- he's been like this for about a year). Would parting this guy from his larger friends reduce whatever quality of life he has? Sometimes they "school" together when the other two rest on the bottom. There are 3 fish in the tank total, about 12 inches of deep-bellied goldfish body. The third fish is an oranda about the same size as the one who's sick, and in happier times they laid eggs together (and then ate them together). The two orandas are a very nice pair, and are both about 3 years old.

I'd appreciate any further advice/input. Thanks,

Nathan

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Hi nday and welcome to Koko's.

Sorry to hear of your ill fish, I hope we can help him recover. ;)

Reading through your thread, I'd suspect your change in water supply may be a possible cause. Did the symptoms appear very soon after a water change?

I also note that your tap pH ranges between 7.2 and 7.5, and your tank pH is 8. This is puzzling, and I need some more info to understand a bit better:

You are using liquid tests aren't you? Strip tests can be a bit inaccurate.

Do you add any pH buffer during water changes?

Do you use marine/limestone based gravel?

I would tend to agree with your observation on tank size. How long have you had each fish?

Apologies for so many more questions, but your fish probs are a little puzzling.

Do post back soon.

Slugger :)

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It is actually perfectly fine to use 100% R/O water for your tanks. BUT, you will have to buy a complete water additive that replenishes all the necessary nutrients and the like. There are several products available for precisely your situation.

I do not like the sounds of your municipal water supply. Seems kinda sketchy. I know that you should be given some info as to everything they find in the tapwater. This is available upon request as per law.

It seems as though you might have pH problems and that they too, might be the cause of the sickness in the first place (along with bio-filtration?). For some awesome help with this, start a thread in the water chemistry forum. You are going to need dropper test kits for pH, KH and GH. Might as well pick up the ammonia, nitrIte and nitrAte kits too.

I am not certain whether your filter IS or ISN"T good enough for your tank and stocking density. It pumps at a rate of 210 GPH so that is within the suggested level for a goldfish tank. BUT, that is only if the tank is not overstocked. In a situation such as yours, you might need to get a larger tank and another filter to go with it. You have some time to get that but I think you should be looking for another filter in the meantime. Check BigAlsOnline.com for some sweet deals on penguin bio-wheel filters. Whatever size filter you get, make sure that it will work for the size tank you eventually upgrade to. Rule of thumb is 100gph per ten gallons tankwater, MINIMUM.

I am not completely sure if I am on the right track here but I very much feel that water quality is the source of the problem. In knowing this, the problem must be fixed before any treatment can be considred effective.

As is commonly known, antibiotics can cause blips in the cycle. Bacteria is responsible for cleaning ammonia and nitrItes from the water and when there is a bacteriacidal compound in the water, they stand a chance of suffering as a result. This, I still maintain, could be the possible reason for the nitrItes recently climbing.

All in all, daily testing and waterchanges are going to be needed until you can get the waterquality and treatment finished.

Since you haven't seemed to have seen any improvement from your goldie, I suggest that maracyn 1 be tried concurrently with the maracyn 2. Of course, a quarentine hospital tank is a smart move. But, either 100% waterchanges are to be done daily, or there needs to be a functioning bio-filter. Either way, testing daily is needed.

Good luck and post back soon. :D

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Um, if I do daily 50% water changes won't I need to give double doses of antibiotics to maintain a constant and appropriate concentration in the water?

I will post nitrIte test results for both the tank (48 hrs. after water change) and tap tomorrow morning, along w/ pH of both.

If I move the 2.5" fish to another tank on his own, it should be to a 10 gallon minimum, even if he doesn't move around or eat much, yes? Could he get by in a 5?

The big issue with the tapwater here is not chemicals, it's hardness, which is a result of the lakes nearby; I've been told tropical freshwater plants can't grow in water as hard as we have here -- hence the RO filter. I'm sorry I didn't mention that earlier, but I wasn't remembering the specifics (been taking the fact that I need to run RO water for my tropicals for granted for a long time).

I have been using drip tests for all water data; I do not have limestone-based gravel (not that I'm aware of, anyway -- it doesn't look like limestone).

The tank has been set up for ~5 months; the fish I've had for longer than that -- two 3 year-olds at 4.5", one 2 year-old at 2.5".

Nathan

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Could you also check if your gravel reacts with vinegar? We just need to rule out the possibility of shells or limestone mixed in the gravel.

I am interested to see your latest water parameters. Would it be possible for you to check both tap and tank KH/GH?

