Jump to content

Goldfish Diseases


Guest lenny165

Recommended Posts

Guest lenny165

With all the goldfish diseases out there is there anything you can add to your tank to keep it free from these diseases and parasites. Also do the strip methods of checking your levels in the water ok. And if your levels are off what is the best stuff to use. New and willing to learn. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

There isn't anything I know of to keep a tank completely disease and parasite free. I'm unsure what your asking in the second question; the water test strips are used for checking the params of your tank. If your levels are off there are certain things you can do to get them down to normal, though this varies depending on what your trying to fix. Is there any one of your levels that your specificly worrying about, or are you just curious? If you are having trouble with your tank's params, you can post questions about it in the Goldfish Tanks section, under the subforum Water Chemistry.

Hope this helps!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Lenny, there are no "wonder things" things that you can put in the tank and instantly keep out any parasites or harmful bacteria. If there were such a thing, believe me, we all would make a run for it! :lol:

There are however things that you can do to minimize the risks as much as possible. The foremost prevention is prestine water - 90% of all illnesses are caused by stress resulting from unhealthy water conditions. That means no ammonia or nitrites at all times (except while cycling of course :rolleyes: ) and nitrates preferably under 40. Some fish are even sensitive to that and need to be in lower nitrate water.

Stable temperature and pH are also very important. Goldfish can live in almost any pH above 7.0, as long as its stable and not rocking back and forth.

Then there is the quantity of fish that are in the water. The more crowded a fish tank is, the more stress you are putting on the fish, which will result in a higher risk of illness. Some parasites are constantly in our tanks, but because the fish's immune system is up and running, they will not get out of control. An unhealthy water, and this can change pretty fast.

At least 10 gl per fish, for commons and shubunkins at least 20 gl, is a good guideline to discourage overcrowding. Although most of my fish get more gallon/fish, and my comets/shubunkins have 50 gl each.

Weekly water changes to keep the nitrates under control and replenish the fish with fresh water is also a must. Changes from 20-50% are fine for that, depending here again on the stocking of your tank and the amount of food you give them.

The oxygen level in the tank can't be too low. Almost everything in the tank needs oxygen to thrive - the fish as well as the beneficial bacteria. Too little of it, and both will suffer. So pop in that airstone!.... :)

And last but not least - nutritious food. Some feeds have more fillers and have a higher waste ratio than others. These filler foods cause more waste because the fish can't digest all the "ingredients". A good source for high quality food is Goldfishconnection.com. And of course NO overfeeding.

Hope I didn't forget anything....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest lenny165
There isn't anything I know of to keep a tank completely disease and parasite free. I'm unsure what your asking in the second question; the water test strips are used for checking the params of your tank. If your levels are off there are certain things you can do to get them down to normal, though this varies depending on what your trying to fix. Is there any one of your levels that your specificly worrying about, or are you just curious? If you are having trouble with your tank's params, you can post questions about it in the Goldfish Tanks section, under the subforum Water Chemistry.

Hope this helps!

323388[/snapback]

Thanks the second question is about the test water strips i've been using them to check the levels and all seems ok. But others use kits that check each individual livel which is best. Just curious and trying to learn.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest lenny165
Lenny, there are no "wonder things" things that you can put in the tank and instantly keep out any parasites or harmful bacteria. If there were such a thing, believe me, we all would make a run for it! :lol:

There are however things that you can do to minimize the risks as much as possible. The foremost prevention is prestine water - 90% of all illnesses are caused by stress resulting from unhealthy water conditions. That means no ammonia or nitrites at all times (except while cycling of course :rolleyes: ) and nitrates preferably under 40. Some fish are even sensitive to that and need to be in lower nitrate water.

Stable temperature and pH are also very important. Goldfish can live in almost any pH above 7.0, as long as its stable and not rocking back and forth.

