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Fry


Roano

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In general, how many fry are produced in spawning? I have heard goldfish lay about 300 eggs, and heard that usually 100 fry survive. I was thinking about breeding in the future, but was put off by the amount of fry produced; I don't have enough room, and don't like the idea of culling. I've been reading through some posts in this section though and it seems people end up with only a few fry on their first try. Can anyone who has had experiance with breeding tell me about the result of their first spawn and the amount of surviving fry?

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First pond spawn - almost none survived as the fish in the pond ate them. In the first case where I saved eggs from the pond by removing plants with eggs on them, again almost none survived; probably a dozen or so. There are now 5 adults in the pond two years later from that effort. Lots of eggs hatched, probably over 100 but most of them were lost when fungus moved in. I don't think you'll have to worry about having too many fish with the first spawn. I've found there is a lot to learn. Now, if you want them then I'd make an effort by using methylene blue with the eggs and an air stone for water movement. I'd feed freshly hatched brine shrimp, change most of the water daily, once they are a little larger and free swimming, use a daily fungus treatment. Right now I have what appears to be hundreds of fry from one spawning on Easter Sunday. Taking care of them is wearing me out and I'm going to dump them all in to one big plastic swimming pool as soon as I can get it set up. Good luck!

Milo

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As few as 20-30 per spawn at one year old, 100-200 at two years old, 300 or more at three years old. The numbers start to fall off again after they reach 4-5 year old.

If you don't want to cull, then don't bother raising the fry. If you let natural selection keep the number of fish at a reasonable level, the worst fish will survive and the best will be the first to perish.

An alternative may be to put a kiddie pool outside. Select the best fish and give them your best care. Throw the rest in the kiddie pool and let them fend for themselves. If you're lucky, a heron will find them take care of the situation for you.

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If you don't want to cull, then don't bother raising the fry.  If you let natural selection keep the number of fish at a reasonable level, the worst fish will survive and the best will be the first to perish.

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I completely agree. Culling is completely nessesary. If you are raising goldies you only want the best and also goldfish take up alot(late me rephrase that-!!!ALOT!!!) of room. And its unlikely that youll be able to sell all of them. The best way I have found to cull (ive never bred but from what ive heard) is to put the culled ones in with the adults and walk away. Your adults get a good meal and you dont have to do anything. Its for the best. Good luck.

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Thanks for all the advice; I still plan to wait awhile befor breeding, but just wanted to know some of the results of it.

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You can cull for tail orientation when they are about 3/8 inch. The adults will probably eat these. However, the serious culling cannot start until they demelanize. That's at about 5/8 inch for orandas, but much later for some other varieties. You will not be able to get the adults to eat too many of these big boys. If you're not ruthless, then don't breed goldfish.

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Guest yabbie

Figures of first attempt at raising fry:

Rescued 300 eggs from african cabbage in mouth of playful dog (off to a bad start)

90 something hatched

After 6 weeks of trial and error - 35

After 11 weeks - 20 healthy fry remain (plus two deformed and one midget)

(Mine were on a fairly low care regime since I had to go away twice during this time and had to pay a kid to pop in on her way home from school once a day and feed them - but I'm pleased with the results. They are good-looking fish in terms of shape and fin shapes - waiting for them to colour up now)

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I would really like to breed some of my fish, but need to think about it a bit more because, honestly, I'm not sure whether I could cull the babies. I've sort of decided maybe breeding isn't for me right now; maybe in the I will in the future. Sounds like a wonderful experiance!

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