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Pics Of My Friends Saltwater Tank


jsrtist

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My friend Aaron (Wrasseman01) took some pics of his tank to share on here. Its a 26 gallon saltwater tank. Dont know if many of you are into SW or not but thought I'd share them anyway. Enjoy! The first pic is of his vlamingi tang.

post-17-1067049201.jpg

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Guest Sapphyra

Saltwater fan here :hi heheheh

One of my bosses sets up saltwater tanks for companies and such. He brought back some beautiful pictures of the last tank he set up.. a MASSIVE frogspawn that could make anyone drooool LOL

Share more pics :D

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Guest RanchLover2

:hi

You definitely have a salt water fan here. My husband and I are in the process of setting up a 90 gallon reef tank. We have the tank, stand and hood.

We are waiting until after the new year to set it up. :panana WooHoo!.

When its all up and going and looks good, ill post some pics.

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  • Regular Member

Yay, we do have some saltwater fans!! I think I'll lend him the camera again?it was the first time he had used it and was still getting used to it. The first pic is a Vlamingi tang?Im not sure of the scientific name of it. The other fish are his bicolor angel and the male maroon clown. He also has a female maroon but she was shy. :)

Thats awesome that youre setting up a 90 gallon reef! That will look so awesome. Are you planning on putting any fish in it, or is it coral-only? What types of coral are you planning to have?

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Guest watermama

Saltie fan here too!! :hi I've had a salt tank for 3 years now....it's a 55g and I really love it.

Nice pics and all, but, umm..........all's I'm going to say is I wish your friend the very best of luck.

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  • Regular Member

Yay, glad to see so many other salt fans! Do any of you have pics of your tanks? I'd love to see them. Wait, why do you say you wish him luck? Is something wrong? :huh:

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Guest watermama

I truely and sincerely wish your friend luck because unfortunately, he's going to need it.....

I wasn't really going to say anything, mainly because he isn't asking for any help, but then I thought gee...if someone else comes along and thinks this is the right way to do things.....sooo....

First off he has a small tank. 26g's...and with the LR in there, the actual water volumne is closer to 18 to 20g's. And he has 4 fish in there. Vlamingi tangs are well, tangs. They get large and they need swimming room. They are also pooping machines. Maroon clowns are notorious for being the most aggressive of the clowns (the largest too) and he has a pair in there. Dwarf angels are a nice fish but are known to be somewhat delicate and can be ich magnets (meaning they are easily stressed). In that small, small tank with the bioload too high and aggressive tankmates well....only time will tell. Not even going to go into the algae problems he is bound to have.....

Sorry :(

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Guest mikefromwhities

watermama:

wow, those are some pretty bold statements, so allow me to correct you.

Let's start off with the angelfish statement first.

Dwarf angels are a nice fish but are known to be somewhat delicate and can be ich magnets (meaning they are easily stressed). In that small, small tank with the bioload too high and aggressive tankmates well....only time will tell

I don't know if you own or have read "Marine Fishes" by Scott Michael, I doubt you have, but if you did you would know that that angelfish are actually quite hardy and adapt the aquarium pretty easily. Scott Michael uses a ranking system on aquarium suitability and all pygmy angels were given a ranking of 4 with the exception of only 2 which ranked a 3. Let me quote Scott Michael for you

a ranking of 4: These species are generally durable and hardy, with most individuals acclimating to the home aquarium.

How many pygmy angels have you kept? I personally have kept 3 over the last 5 years of reefkeeping, they have all be successful. 2 Flame angels and one Lamarck angel. Never a problem with ich, in fact, angels are quite hardy and usually resist ich even when other fish are showing symptons of ich. Angels also are quite active and have a personality of being somewhat aggressive themselves at times and are RARELY stressed by other fish in the aquarium. Delicate, I think not, maybe for those who are not familiar with keeping reefs, they may have trouble, but anyone with any reasonable knowledge of a saltwater tank should be able to keep a pygmy angel pretty easily.

Now lets talk about algae:

Not even going to go into the algae problems he is bound to have

hmmmmmmmmm....where to start. algae problems are entirely nutrient based, except for coralline algae which is calcium based. to say that he is bound to have nuisance algae problems is a bit bold too. so let me correct you on that while im on a roll here, protein skimming, live rock, deep sand bed, water changes. 4 elements that can easily control nuisance algae. Protein skimmers remove excess nutrients from the water, these nutrients, if ignored, could cause an algae problem, however, the addition of a protein skimmer to a reef or any saltwater tank already decreases the chances of nuisance algae becoming a problem. Live rock serves as bio media in a reef tank, just like you would use bio balls or a bio wheel on a freshwater tank, reef keepers use live rock as the basis for biological filtration. you must know that a healthy system established biologically with live sand and live rock already decreases your chances once again of having nuisance algae? you know that dont you? right? tell me you know that? please....

also, back to nutrients, most excess nutrients come from overfeeding and lack of water changes, even if the bioload is slightly high, this can be compensated for with regular water changes along with fewer feedings and monitored feedings, making sure to not overdo it is most important. Water changes also help, water changes help remove organics in the water as well, and replacing your water with purified water such as RO water with a high quality sea salt also replenishes your essential elements, and clean water also helps keep nuisance algae from becoming a problem.

