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PaNdeM0niuM

Overtime The Water Becomes More Acidic..

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i was wondering...overtime (becuz of waste buildup) the water in the aquarium becomes more acidic (lower pH)

does this change in pH affect the fish?????

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Yes, it does, especially if the pH drops below 6.8. Acidic water can "burn" the fish's skin. Thats why a lot of fish develop a whitish slimey film over their skin, trying to protect themselves from it.

The filter can be affected as well, as some of the beneficial bacteria dies off when the pH is too low, and that will do harm to the cycle.

Are you sure the pH dropping is from waste in the water? What exactly is in your tank? Any strange rocks, driftwood?

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Are you sure the pH dropping is from waste in the water? What exactly is in your tank? Any strange rocks, driftwood?

combination of both (i think)

i have driftwood - but i've soaked it for like a month and i think all the tannins have been leached.

in regards to the the waste...i haven't cleaned the sponge in the filter for like 2 weeks??

when should i clean it????? i don't want to remove to much bacteria.

can i clean on the same day as a water change????

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I would wash the filter media with the water taken out of the tank during your water change.

If you are haveing low ph problems - you could always buffer the water. Thats what i do, I get a stable 7.4 everytime. :blink:

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help me out...

BUFFER THE WATER......

what does that mean???

does this mean ADD pH-UP ????

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AAAAHHHHHHH

my fish are shedding their skin !!

their skin is peeling........

i checked the pH....its LESS than 6.0 .....<6.0ppm

oh dear........

what's buffering the water???

what do i have to buy???

will adding pH-UP solve the problem?????

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ok...

i've done a quick water change...

pH back up to 7.6

oh dear...

now...how do i prevent the pH from falling ever again??

what's buffering..is that adding pH-UP????

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first. take the driftwood out for a spell. driftwood tends to soften the water and lower the pH. secondly. run down to your LFS and buy

http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod...1&N=2004+112989

add it to the water as directed. wait a few hours and test the pH again.

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Guest ed586

Pandemonium, the driftwood may be doing it. Check the water hardness. That's how you can tell your water is buffered enough or not. There is a test for that, or ask for the actual numbers from a nearby LFS. They can also tell you if the water tends to be soft or hard in your area and maybe if you need to buffer.

Hope that helps for now.

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Also test your water. We have well water and the Ph is 6.0! I use Buff It Up from the www.goldfishconnection.com. It seems to be working and I add it when I do a water change, just like adding the water conditioner.

Good luck! :heart

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For my buffering I use a media bag, and pour in sand (it was made for Cichlids - I get a perfect 7.4 everytime) Never have to use and conditioner or anything else for that matter. Then I put the media bag in my aquarclear filter.

Alot easier to maintain and I never have to buy any ph conditioner liquid or powder. (More natural in my opinion) :exactly

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quick question:

if i just add the pH-UP....will that solve the problem??????

and stabilise my pH

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hey i just found a product

PROPER pH - aquarium pharmaceuticals

you just choose the pH level for your aquarium

it comes in PROPER pH 6.5, PROPER pH 7.0, PROPER pH 7.5, and PROPER pH 8.2

i think 7.0 will be best for goldfish

PROPER pH automatically adjusts and holds the pH level

The PROPER pH formulas are more than pH adjusters; they are pH buffers. pH buffers are formulated to "lock in" the pH at a predetermined pH level and hold it there for several weeks.

should i get this.....that way i can still keep the driftwood???

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Guest ed586

Ph-Up is not a good option since without the proper buffering in your water, it will not stay up. The PH-UP will make it worse for the fish since the instability is what is more harmful to the goldfish then the actually levels that people normally experience.

You may be able to keep the driftwood if the buffering is the issue. Get a General Harness test and see if you are at normal levels. If you don't have a high enough GH, then the buffering agent's from goldfishconnection.com would work great. If the GH is fine, I would try removing you driftwood.

:goodluck

Edited by ed586

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Get a General Harness test and see if you are at normal levels.

don't you mean Carbonate Hardness???? (KH)

isn't that the one that is associated with pH stability ?

i think General Hardness has to do with dissolved minerals or something.....

??????

