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  • Regular Member

I always feed peas, but the other day I fed zuchinni and lettuce (mainly for my pig-face snails). The next time I tested my params, the ph was really low...like off the chart low, below 6.2. Now don't panic, my ph is ALWAYS LOW...it's a normal thing in my tank for the ph to be at 6.5-6.8 and my fish flourish. But now it's just off the charts low! I did a 40-50% water change last night, checked the ph today, and it's exactly the same. I guess my question is: was the crash from the veggies? Do I have to start using coral and all that jazz now? Has my ph lowered toooo much now? I was mentally okay with my ph being 6.5, but now that it's below 6.2....ughhh. The fish are fine though, like I said, not to worry.

Thanks guys!

:pigs

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  • Regular Member

As long as the pH stays constant, there should be no problem. That is quite strange that it took such a dip though.

I do not think it was the veggies though... I could be wrong too though.

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Guest ed586

I've heard driftwood can really lower PH but takes time for it to take effect. I don't know about the veggies, but I would think oranges or tomatoes would lower the PH since they're acidic.

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Guest Ceridwen

Have you retested your tap water for both pH and KH? It could be your tap water has changed from having some KH to having none recently, even if the pH did not change by much.

Having a low pH isn't a big deal, but having a very low KH can be dangerous, as that is what makes you vulnerable to pH crashes. Check your KH, and if its too low I would add baking soda or coral. My KH from the tap is 1, so I buffer with coral to get it to 3-4.

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Guest ed586

I know. :idea

You could:

1. Fill a bucket.

2. Test your water out of your tap.

3. Feed the bucket some veggies.

4. Wait a day.

5. Retest and that will tell you if they effect PH.

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  • Regular Member

I've never had veggies make my pH drop, and I feed a lot of them, including zucchini and lettuce. I do agree with Ceridwen to check your kh if you haven't already, and add a buffer like coral if its low. Good luck! :)

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Guest ed586

I agree with the buffering, but I've always been leary about messing with PH or KH. Anyone know of how much or how little? I haven't seen any guidelines on this. Just a thought. :hmm :

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Guest Ceridwen

For a normal tank, 2 degrees of KH or greater is normally fine. If you want to inject co2 (not a common thing for goldfish folks ;) ) its best to have at least 3 and prefferably 4 degrees. If you are the type who slacks a lot on water changes, I would make sure you've got at least 3 degrees as KH is used up over time, and if it is not being replenished from water changes, you can eventually end up with a crash.

That btw, is one of the big reasons those people who "only change the water once a year and then it kills all the fish so they don't want to do more water changes" kill all their fish. The pH will be very low or high in the tank (usually low I believe) before the change, and the shock the fish to death when they finally change it...reinforcing their silly idea that it's better for the fish not to change the water. /sigh

The more I've read up on all the pH/KH/GH stuff, the more mystified I become at how much of a pain it can be to find tests for KH, which is a VERY important value. I can find GH test kits all over though, and that value is normally of minimal use. In roughly 20 pet/fish stores I've been to in Orlando and Pensacola, I've found only 3 carrying a KH test kit. Ironically, most of the stupid strips have KH on there, I just don't trust them to be accurate.

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