Vlamingi tangs are well, tangs. They get large and they need swimming room. They are also pooping machines

you are making the assumption that this tang will live in a 26 gallon forever. lets discuss something, if a vlamingi tang was the size of my pinky finger, would it be wrong to keep it in a 26 gallon? NO, if it was full grown and in a 26 gallon, YES. you are correct in saying that tangs need room, i wont argue there, however, tangs will also do fine in small tanks at small sizes, most people make the assumption that a small tang needs just as much room as a large tang which isnt necessarily true, a small tang will adapt and do fine in a smaller tank, however, the tang must also be monitored and as it grows it will be moved into a larger aquarium. assuming that 1) the owner doesnt know what he is doing and 2) assuming the tang will live there forever, are two points that lead to information being spread that isnt necessarily true, what you should have done was questioned future arrangements for the tang before assuming that the 26 gallon would be its final tank.

Maroon clowns are notorious for being the most aggressive of the clowns (the largest too) and he has a pair in there

not necessarily true, most clowns with the exception of perculas/ocellaris will only shows signs of aggression to others of their kind unless it is a male female combination. two males will most definitely show aggression. however, i keep clowns in all of my tanks, and they arent the slightest bit aggressive, i have a 1 inch pseudochromis that is more aggressive than my 4 inch male maroon clown. clowns will only become somewhat bothered when other fish approach their territory. for example, my maroon clown decided my tridacna gigas was its host, so when ever it is around the gigas and other fish swim by, he gives them a quick chase and its over, no harm done, ever. definitely not the largest either, females do get pretty big, full grown clarks will easily outgrow maroon clowns, they get extremely large. even saddlebacks and skunks will approach 6 inches when full grown.

In that small, small tank with the bioload too high and aggressive tankmates well....only time will tell

ever heard of nano tanks? 1 gallon, 2 gallon, 1/2 gallon, etc. extremely small reef ecosystems kept in a "small tank" with a bioload that easily is too large for it, but they still thrive and are maintained healthy by attention to detail, water changes, not overfeeding, etc. never say a tank is too small, there is no such thing as a tank being too small, anything is possible if the person responsible for the tank knows what he/she is doing. Also, like i mentioned a bit earlier in my novel, a heavy bioload can easily be taken care of, with little if any ill effects on the overall health of the tank.

well i think i pretty much hit all of your topics, i am not here to cause any problems i am just hear to inform you that none of your statements really had a solid foundation, and i wanted to help correct them so that the proper explanations and information are provided. im not looking to keep this going either, my friends told me about this at work, i work with wrasseman01 and was told about this post so i decided to come on here and correct some stuff. no harm intended. just be careful about assumptions and spreading information that isnt necessarily true because that leads to even more problems. i have been in this hobby a long time and i have been working in the retail aspect of it for almost 4 years now. wrasseman isnt a marine biologist, but he knows what he is doing and so do i. i am not sure a goldfish forum is the best place to obtain information about reefs.

try out www.reefcentral.com

great site with a lot of information.

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Guest watermama

I will still stand by my statement that "if someone else comes along and thinks this is the right way to do things"......I am merely trying to impress on others that shoving 4 fish (some large, some aggressive) into a 26g isn't really the best way to start out.

I have no way of knowing whether the owner of these fish understands their adult size, if the owner has any future plans on upgrading the tank, or even replacing the fish when they begin to grow....I sincerely hope that he will.

I will argue with you that keeping these fish in such a small tank is going to cause problems down the road....it's good to know that he is up to the task of dealing with these problems.....but OTHER'S WHO READ THIS MAY NOT BE!!! and it is true whether you want to believe this or not, that this small tank has a very high bioload and he will be having problems sooner or later.

Oh yeah, I've read Scott Michaels book thank you.....but you see, when they write these books, they don't mean for the fish to be kept in substandard conditions......overcrowded fish get stressed....

I've also hung out at reefcentral....it IS very informative....perhaps you and your friend should actually READ some of the posts.....