With regard to your nitrite levels, I take it they are not normally this high. Were they zero before the fish started to behave odd? If this is the case, I would agree with Toothless on the medication affecting your filter microbes. Otherwise it would be down to insufficient filtration/tank size.

Slugger :)

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Just referring to your question about doubling the dose of medication due to 50% water changes.

If your medication requires daily doses there is no need to double it. Most of the effectiveness wears off during a 24hr period, hence the re-dosing.

If your medication requires alternate day treatment, say, day 1, day 3, etc, then replace the amount removed with each water change. ie. if you change 50% of the water, replace 50% of medication.

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You can test your tanks paramters (for everything) immediatly after performing a waterchange. Amquel plus will not mess with test results. Basically, if you are diluting a concentration of a particular level (nitrItes lessened through water changes) The effect is immediate so the testing can be immmediate.

Fishmerised is spot on with the medication doses according to waterchanges.

Yes, you can get by with treating the sick fish in a 5 gallon tank. Just make sure your calculations for medication dosages are correct. Keep in mind that the water in a 5 gallon tank can go sour twice as fast a ten gallon tank. So, you would do good to test twice a day, once in the morning and once at night.

If your water is very hard, 300ppmish, then you might just have a good KH as well. This translates into a nice stable pH. If you can get the test kits for pH,KH and GH, we will know for sure what to do.

Hope this helps! :)

Paul

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Guest nday

Today's ph in tank: between 7.5 and 8.0

pH from tap: between 7.0 and 7.5

pH from RO filter: between 6.0 and 6.5

(kit color scale deals in increments of .5)

Today's nitrItes in tank (2 days after water change): between .3 and .8 mg/L

nitrItes from tap: under .3 mg/L

nitrItes from RO: under .3 mg/L

Right now the water in the tank is effectively 90+% tap (last 3-4 50% water changes have all been w/ tap water)

Sick fish's appearance: same. Began a new course of minocycline/Maracyn-2 yesterday.

I do not have tests for GH/KH, and have been assured by the owner of the fish store I used that the tap water here is fine, health-for-fish-wise, and that GH and KH are non-issues. The store and owner, incidentally, are both devoted solely to fresh- and salt-water fishkeeping, and have been located in the area for at least 5 years, so I trust he knows what he's talking about.

There is a population of a short-lived snail species that lives in this tank. Right now, there are a few larger adults and a lot of eggs, but no juvenile snails (I'm guessing the salt may have something to do with this, but I also cut down on the amount of food that I give the fish about a month ago). There are quite a few empty shells mixed in with the gravel. Repeat: there are maybe 1/4-1/3 cup of snail shells mixed into the 20 lb. of gravel that is in this tank at this time.

Re. moving one fish out of this tank: I would not be moving the sick fish, but a smaller fish who is healthy but disabled (improperly functioning swimbladder, which I think is genetic in this case), and I'd be relocating him permanently. "Can a 3" goldfish who doesn't move much live okay in a 5 gallon tank with weekly 50% water changes if he's all alone in the tank, and is it a good idea to move him even though he'd be alone?" is the question I was trying to ask.

thanks,

Nathan

PS: So, it sounds like people are thinking either the high nitrItes are a potential cause of the problem, or a side effect of the antibiotic treatment?

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Well, certainly there is someting amiss with your tanks water. I mean, in a normally functioning tank with a normal pH and KH, the pH will drop over time. Not rise over time. This, to me, raises a red flag immediately. Regardless of what your local shop person tells you, you won't know for sure unless you test for yourself.

Points of intrest are:

pH is suppose to drop over time because the nitrificaqtion cycle is an acidic process. So, pH is suppose to drop over time. If pH rises over ti,e. there is something amiss either with your tank and its decorations, or with the water coming from your tap. You can easily test this for yourself by drawing some straight tapwater into a bucket and let it sit out for a day or three. Test every day and record the results. If the pH changes any more than .2, further investigation is required. If the pH changes at about 1 full ppm from the tap to your tank within a day or two, and its rising, this means that you probably have too high a KH to hold your pH steady at the number it comes out of the tap at.

NitrItes being in your tapwater raises yet another red flag. This tells me that there is more to your tapwater than you really know. Since your tapwater DOES contain nitrItes, then you have already found the source of at least some of it that is in your tanks (the rest could be misinterpretation of test results, easily done with dip tests). Steps should be taken to detoxify the nitrItes with prime or amquel plus at each and every waterchange.

With the variables listed above, it should be imperative to you to investigate for yourself as to what your tapware is actually comprised of. I think you'll be surprised at the results.

