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Guest Ray

Goldfish Breeding

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Guest Ray

Hi, I'm a brand new member and after reading a number of the post I came to this site like many other members - HELP I have babies! I have bred a number of cichlids before in indoor aquariums but it did catch me offguard when I noticed in our pond of 1000 gallons that the 6 goldfish which I've had in there for a couple of years have bred. By the time I noticed, the fry were mixed in size from a 1/2" to 1". The fish are a mix of a couple of carnival refugee comets and a couple of neighbors unwanted shubunkins that they wanted me to take after they gave up on fishkeeping. The female is a shubunkin and the male is a comet (was 1/2 black and 1/2 orange a year ago now all orange - question for another day).

I have done a decent amount of reading on this site but I can't seem to find the answer to this question. "How often do they breed and length of the season?" "Can I extend the breeding season or frequency if I isolate the couple and move them indoors? " I did notice in a post someone had mentioned as many as 6 times in 2 months! They are both about 4" w/o the tail. Other info if it helps determine breeding intervals -the pond is located along the coastal area of So. Calif. so the temperatures remain fairly mild. The pond is the basin for a fountain which currently is not running and I've only been doing weekly 1/4 water changes. Aquatic bog plants in containers are in the pond along with some floating anacharis. Unfortunately my son and I just put about 8 tadpoles (not bullfrogs but small) that we caught in the pond too.

I want to be prepared with breeding mops and a flat to raise the fry next time they spawn. Unfortunately I don't have the luxury to be checking on the pond daily so any help and advice you can offer me on my questions will be very helpful in my preparation.

Thanks,

Ray

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:hi welcome to koko's Ray

Can I extend the breeding season or frequency if I isolate the couple and move them indoors?

i think this could easily be done if you move them into an aquarium with a heater

however, in saying that i don't think its actual neccessary to do this because they

will breed several times during the summer and spring and the female fish

may lay 100s of eggs each time

breeding mops are great but if you dont manage to remove it, the goldfish could

eat most of the eggs within a day so maybe you should keep the pond heavily planted and allow the fry to spawn naturally ( ive read from another site that you should leave on 30% of surface area exposed to direct sunlight)

since you have already had success with this

goodluck with the breeding!!!

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Guest noahnjm

Make sure you have the room to raise the fry! Someday I wish that my goldfish would breed! Their to small right now for them though...

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Guest Orandaman

That's a really good question. I'm a little unclear about it too. Some say their fish spawn in early spring and some reported in late summer. I think it has to do with the seasonal change in length of day and temperature. The goldfish will respond to the change season.

Some breed of fish will lay eggs during a span of a few day and some reported they spawn for 2 months or more. I suppose whenever the female lay all her eggs is when it stops. When there is no male to coax her to lay the eggs she may becomd egg bound.

So, I think the answer may vary depending on many factors.

It sounds like you are doing a lot of research on your own and doing a good job at it. Please share some of the information with us and keep us updated from time to time. I like to learn more about raising fish in ponds too.

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Guest Ray

Hi, thanks eveyone for your advice. a brief update - over the weekend I unraveled some black nylon rope (tip from this site) i had in the garage. After putting up with my wife rolling her eyeballs during this process and my son putting the improvised breeding mop on his head like dreadlocks I put them in the pond. Explaining the reason for the mops to my 9 year old son and how the parents will eat the eggs and fry he said "what horrible parents!" Some of the mops are on the surface and others in upright positions fastened to the bottom. Partial water change on Saturday and on Sunday am they were chasing each other all over the pond! But no eggs yet or at least stuck to my mops. I might try a nylon net parallel to and just above the bottom to see if that might catch any eggs before they hit the bottom where I can't see them.

I also discovered I've been lucky enough to have 3 males and 3 females. Turbercles on one white shubunkin were hard to spot and the 3rd male just developed his in the past week. The females all have the described body shape and during the chasing Sunday morning all the females were being chased - my tranquil pond has turned into the Playboy mansion for goldfish!

