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Pond Goldfish Sick


Guest cjzak

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Guest cjzak

Hi,

New here. I do not have all the answers to the above requirements. I would like to ask anyway to maybe get some idea of what I am dealing with and if I have any hope of saving this fish. My fish lives outdoors in a small 24"deep pond all year long. there are 2 other fish with him, a small koi(3yrs old) and a shubunkin (4 yrs.). He is 10 years old and has been very healthy but just a few weeks ago, I thought I noticed he was a little slow swimming. We are just getting over winter and so he has not been fed since last fall. the water is still very cold. (We have a heater to keep the pond above 35 in the winter). About 4 days ago I found him lying on his right side, kind of bent over and not moving. I thought he had died and removed him and noticed he was still moving. I took him out of the pond and placed him in an indoor tank with a pump running to aerate. I went to a local fish store and they told me to try some meds called Furan-2 and to salt the water with pond or sea salt which I did. 1tsp. salt per gallon. He is still breathing but just lies on his side at the bottom. He moves around the bottom a little and seems to like being by the pump. Has not been fed nor seems interested in food. the water is warmer than in the pond and I did this gradually. I have seen little improvement after 4 days, but he is still alive. Should I just give up? what might the problem be? Any other suggestions for treatment?

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Laying Over- Layover or Sleeping Sickness is usually a bacterial infection caused by parasites chewing on the gills or skin. In other instances, it is only a result of severe stress, such as a bitter cold or exposure to chlorine. The most common found parasites are Costia, Trichodina, and Chilodinella.

You will have to evaluate for all sources of stress and get them corrected. It is recommended to salt at 0.3% and then in at all possible, inject the fish to offset any infection that may be in the fish's system. Several medications are available.

found that but its only a guess im afraid.

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Guest cjzak

Thanks sandy,

Question--how the heck do you inject a fish? Also should I keep adding salt everyday and changing the water up? Thanks!

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Guest cjzak

Also, I don't think cold water is the problem as this guy lives outside all winter. We did though have a couple warm days 2 weeks ago and then it got really cold again. He's been really resistant and healthy. Did notice when I removed him from pond that he had some slimy deposits at the end of his tail fins.

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Hi there and :welcome

Generally, goldies and koi overwinter in ponds well. But, from time to time, they can fall prey to several different ailments because of the major decrease in immune system function and lack of nutrients. I know its recommended to not feed pondfish in the winter but, no food and low temps equals low immunity, period.

These slimy deposits you spoke of, are they waxy and kind of whitish/yellowish blobs along the edges? If so, this is carp pox (lays dormant til winter) and can easily be controlled with heat (78-82) and possibly some salt. Ich can sometimes take on a similar appearance in cold water too. Ich is easily eradicated with a 0.3% salt solution for 2-4 weeks. Remember to make heat changes spread out over the course of a full day or two. Salt even a bit longer (3 days). If none of these two sound like what your seeing, could you describe them in detail or post a pic?

You need test kits. Without them, you have no possible idea if your fish's water is good or not. In the pond or in the temp tank. You'll need ammonia, nitrIte, nitrAte, pH and KH. Ammonia should always be kept at 0ppm. Same for nitrItes. Nitrates in the pond should be 40ppmish or less. pH should remain stable as well as the temp and salinity.

Can you have a look into the fish's gills? Just lift the gill flap (while underwater) and peer in with a penlight. Healthy gills look red and meaty. If you see any discoloration, slimy spots or dead tissue, I'll bet you that this fish has a bacterial gill infection. While the furan meds are very good meds, they obviously aren't working as of yet so, either salt alone with heat or another med altogether might need to be considered. Salt, as I mentioned earlier, might help clear out some excess slime from the gills and allow for better respiration to the parts of the gills that arent damaged. There is a very good medication (rather cheap to) for bacterial gill infetion called chloramines T. You can get it at pondrx.com for less than 20 bucks and even have it emergency shipped. Another good med to look for is benzokalium chloride. Either of these meds will kill any and all bacteria in the gills whie helping to strip away dead and rotting tissue. Sloughing off of dead tissue will immediately help new growth to start regenerating. The healing of gill tissue is a rapid process.

So, basically, we need more info before we can be sure of what this is. I'll be home from work at 5 (est) tomorrow and will check in.

Good luck and post back soon. :)

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