I think you can tell that I still believe there is something wrong with your tapwater. The nitrItes are a very strong arguement for that. As I said before, if you start a thread in the water chemistry forum, you can get to the bottom of this once and for all. Don't forget to request your own records of your cities water supply.

Water quality seems to be the source of your problems. Fluctuating pH and measureable nitrItes are a lethal combination for fish. Get them fixed soon and you might just have a successful treatment. :unsure:

Good luck!

Paul

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No and no? :huh:

With the snail thing, I was pondering that and I'm not sure that the snail shells are causing the KH to rise and bringing the pH up with it. It is possible but I still have my doubts. Anyway, my reason for doubting that is becasue shells and the like don't break down readily in water that has a pH of 7.3 and above. Anything below that and the shells would start to break down until enough KH were released to make the pH rise. In a sence, the pH shouldn't fall below 7.3 in a tank that is buffered with oyster shells, coral, snail shells, etc. It should rise until the pH gets to a high enough number for the breaking down to stop. In all honesty, this is just an educated guess.......

I propose this theory:

If the pH of your tapwater is coming out in the low 7's and eventually rises to the high 7's (or even higher at times?), then I think that perhaps the nitrItes in the tapwater are making the pH come out of the tap at a low 7. Simply because nitrItes are acids, they should cause pH to drop a bit. After the nitrItes are dealt with by the bio-filter, a high KH of the water would cause the pH to rise. Again, this is an educated guess at best.

The only way to REALLY get to the bottom of the pH, KH, GH thing is to test on your own with different controlled experiments among your tanks and tapwater.

Sorry for seeming to pull you off track here. How is your sick one doing? :huh:

Paul

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Sorry, my attempt at humour. :)

I meant "no and no" in answer to his Question: whether to move his unsick fish, and whether a 5g would be ok.

Didn't mean to confuse the thread.

Slugger :)

(Edited 5g instead of 6g)

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I too am inclined to lay the blame on the water source.

I also have my doubts on the snail shells, they wouldn't dissolve in a high pH environment.

Not sure about the tap nitrites and pH idea either. If the pH moves because of nitrification, surely the bi-carbonates must be used up first. If there is a steady source of replenishing bi-carbonates, I don't think the pH would budge. (Where is dataguru? ;) )

An idea I have that dissolved carbon dioxide in the tap water may be temporarily suppressing pH. After sitting a few days, the CO2 would be released, and the pH rises. You could see if this is a plausible explanation, as Toothless suggests testing a bucket of tap water over a few days.

Sluggish fish could indicate low levels of oxygen, but dissolved CO2 would be easily dispersed by aeration.

I think we really need to know what is in the tap water, because we are just guessing at possibilities.

Slugger :)

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Yeah, I wasn't really fond of that idea either (nitrItes reducing pH temporarily).

Its all grasping at straws until we know the status of the tapwater......... :unsure:

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Okay, so last night I changed out 8 gallons from the 20 gallon tank my goldfish are in, putting in 5 gallons of RO water and 3 gallons of tap water. 24 hrs. later, the nitrites were at ~.2mg/L -- test water tinged slightly darker than the <.3 mg/L tint on the chart that came with my Tetra test kit, but not as dark as the .3 mg/L tint (and there's nothing between the two).

A note on my tapwater: the test kit I have can't discriminate between "<.3 mg/L" and "0 mg/L" because the second indicator fluid is tinted yellow going into the sample, and if there is less than .2 mg/L or so there's no reaction, and the color yellow of the second indicator fluid is the same color as the test chart's lowest readout ("<.3 mg/L"). In other words, with the test I have I can't say for certain that there are nitrItes in my tap water -- the test can't really specify once the concentration is below .3 mg/L. In any case, there was no change of indicator color when I tested the tap water for nitrItes the other day.

Is it possible that the water trouble I've been having (worrisome nitrates, pH above rather than below tap pH) could be caused by an overstocked tank with decaying plant matter in it?

Nathan

PS: decaying plant matter b/c I stopped putting in soft RO water when the pH dropped under 7.0; hopefully with 25% RO water in the tank the pH will come down from 8.0 and the plants will stop dying.

PPS: Should I treat the tank with Amquel? I am going to the store tomorrow for Maracyn 1 to add to the Maracyn 2 treatment, which is still not producing any positive results. Good thing this fish is a trouper (knock on wood).

