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Mini Reef


Mr. TD

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Koko and i have started a mini reef tank. It's 12 gallons, and has 15 pounds of live sand and 12 pounds of live Fiji rock. We neen to let it cycle for 2 or 3 weeks, then we may start adding invertibrates. I'm really looking foreward to watching this tank grow.

I can't belive how many tanks we have now LOL.

Anyway, i took some pics of "Day one" of the reef tank :)

The tank was made for this, it has the filtration system built into the back, so there wasn't a whole lot of stuff to buy.

The maintenance is going to be A LOT easier than the goldfish, this tank will only need a few gallons changed per 2 or 3 weeks. (alot easier than i thought it would be.) The local fish store sells pre mixed marine water, which should make things easier.

:D

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So I did read right!! Saltwater! Why am I not surprised!... :rofl

Unfortunately, I can't view the pics, get an error message "You are not authorized to view this page".... :unsure:

What fish are you guys planning on putting in the tank?

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Wow, that looks so good!! What exactly did come with the tank - I read so much about skimmers and all that knick knack, is all that really neccessary? Are you planning on getting some corals? They come in such amazing colors.... :happydance

Those rocks are basically natural filtration, right?

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Wow, that looks so good!! What exactly did come with the tank - I read so much about skimmers and all that knick knack, is all that really neccessary? Are you planning on getting some corals? They come in such amazing colors.... :happydance

Those rocks are basically natural filtration, right?

The tank comes with the canopy and compact light, and a large marine filter built into the back. I don't know if the filter skims protien or not :unsure: We are going to use the live rock for now, maybe a bit of coral later. From what i understand the fiji rock does a lot of the natural filtration.

:pianobanana

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cool shots TD :thumb:

that is one heck of a unit you guys got there. looks pretty "high tech". built-in filter, huh? any chance of a brand name that i might be able to research. im very curious about that set-up in particular. :)

paul

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Very beautiful. :D You guys should get a starfish or a brittle star (not sure on spelling, the ones that look like a circle with spiky legs coming out). I think those are so cool! So are Seahorses although they always look a little sad in the tanks I think. Those tiny hermit crabs that walk all over the place- you have to get some of those!!!!

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cool shots TD! :thumb:

that is one heck of a unit you guys got there. looks pretty "high tech". built-in filter, huh? any chance of a brand name that i might be able to research. im very curious about that set-up in particular. :)

paul

It's a "nano cube" , made specifically for nano reefs. :)

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Very beautiful. :D You guys should get a starfish or a brittle star (not sure on spelling, the ones that look like a circle with spiky legs coming out). I think those are so cool! So are Seahorses although they always look a little sad in the tanks I think. Those tiny hermit crabs that walk all over the place- you have to get some of those!!!!

We are going to get algae eaters and detrius eaters (hermit crabs, starfish etc)

From what i understand, seahorses are very difficult to keep, and only for the more advanced, we are just begginers :)

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hi TD

i does livesand do the same as live rock ?

I think so, but the live rock comes with many hitchhikers that the sand does not....

Here's a cool article about all the different thing that may be present in live rock, some benificial, some detrimental...

http://www.reefs.org/hhfaq/pages/main_pages/faq_rock1.htm

:)

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Nice pics!

I considered marine when I got my tropical setup, but thought it would be too expensive and time-consuming. I wish we could get the nano-cube on this side of the pond!

Good luck with the tank, and keep the piccys rolling in!

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Guest starsmom

Congrats on the new tank guys!

I have a nano reef in an eclipse hex. I used to have a 55 gallon fish-only salt water, but got rid of it, waaaaay too much maintenance. I guess I am just lazy, don't like mixing and heating the water change water, especially for the 55, it was quite a chore, buckets EVERYWHERE.

Looks like you have a really nice set-up though. Be aware though, that a reef tank is not stable until 6 months minimum, you really have to watch all your parameters closely the first 6 months. Some easy things to get first are hermit crabs, snails, and featherduster worms, those are pretty much bullet-proof, or at least as much so as any salt-water creatures. The hermit crabs especially are fun to watch. Featherdusters, too, and of course all the little critters that come crawling out of the live rock and sand!

Best of luck!

Laura

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:D Congrats on the new salt-water tank-looks good allready!!! I have always wanted one myself,but talked myself out of it constantly thinking it was too expensive,and complex for me. Then I met a guy that does fantastic tank displays at a very nice lfs,that I 've only been to just once. He was very informative on the subject. He explained how much it 's gotten easier to set them up,and that you can actully find quite a few fish,etc. for a very reasonable price. I definitely would like to give it a shot.The things you could do!!!!!!! :D I like those nano-cubes,but you know how that goes..... ;) Upgrading would definately be tempting because of the so many beautiful fish available to pick from!!!!!!! :heart Good luck,and I'd love to see more pics for sure!
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Wow, you guys are brave! Like Starsmom said small tanks are difficult to keep stable, especially at the beginning. The most important thing with that tank (especially since it doenst have a lid) is making sure you top it off daily as the water evaporates. As the water evaporates the salt becomes more concentrated in the water and can kill inverts and especially corals.

