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Swimbladder problem


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  • Regular Member

Hi all, 

I’ve had this guy outside in my 130G pond for about 5 (?) years with no issues, but I noticed him upside down during the winter, he obviously wasn’t active so I left him be however as the weather’s warmed up he’s still the same even with larger more frequent water changes so I’ve moved him indoors to a 10G hospital tank.

 

Test Results for the Following:

 Ammonia Level(Tank) 0ppm

 Nitrite Level(Tank) 0ppm

 Nitrate level(Tank) 20ppm

 Ammonia Level(Tap)0ppm

 Nitrite Level(Tap) 0ppm

 Nitrate level(Tap) 20ppm

 Ph Level, Tank (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines) 7.6

 Ph Level, Tap (If possible, KH, GH and chloramines) 7.6

Other Required Info:

 Brand of test-kit used and whether strips or drops? API Master

 Water temperature? 18c / 64F

 Tank size (how many gals.) and how long has it been running? Normally in 130G pond, now in 10G hospital set up today

 What is the name and "size of the filter"(s)? DIY bog filtration, about 3x turnover per hour and holds approx 60L

 How often do you change the water and how much? Normally 10% a week bumped up to about 50% for last few weeks

 How many days ago was the last water change and how much did you change?

5 days ago 80% and mulm cleaned from bottom

 How many fish in the tank and their size?

1 oranda about 5”

 What kind of water additives or conditioners?

Seachem Safe

 What do you feed your fish and how often?

Mostly lives on live food, pellets fed every few days

 Any new fish added to the tank? No

 Any medications added to the tank? No

 List entire medication/treatment history for fish and tank.Please include salt, Prazi, PP, etc and the approximate time and duration of treatment.

No medication

 Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt," bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus?

Fin rot which appears to be healing

 Any unusual behavior like staying at the bottom, not eating, etc.?

Pinned upside down to top of tank, C shape maybe?

Thank you!

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Dang!

Well if the fish is in a C shape that is very bad news. Can this fish even get upright?

First you can do is lower the water level a little so the fish isnt struggling to be up so far. Also can you find some duckweed? Duckweed can help with swimbladder issues, that of course if the fish is still eating 😮 

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  • Regular Member
9 hours ago, koko said:

Dang!

Well if the fish is in a C shape that is very bad news. Can this fish even get upright?

First you can do is lower the water level a little so the fish isnt struggling to be up so far. Also can you find some duckweed? Duckweed can help with swimbladder issues, that of course if the fish is still eating 😮 

Weirdly enough he’s eating fine! He can get upright it’s just a struggle for him. 

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  • Regular Member

He doesn't look "C" shaped. He just looks to have permanent spine curvature from being upside down. This often happens in fish with severe swimming problems. Unfortunately, with fish this size and age... even swim bladder problems are usually permanent and irreversible. Oftentimes fasting or feeding an incomplete diet can temporarily help, but even these will take a toll on the fish eventually.

In the future - fish with cold water flip over need to be removed immediately and NOT PUT BACK until winter is over. It is a sign of weakness and the sooner they're removed, the better the chance that they recover normally.

I do not have long term indoor space for weak fish so any weak fish I have are claimed by the winter or euthanized... but if there is an option to move a flipped over fish, it's likely a wise move if you are adamant about the fishes survival.

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  • Regular Member
11 hours ago, mjfromga said:

He doesn't look "C" shaped. He just looks to have permanent spine curvature from being upside down. This often happens in fish with severe swimming problems. Unfortunately, with fish this size and age... even swim bladder problems are usually permanent and irreversible. Oftentimes fasting or feeding an incomplete diet can temporarily help, but even these will take a toll on the fish eventually.

In the future - fish with cold water flip over need to be removed immediately and NOT PUT BACK until winter is over. It is a sign of weakness and the sooner they're removed, the better the chance that they recover normally.

I do not have long term indoor space for weak fish so any weak fish I have are claimed by the winter or euthanized... but if there is an option to move a flipped over fish, it's likely a wise move if you are adamant about the fishes survival.

Thank you for replying! That’s something I didn’t know, but honestly I think I’m done with fancies after my current lot.

I’ll probably make the move to euthanise soon.

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This fish is actually quite tough. He is 5+ years old which many don't make it to firstly. And also usually - cold water flip over leads to a type of coma and death, he managed to survive it and just never recovered from the flip over.

As for being done with fancies, I can totally understand that. Many have left fancies alone because they're just too fragile.

I had a batch from Bo Zhao earlier this year and they made it through quarantine fine (tho a few were small and weak) but I've lost a few randomly. They just didn't adjust to the outdoor situation. None of my older fish have had any issues, but I won't be getting anymore fancies either. I'll just let mine live out their lives. 

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1 hour ago, mjfromga said:

This fish is actually quite tough. He is 5+ years old which many don't make it to firstly. And also usually - cold water flip over leads to a type of coma and death, he managed to survive it and just never recovered from the flip over.

As for being done with fancies, I can totally understand that. Many have left fancies alone because they're just too fragile.

I had a batch from Bo Zhao earlier this year and they made it through quarantine fine (tho a few were small and weak) but I've lost a few randomly. They just didn't adjust to the outdoor situation. None of my older fish have had any issues, but I won't be getting anymore fancies either. I'll just let mine live out their lives. 

I’m one of the lucky few that usually has long lived fancies (10+ year old telescope and two 5 year old orandas) but I’ve had enough of swimbladder problems. Such a shame the winter got him this time.

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