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Thanks for the detailed info, it may prove useful. I'm also glad to see your fish is still hanging in there. :)

My interpretation would be that there may be a trace of nitrites in your tap water which replenishes the nitrites in the tank with each water change. There is no great increase in nitrite readings, so we may assume that your filter is coping with the current level of waste, decomposition of plants.

I don't think dead plant material or nitrites will lead to an increase in pH over, time, quite the opposite. I'd expect pH to fall due to the acidic processes.

If I were in your shoes, I would forget about using tap water and try to sort out a rock steady tank pH, by using 100% RO water, with mineral supplements as Toothless suggested. After adding a pH buffer that also increases KH, your pH shouldn't budge between or during water changes.

At the same time, you could consider the previous suggestion to add an airstone/air pump. This will definitely improve the well-being of your fish by increasing surface turbulence.

I'm not sure about the meds you are using, but salting will help mild infections.

Do post back, hopefully with good news.

Slugger :)

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Slugger is spot on! :exactly

Yes, ANYTIME you have nitrItes or ammonia readings from your tank, you should immediately utilize amquel plus as per the directions on the bottle. You can do this with meds and almost all other additives without a hitch.

Methinks perhaps that you might need to switch meds soon if you don't get any positive results. I'll do a liitle research and get back to you on exactly what you should try.

Slugger? :huh:

Paul

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yeah, I gotta say, I think salt is the single greatest tool in treating goldfish. Well, that and the advent of prazi. But that is coming from a "parasite freak"..... :rolleyes:

nday,

I went to research a bit and I realized that we do not have a current report on the symptoms you are seeing as of lately. If you could give us a recap of whats goin on as far as symptoms, it might wind up that we need to stop medicating altogether and concentrate on the water quality. But, that rest entirely upon whats going on with your fish.

It has been my experince that pristine water conditions alone can allow goldfish to expell the problem themselves. For instance, I have a black moor that is very close to ten years old and is a full ten inches long. He has never, ever been medicated with anything. Not even salt. He has had MANY, MANY different ailments spring forward through the years too. Including several bouts of finrot, excess slime, fungus, and even a particularly nasty looking tmorous growth at the crux of his upper and lower lobes of his tail (pink, angry, brainy looking growth about the size of the last knuckle on your pinky). Anyway, every one of these subsided with close watch on the params and a healthy diet.

Post back soon. :)

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Hi,

let's see -- last 50% water change was Tuesday, with half of the new water being RO.

Nitrites have held steady under .3 mg/L (again, my test can't read any lower than that) -- scratch that; nitrites were under .3 for two days, now are at .3 (this is day 4 after last water change). pH is currently spot-on 7.5.

Yesterday was the last dose in the course of minocycline, and it still didn't seem to have helped. I switched to Maracyn (gram-positive antibiotic), and treated the tank (20 gal.) with 4 tsp. of Amquel. I stuck in a Whisper E from the tank these fish outgrew to add more filtration, and cleaned out the lift tube in the Whisper 30, and I think it may be helping -- there's a solid current running across the tank. The sick fish's breath doesn't look labored any more, but he's still sitting on the bottom. sometimes his dorsal isn't clamped all the way down, though.

Should I increase the salt concentration in the tank past .3%? Give him salt baths? I will try feeding them some shelled peas tonight (the other big (by my standards) oranda his having flotation problems too -- she's bobbing head down).

So: there is no such thing as a zero rating on my nitrIte kit, so I can't really know with the supplies I have whether there are nitrItes in the tapwater or not. I will do another water change tonight -- 10 gallons out, 5 RO in, 5 tap in, treat with Maracyn for 5 days and continue to monitor the nitrItes and pH daily. Will the added filtration (increased power in the 30, plus the addition of the E filter which has a bio-bag but no sponge) help keep the nitrItes down?

Nathan

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Good to see that you've maintained a steady pH, hopefully your water will stay that way without more tinkering.

I'd say more filtration is always good, regardless of the source of nitrites.

From your descriptions, the meds don't seem to be working, but your fishy seems to be toughing it out. Good on him/her.

I wouldn't recommend increasing concentration/salt baths unless you know what is wrong with your fish because it will be very stressful on already sick fish. Toothless might have some advice here.

Is he/she still eating?

Sorry I haven't got much more to add. I believe your fish may be stressed a lot of the time due to water quality (nitrites) and or fluctuating pH. Couple this with the recent warm weather (increased bacterial activity) and changes to water supply, your fish has probably gotten ill due the cummulation of these factors. By treating with antibiotics now, your are treating the acute symptoms, but I think the chronic cause may still be there.

Keep us posted.

Slugger :)

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