What is the lighting like over that? We sell similar tanks (its the Via Aqua, right?). If you are going to do corals getting a protein skimmer would be a great idea. Most corals require about 3-5 watts of light per gallon so that sort of determines what you can keep. A lot of my friends at work are into reefs and they say xenia is one of the easiest soft corals to keep. Its pretty, nice and pink, and if you get pulsing xenia its really interesting to watch!

If you are looking for fish to put in there you may be able to get away with a small clownfish and maybe something like a pajama cardinal. A couple friends of mine at work have a 6 gallon reef with a cardinal and a few small corals.

Like any tank regular small water changes would be best, especially with inverts and corals (who can be very sensitive). Good luck and I look forward to seeing more pics as the tank gets established!!

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I don't know the lighting thing, but its a compacted light with the Actinic light to it.

Today was the first day of adding critters to the tank.....I have three snails and three Hermes.......My nitrates are at the 3.ppm mark so this is a start.

The interesting thing with Saltwater I have found is that you don't want nitrates in the tank at all for the animals to live right. Boy is this going to be a challenge :rofl

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Koko:

I found that with my nano-reef, I was getting a lot of nitrates. I was feeding a small pinch of saltwater flakes for the hermit crabs. I switched over to feeding small bits of raw shrimp from the seafood department instead, and had much lower nitrate levels...

And like jsrtist says, watch the salinity! It is amazing how fast it can rise in a small tank! I lost some snails to high salinity before I even realized what happened. A good thing to do is to take your salinity tester to the fish store with you. They usually have one of those expensive salinity meters there, and they can compare the results on your meter to theirs, and tell you how far yours is off, so you don't run into problems. That's how my snails died. The stupid plastic meter was off, I thought the salinity measured fine but it was actually high.

Oh, and Koko, you have let the rock and sand just be in the tank for a while before you're adding the critters right? I let mine be for a least a couple weeks, to get established. I was told to do it that way, and not put creatures in right away. But then again, my tank doesn't have a filter at all, just live rock and sand, the water circulates through the filter on the eclipse hood, but with no media and no biowheel. It is probably different with an actual filter.

Reef tanks are really a test of patience, especially the small ones, because it is so easy to upset the balance.

Anyhow, it is a really cool tank, and I'm sure you'll get it going great!

Laura

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Usually the hydrometer has to be calibrated, and it wont be accurate right away. What brand do you have? I think on one youre supposed to fill it with saltwater and let it sit for a day or so. It might be different for different ones.

I love the little marine hermit crabs! (Well, the land ones too!) I was telling the guys at work I want to set up a small marine tank just to keep those guys because theyre so entertaining.

Oh, and for the nitrates, its not bad to have a low amount in a fish-only system, but when you start doing corals and anemones and things you'll want to have a protein skimmer to get rid of it for you. Nitrates can be harmful in small amounts to sensitive invertebrates. Good luck on getting started, it sounds like it will be really fun! I wish I was allowed to have more tanks! :D

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jsrtist:

I just had one of those cheap plastic hydrometers. According the the guys at my fish stores, those are almost NEVER accurate. They had a refractometer, and used that to tell me how far my hydrometer was off.

I don't have a protein skimmer on my tank, it's way too small for that! I thought with reefs, you didn't protein skim? Or maybe that's reef tanks with no fish. I had a skimmer on my fish only, and was amazed at the gunk that accumulated!

Laura

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Guest wrasseman01

hello, I work with jenny and the tank you have is the 12 gallon nano cube with the 32 watt "smart" light. I hope I'm right in that. good corals to start with would be,

brain coral, zooantids, mushrooms, hammers, torch, trumpets, leathers and bubble corals.

Things to stay away from would be all SPS corals, goniopora (flowerpot) they rarley live more than a few months, xenia until the tank has been set-up for at least six months (plus it can really take over if it like the conditins of your tank :D ) clams, sponges, scallops, chocolate chip stars or any that look similar (they eat everything), green or yellow brittle stars they catch and eat fish, crabs (except for emerald crabs), nudibranchs, most cucumbers ( highly toxic), sea anemones., horseshoe crabs (get huge).

Easy inverts include shrimp, hermits (the dwarf blue ones are excellent), feather dusters, tigertail cucumbers (one safe one), snails and most cowries.

I know such a small list following such a large one.

Some suitable fish would include but is not limited to grammas, psuedos, small cardinals, pipefish, mandarins (after six months), dwarf lions, seahorses (captive bred), gobies, small clowns, blennies, assesors, and frogfish.

Try and stay away from damsels most are just too territorial for a small tank.

Protien skimmers are definitly of great help but not absolutely needed.

Enjoy, keep us updated.

Aaron

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