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Dorsal Fin


coyote ugly

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For a couple of days now,I've seen my ryukin Shio Chan vibrating his dorsal fin.He does this a couple of times a day.I was wondering if this is normal and if anyone has any similar experience :unsure: The vibration is only on his dorsal fin and not his body.I sure hope he's not sick or something.Thank you in advance for any input :)

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Hmmm interesting question.......... I have seen my fish do this on occasion, and usually they are playing or startled by something. I have never worried about it if they are acting fine otherwise.

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Hiya :D

If you see him doing this at any time, it means there is something agitating his fin. Parasites are the first thing to suspect when you see this more then once in a great while. If you are seeing this several times a day, I can pretty much garauntee you that he has a parasite bothering him. Wich one will be solved through either through deduction or microscopic exam. I sugest the micro exam so that you are 100% sure what you are seeing. That way, your treatment can be centered around that specific parasite.

So, do you think you might be able to aquire or borrow/use a microscope for an exam? It really only needs to top out at 400X magnification. It can also be a beginners scope as most parasites are very easily recognised under nothing more than a 20 dollar scope. Kids stores, discovery shops, some hobbyshops and such are good places to locate a good cheapo. Once a microscope has been aquired, you will be very happy to know that there are numerous online sources for short clips of parasites in motion. Not to mention, fully explained techniques for sedation, slime scrapes and lighting tricks.

Anyway, I'm pretty sure that you have one (or more) of these in your tank: costia, chilodonella or flukes. Other not so common parasites would be trichodina, velvet or ergasilus. But these are more they type you would see in a pond with build-up of mulm (poo) in the corners and bottom. Flukes are best treated with praziquantel (droncit). Most strains of costia are eliminated with salt. Chilodonella is also cleared (very easily) with salt. All three are VERY succeptable to salt dips of 3% or higher (is with 90% of parasites). 3% dips are a soooper good addition to almost any parasitic treatment and I highly suggest them to anyone battling any parasite.

So, whats the scoop, fruit loop? Is a cheapo scope a reality for you? To tell you the truth, I have been using the same cheap, plastic, kiddie scope for almost a year now and it has served me well. I just recently bought some proffesional slides and coverslips and was very pleasantly surpised at how much clearer everything looks!

If you aren't able to locate a scope for a positive ID of the bugs. The best you can do is dose the entire tank with salt at a 0.3% salt solution for 2-4 weeks (no less) and see if that clears it up. If it does COMPLETELY stop his fin flicking, you have successfully beaten whatever it was (chilo? costia? velvet?). However, this might only prove to be temporary. Some bugs live through the salting. Namely flukes (or salt resistant strain of costia). They both, very often, live through low salt %'s like 0.3% for loooong periods of time. So, at that point, if no scope ir positive ID was performed, all you can do is assume that it is flukes and/or costia and treat the entire tank with prazi and another chem that costia is succeptable to. Maybe acriflavin. There are others but we wwill cross that bridge when we come to it.

All in all, you need to make a descision on wether you want a definitive diagnosis with a scope or not. Since he doesn't seem to be doing bad at all, you have some time. Otherwise, if you were to go ahead with the salt treatment, you stand the chance of wiping out enough of them so that once you got a scope, detection becomes very hard. In that scenario, a successful treatment could take 2-3 times longer than if a scope was used in the first place. Just a tip...........

I hope you can get this cured before it becomes detrimental. I'm sure you will............

Poat back soon. :)

PAul

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Thanks for the fast reply :)

Well,I've been meaning to get a microscope and the cheapest I've seen so far is about 50 US dollars.I'll go out and try to find one much cheaper later today.

So if I do get a microscope,how exactly do I do a scrape?What to use?If you could kindly give me a link would be great help :)

Thanks so much!

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Oh, Timmys fish Buse does that sometimes, not often. He is a shy fish. Timmy has a microscope, it is 100X, 200X and 300X.

I really don't think he has parasites...

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Hey Cathy - you know where I got my scope from? Ebay :D

It's a 10 year old tasco metal one and has great clarity etc. I paid (and wait for it) $7.50 :o

I priced them in the shops - something similar at about $150

food for thought? :)

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99% of the time, if this is seen in with any sort of regularity, you can bet that a parasite is indeed involved. Goldfish will flick their fins in response to an agitant. There is no other reason for them to do this. Agitants can include parasites, small air bubbles trapped on their slime and toxins in the water like ammonia.

There is another possibility, air bubbles trapped on their slime can feel like a little tickle to them. But, your description of the frequency sounds much more like a parasite to me.

Even if you do not find a single living organism on any of your fish, this does not mean that they are not there. It probably just means that you have not successfully transferred any of them to the slide for examination. Especially if the fish seems otherwise healthy.

Here is a few links to help identify parasites: pondoc parasite videos

pondoc "flashdance" A closer look at parasites

koivet videos

nishigikoi video of costia

And here is a very good page describing th techniques used in skin and gill scrapes: skin and gill scrapes

Hopefully these links will help you. If you are left with any unanswerd questions, don't hesitate to ask......... ;)

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