Then there is the quantity of fish that are in the water. The more crowded a fish tank is, the more stress you are putting on the fish, which will result in a higher risk of illness. Some parasites are constantly in our tanks, but because the fish's immune system is up and running, they will not get out of control. An unhealthy water, and this can change pretty fast.

At least 10 gl per fish, for commons and shubunkins at least 20 gl, is a good guideline to discourage overcrowding. Although most of my fish get more gallon/fish, and my comets/shubunkins have 50 gl each.

Weekly water changes to keep the nitrates under control and replenish the fish with fresh water is also a must. Changes from 20-50% are fine for that, depending here again on the stocking of your tank and the amount of food you give them.

The oxygen level in the tank can't be too low. Almost everything in the tank needs oxygen to thrive - the fish as well as the beneficial bacteria. Too little of it, and both will suffer. So pop in that airstone!.... :)

And last but not least - nutritious food. Some feeds have more fillers and have a higher waste ratio than others. These filler foods cause more waste because the fish can't digest all the "ingredients". A good source for high quality food is Goldfishconnection.com. And of course NO overfeeding.

Hope I didn't forget anything....

323417[/snapback]

Thank you so much you were very imformative I'm going to print your reply and keep it handy. But I was wondering if the test strips are as good as the test kits that check each level individually. :crp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Lenny - I am a newbie but here is what I have found in my minimal experience. I was using the strips and got frustrated because some of the levels were so close in color but it was a huge difference say between .25 ppm and 1 ppm ammonia. I gave up on strips for that reason. But if you feel like you can get accurate readings with a strip go for it. I also like the drop kits because you get a heckuva lot more tests from them. When I was cycling my tank I was testing twice a day. It was a larger investment at the outset but made sense financially in the long run. It really is whatever you prefer, in my opinion. Of course I have only been doing this since march. ;) I feel like I have a ton of experience with testing my levels since I have done it so much since I started.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

word of advice, many water changes and less chemical. i also think that aquarium salt is beneficial at times but do NOT over use it. GF will live happy with a good filter and foods. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member
many water changes and less chemical

Raith is right. :) Good-sized regular water changes - 40-50% weekly - will do much more to ensure you have contented, healthy, growing fish than any amount of chemicals, treatments or anything else you can add to the tank.

The test strips are quick but they tend not to be very accurate. They give you an idea of the levels, rather than exact results, which is why I do not personally use them. The most accurate test kits available to the hobbyist are the liquid reagents (except for salinity and pH, in which case electronic meters are by far the best option, though very expensive). Aquarium Pharmaceuticals does a good range of liquid kits. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest lenny165
many water changes and less chemical

Raith is right. :) Good-sized regular water changes - 40-50% weekly - will do much more to ensure you have contented, healthy, growing fish than any amount of chemicals, treatments or anything else you can add to the tank.

The test strips are quick but they tend not to be very accurate. They give you an idea of the levels, rather than exact results, which is why I do not personally use them. The most accurate test kits available to the hobbyist are the liquid reagents (except for salinity and pH, in which case electronic meters are by far the best option, though very expensive). Aquarium Pharmaceuticals does a good range of liquid kits. :)

323737[/snapback]

Haven't tried salt yet going out today will pick up some and try. Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest lenny165
many water changes and less chemical

Raith is right. :) Good-sized regular water changes - 40-50% weekly - will do much more to ensure you have contented, healthy, growing fish than any amount of chemicals, treatments or anything else you can add to the tank.

The test strips are quick but they tend not to be very accurate. They give you an idea of the levels, rather than exact results, which is why I do not personally use them. The most accurate test kits available to the hobbyist are the liquid reagents (except for salinity and pH, in which case electronic meters are by far the best option, though very expensive). Aquarium Pharmaceuticals does a good range of liquid kits. :)

323737[/snapback]

Haven't tried salt yet going out today will pick up some and try. Thanks

324176[/snapback]

Will get a kit too this little hobby is getting expensive but oh well there worth it. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Yes, this hobby can get pretty expensive; once I spent $70 in one month on my fish!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...