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Guest mikefromwhities

i have been into this hobby much longer than you, i can guarantee that. i can also guarantee i am more experienced then you. and by the way, i do read the posts. i have over 3000, im a sponsor of reef central, and soon to be a member of Team RC, quite an accomplishment for someone who doesnt "read the posts" don't you think? nice try on the insult....

also, you didnt help anyone with your post because you just ASSUMED that you were correct in thinking that the owner knew nothing, that is basically an insult to the owner. I think if anyone new to the hobby they would obtain more knowledge from my post then they would from yours, i can guarantee that.

and also, when could anyone look at a thumbnail and know the exact size of the fish, i know i cant, maybe you have super-human capabilities.

i was mature about this situation and corrected you on everything that you messed up, however, you're first response was to come on here and bash my experience level, which doesn't say a lot about you as a person, and it also shows that you don't have much experience, since an experienced hobbyist would have known a better way to handle this situation and certainly would have responded with a more intelligent argument.

wanna talk about sources? about experience?

here is my experience

-first fish tank when i was 6 years old, i am going to be 20 next month, i have not gone a single day, week, month or year without some type of setup running since that day.

-almost 6 years in saltwater reef keeping including an SPS dominated reef tank.

-4 years working for a retail story in the fish department.

-what books have you read? here is a list of books i have read, and i didnt just look at the pretty pictures, these books have been read cover to cover.

Reef Invertebrates (calfo/fenner)

The Book of Coral Propagation (calfo)

Marine Fishes (Scott Michael)

Live Sand Secrets (goemans)

Protein Skimming and Activated Carbon Secrets (goemans)

Host Anemone Secrets (dr. ron shimek)

Marine reef aquarium handbook (goldstein)

The tropical marine fish survival manual (kay)

Natural Aquarium World 1-3 (amano)

The biotope aquarium (stawikowski)

Natural reef aquariums (tullock)

The reef aquarium vol 1 & 2 (sprung & delbeek)

The Practical Guide to Corals for the Reef Aquarium

The New Marine Aquarium

also many books about the care and breeding of discus, and many other books on freshwater planted tanks, i didnt think listing them here would be any good since we are discussing saltwater.

not to mention the years of subscriptions to Aquarium Fish magazine, I also pick up tropical fish hobbyist monthly at work, and i pick up the monthly issue of practical fishkeeping which is imported from the UK, i also read SeaScope which is a free publication that most pet stores receive, and I just filled out my subscription form to CORAL which is a new reef magazine due out in march, and of course my online involvement with sites such as reefcentral has helped me out along the way as well.

im leaving for vegas now, i will be back wednesday to see your response and i guess if necessary we can continue then.

if you are trying to insult someone on experience level, you most certainly picked the wrong person, and i have several people that can vouch for that if you want me to bring in more sources. do not come on here and insult my intelligence or my experience level because you are embarassed that i basically insulted yours, you are of no help to anyone new to this hobby when you posts things like that. that is why i came on here to help. i even said i wasn't looking to cause problems, but then you had to go and say something about me when i was trying to be mature about it.

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listen guys no one is trying to insult anyone, if ya are gunna get a little off the lines of friendly please do so in pm, its not a polite thing for others to be reading......

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Guest watermama

The only thing I said that was even slightly insulting was that you and your friend should read some of the posts at RC (where oh where did I even remark about your experience level??).....I think it was you that started with the insults dearie......

Listing all the books I've read and the magazines I suscribe to would take up way too much time and seems rather immature....

The last comment I have to say about this whole mess is that my original post was meant for those who may be interested in starting up a new saltwater tank.....as I've pointed out several times. To a newbie to the salt side of the hobby, this is not the way to start out.

Nuff said.

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Sorry I didnt mean for this to get out of hand. Watermama I realize and understand what you mean about someone coming along, thinking this is the right way to do something, and I should have specified a few things. He is an experienced hobbyist, this tank has been running successfully for 2 years, and he is planning on setting up both a 60 and a 100 gallon tank. Didnt really go into that, just wanted to post some pictures! :)

Anyone who is interested in getting into saltwater (myself included), I really recommend picking up some good books (like those Mike mentioned) and doing a lot of research online. The books even though pretty recent, can even still be outdated which is why researching online is so important. I myself am wanting to go with some very hard to keep fish (seahorses and madarin dragonets) which are not recommended for beginners. Rather than start out not really knowing what Im doing, Im starting my research now for a tank I hope to have up sometime next year. Anyway research is always the key to being successful, I think. I just see way too many people who come into our store and their solution is, if it dies I'll just buy a new one.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest wrasseman01

I am glad so many people have an interest in saltwater, thank you for your nice comments and Mike is a good friend of mine, and he was just trying to defend me.

I set up my first saltwater tank in 1985 (what a failure), and several since then, but I have not only done salt I have been doing fresh for 20+ years, including every aspect of it community, goldfish, and cichlids both African and Central & South American. I hope that if anything I can help as many people stay in this great hobby as I can, and with concerned people like Mike, Jenny, and a newbie our friend Josh, we can do this.

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