As a tip for others on the site if not already discussed elsewhere the visibility of the tubercles varies greatly on the same fish as well. I'll keep you posted on any successes

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Guest Ray

To update anyone interested the fish have bred again. In a pond it is very difficult to isolate or even recognize the eggs in my experience so far. I've bred a variety of cichlids in the past and could easily spot the eggs in a clean aquarium. Eggs in the pond resemble a mucous like substance all over the roots of the plants. During their spawning algae and waste that gets kicked up during the chasing quickly sticks to the mass and makes it even more difficult to ID the eggs.

I caught 5 of the 3/4 to 1 & 1/4" fish and put them in an indoor tank to keep them safe. I set up another tank now with 50 fry that are a few days old. I'm feeding them egg yolk, along with keeping an algae covered rock from the pond and anacharis from the pond as well. I could not see them since they were hiding for their lives in the roots of the plants so I check by taking a clean Costco sized butter container and dipping it in next to the plant roots and any fry in hiding will end up in the container.

Lastly while catching the fry I noticed some dragonfly molts on some of the reeds around the pond. Now I need to do some reading if they can eat the fry as well.

Ray

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looks like the frys are keeping you busy

the eggs are really hard to spot in my pond because they are so small and

the water is brownish in colour so it really camouflages them

but i usually know when they are going to spawn and separate them

in special enclosure and they usually lay their eggs on the plants i put in

it saves all the hassle of having to find them

so is there any chance that you can post some pics of pond

i love ponds, so much so im currently upgrading :happydance

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Guest Ray

Thanks for the information. I was considering doing something similar. It is difficult for me to determine which combo of the 3 males and 3 females are going to breed so it is hard to isolate a pair. That is another question too whether a pair can get them all to breed simultaneously because when they are chasing each other they are all in the fray. My pond is circular and watching the chase is like watching slot cars going around minature racetrack with the males switching the females they are chasing and in different combinations. As I said in an earlier post it turns from tranquil to a chaotic chase.

So I am going to make a pen for the fry. One area of the pond has more roots and cover for the fry so I want to isolate that area. My plan is to make the pen out of PVC sprinkler fittings and cover it with nylon window screen material with a size large enough for the fry to pass through but keeping the bigger fish out. The mesh would also serve as a medium for the eggs to adhere to. That way I can keep the fry in the pond.

Sorry no pics our digital camera is out of commission. I could take a 35mm print and scan it into a PDF format but not sure how to transfer it on the site.

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Guest Ray

I made the pen out of PVC fittings from Home Depot. There may be a better mesh available but the one I used that is working great is a black plastic mesh called "Bird Block" made to drape over gardens to keep the birds out. Large mesh size to allow good water flow but small enough to keep out the larger fish. Inexpensive too.

In order to camoflage the PVC I went to Michaels crafts store and purchased some plastic vines to cover the PVC. Caution: most of the plants there have wire in them - at least in the base. Look hard enough and there are certain ones that are all plastic so they will not harm your water quality. The one I bought is a 3' vine that is rolled up for $7. I bought one for extra plants to decorate my indoor aquariums as well. Much cheaper than buying plants from the pet store.

Ray

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Ray, looks like you got it figured out! The DIY pen is a great idea, I did something similar for my husband's koi babies, although I used simple pond netting instead of the bird block, since the fry was already too big to fit through the holes.

How old are they now? An estimate on the total numbers? :)

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Guest Ray

Thanks Andrea. Currently in the house we have the two original fish that when I finally saw them hiding in the roots that alerted me to the fact they've been spawning. They are now 1 and 1/4" and the other is 3/4". The fry tank has roughly 50 fry 1/4 to 3/8" in size. Not sure of the amounts in the pond due to all the roots and structure. Seems every time I go outside and dunk a container next to a plant root I will get a fry or two though even though I never saw them . Just no more room inside so hopefully the pen will work ok.

Question for you. Do you know of a paint that I can use to paint something and submerse it in the pond that is safe? I thought a latex brush on or spray enamel paint from the hardware store would be OK as long as I let it properly dry and cure. Thanks again

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im not too sure about the enamel paint

but i know there is a special paint that can be used in a pond

i manage to read the back of the can and says that its fish safe

thats the one you want ;)

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