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The filter can be affected as well, as some of the beneficial bacteria dies off when the pH is too low, and that will do harm to the cycle.

what about fish that live in acidic waters e.g. ciclids....how are those tanks cycled??

if some good bacteria keep dying in acidic waters...then how can the tank be cycled??

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Okay...I can't answer a lot of the questions that you have but there are a few general things that might help you with your pH situation.

What is the pH from your tap water? If it is around the area you want your pH in your tank to be (7.0-7.6) then do more water frequent water changes.

How often do you clean/gravel vacuum your tank? If your pH is more acidic it could be from the build up of anaerobic bacteria that grows in your gravel over time. (from what I have read anaerobic bacteria also increases the ammonia in the tank ???) If it is from this, clean your tank more often. This also includes cleaning your filter. Even if you just wipe it off in dirty water once or twice a week that's a lot better than leaving it to sit with high ammonia levels in it.

Are you overstocked? More fish mean more ammonia which means it's harder to get good living conditions for your fish. This might take some time but if you are overstocked you can start thinking about how you might be able to get out of it.

As for your question about chiclids I found this tank maintenance page specifically on chiclids if your interested. (click here)

I really hope this helps if not, maybe someone else can help you. :goodluck

Robyn

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Guest Buffalohead

G'day PaNdeM0niuM, I hope this article may bring more light to your PH problem.

pH of water is the measure of the degree of acidity in water. In most aquariums the pH starts out alkaline and normally over time, drops down to acidic levels. These acidic levels are usually caused by waste products produced by fish in the aquarium such as Nitrates. Plants and algae absorb nitrates in the wild, but in the aquarium they accumulate and start converting into Nitric Acid. Sufficient and regular water changes can dilute the Nitrate in the aquarium and therefore keep the pH from diving too low. Adding "pH Up" powder (sodium bicarbonate) to the aquarium can help to maintain a higher pH in between water changes.In situations where the pH is constantly dropping to acidic levels, it may be necessary to 'buffer' the water with other stronger compounds. Buffering is done by what is called 'Hardening' the water. 'Hard' water contains Carbonate and Sulphate Salts. Many people call this 'Hardness', 'Carbonate Hardness' or just 'KH'. These compounds help pH by slowing down the acid drift and helping to maintain a more alkaline pH. Shells and limestone contain Calcium Carbonate, which slowly dissolves into the water and causes it to become hard and alkaline. Only a few varieties of fish are happy to live in very hard, alkaline environments. Hence for this reason it is not recommended, for normal community aquariums, to introduce large quantities of shells or limestone.

There is more to test in your aquarium than just pH. In order to get a full picture of what is happening in your fish tank, tests such as Ammonia, Nitrite, Nitrate, Hardness, Iron, Phosphate etc. should be carried out if you have any problems with your fish or plants. If any particular tests show up any water quality problems, a 'solution' should not be sought before the 'cause' of the problem in established. All too often products such as KH buffers are sold to people with low pH problems, before a Nitrate test is done. If the Nitrates are high, as mentioned above, then this is the cause of the low pH. First a substantial amount of water should be changed before any more chemicals are administered. KH buffers should be used where pH drift occurs regularly between water changes due to a heavily stocked aquarium, or in cases where Carbon Dioxide is injected into the aquarium for extra plant growth.

The most important water quality to consider is where we get most of our water from, tap water. Seasonal variations occur with our water quality and source, so the amounts of various chemicals added to our tapwater are varied to compensate with the seasons. Some species of fish are highly resilient to small levels of chemicals in our tap water, other fish however are not forgiving at all. It cannot be stressed enough that a high quality 'water conditioner' or 'water purifier' is a must when dealing with most fish. When many people say their fish look sick, it is often the quality of the water, and quite regularly the cocktail of chemicals that the fish are soaked in for days. Before reaching for 'multi-cure' antibiotics, try making the environment that the fish are living in, more suitable for all fish.

Happy fish rarely get sick, so the cause of most sicknesses could be due to the poor water quality and not any disease.

Overall, it is in your best interest and that of the fish in your care, to have your water tested for more than just pH, and use a good quality water conditioner. If you notice that something is not quite right, then do what is necessary to eliminate any causes before trying to cover up the symptoms.

Hope this helps.

Cheers mate

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