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Red splotches all over? What's wrong here?


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  • Regular Member

Hello, People Of Koko's. I haven't been on lately, but everything has been going great goldfish-wise until last night.

 

LATE LAST NIGHT

TED: "Wow, Blunderbuss really IS getting a lot of orange on him! Not just that spot on his tail!" 

ME (in bed and half asleep): "Huh, he's changing pretty fast then. Cool; well, I guess I'll see in the morning."

 

Turns out Blunderbuss was actually covered in red splotches which looked like extra orange patches under the night-light LED strip. Looked bruised all over except his head-lumps, but acted perfectly normal, energetically "blub-blub"ing at me trying to intimidate me into feeding him, just like always.

 

There is nothing at all amiss with either of his fellow goldfish.

 

  • OLD TANK WATER AMMONIA: 0 ppm
  • OLD TANK WATER NITRITE: 0.25-0.50 ppm
  • OLD TANK WATER NITRATE: 40 ppm
  • OLD TANK WATER pH: 7.0
  • TAP WATER AMMONIA: 0.5 ppm
  • TAP WATER NITRITE: 0 ppm
  • TAP WATER NITRATE: 5.0 ppm
  • TAP WATER pH: 7.5 (because the standard pH test said 7.6, and the high pH test said 7.4)
    • Brand of test-kit used and whether strips or drops? API Freshwater Master Test Kit, drops.
    • Water temperature? 68 F/20 C
    • Tank size (how many gals.) and how long has it been running? 45 gallon tank, established in early 2012, in its current location since November 2015.
    • What is the name and size of the filters? There's one Aquaclear 70 and one Aquaclear 30
    • How often do you change the water and how much? 90-95% water change every week (leaving only enough water to keep the fish covered). Every other week we take apart the filters to clean them, scrub the algae off the front of the tank, and squish out the major gunk from the moss balls.
  • How many days ago was the last water change and how much did you change? On Monday the 7th of November (a week ago) my partner Ted and I changed ~90-95% of the water. We changed the same amount today (and cleaned the filters and moss balls).
  • How many fish in the tank and their size? There are three. Blunderbuss (a lionhead) is nearly 6" long, with a body about the size of a kiwi fruit: this is the fish with the problem. Chippie (another lionhead who's the same age) is about 5" long and somewhat smaller than Blunderbuss. Valarie (a crown pearlscale who's two years younger) is about 2/3 the mass of Chippie at the same 5" length, because her tail is longer. (All lengths include tail, and all genders are my best guesses based on their vents.)
  • What kind of water additives or conditioners? Prime.
  • What do you feed your fish and how often? Five days a week, I feed them two or three small (half tablespoon sized) meals, of Hikari Gold and/or thawed seaweed-based cubes made for saltwater herbivores.  One day a week, I feed them a thawed cube containing either brine shrimp, blood worms, or gelled seaweed stuff. The day before I change their water each week is a fast day.
  • Any new fish added to the tank? Not in two years: that was the pearlscale and she was properly quarantined (see below).
  • Any medications added to the tank? Not since four years ago when I first got the lionheads (see below).
  • List entire medication/treatment history for fish and tank. I used the standard Koko's Prazipro/salt treatment when I first brought home the (originally 3) lionheads in July 2012. I bought Valarie in the summer of 2014 (several months after one of the three lionheads died from some horrible pus-filled blister problem). Before adding the pearlscale to the tank I quarantined her in a Sterilite tub following the same Prazipro/salt method.
  • Any unusual findings on the fish such as "grains of salt," bloody streaks, frayed fins or fungus? Blunderbuss's solid white body is heavily splotched with red marks and his pelvic and pectoral fins have red STREAKS. There are also two or three small inflamed blood vessels on his tail, but the STREAKS are something different. However, all his scales lay flat with no hint of pine-coning. Nothing whatsoever is wrong with other two goldfish.
  • * Any unusual behavior like staying at the bottom, not eating, etc.? No, Blunderbuss has been acting like a vicious little bulldog, exactly like he always does, this entire time.

 

I WILL POST PICTURES BELOW, my browser is acting up and I don't want to lose all what I've already typed.

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 Okay, it's not letting me copy, click on, or otherwise interact with the individual photos' HTML codes. Can't figure out how to fix it, and Ted has even disabled the flash plug-in whatever and it's still not complying.

 

Here's the album link. Can you access it?

http://s1077.photobucket.com/user/adverbemonade/library/BLUNDERBUSS%20PROBLEM%2014TH%20NOVEMBER%202016?sort=3&page=1

 

Blunderbuss came to me as a nearly perfect tanchu, and then he slowly lost all his red except for the tiniest spot on the rim of his right eye. A small streak of orange has appeared on the top half of his left caudal fin within the last six months. Every other marking you see on him in the pictures is NOT NORMAL, he is supposed to be almost entirely white.

 

Also, I took those pictures AFTER the water change, and the splotches had faded noticeably in that short time. They looked even worse before!

 

Currently, his splotches have faded by about 75% overall, and the redness is more brownish now. I think the clean water is probably fixing it. I think he'll probably be okay.

 

However, I don't know what exactly went wrong there, I don't remember seeing anything comparable, and I want to prevent it in the future. Any advice would be much appreciated.

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  • Helper

Hi there! I have some thoughts.

The nitrite could definitely have done that. Are you regularly getting it or was that unusual? The nitrate could have also contributed to it as both a source of stress or actual chemical burns. Some fish can react even when others don't.

If you're getting that much nitrite and nitrate after just a week of tank water you could be really over feeding in addition to the really small tank. Fish that size would do better in a 60-80 gallon tank, but you can achieve much the same effect with two water changes weekly of the same size instead of one :)

Two maintenance rounds of prazi (four days of prazi, theee day break with clean water only, repeat the next week) are also a good idea to rule out flukes. Honestly though I'm pretty sure the poor water parameters may have been the issue more than anything else and they're super easy to fix - yay!

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Hi there! I have some thoughts.

The nitrite could definitely have done that. Are you regularly getting it or was that unusual? The nitrate could have also contributed to it as both a source of stress or actual chemical burns. Some fish can react even when others don't.

If you're getting that much nitrite and nitrate after just a week of tank water you could be really over feeding in addition to the really small tank. Fish that size would do better in a 60-80 gallon tank, but you can achieve much the same effect with two water changes weekly of the same size instead of one :)

Two maintenance rounds of prazi (four days of prazi, theee day break with clean water only, repeat the next week) are also a good idea to rule out flukes. Honestly though I'm pretty sure the poor water parameters may have been the issue more than anything else and they're super easy to fix - yay!

 

I must confess, I have been bad, haven't been testing as regularly as I should: week after week I had been getting the same pH and 0 on everything but nitrate (regularly 20 ppm) in the old water, so I got complacent.

 

I plan to get a larger tank when I can afford it, and I think I should do more frequent water changes until then. Every five days maybe? (I got these fish when they were very small, plus I had been following this forum's guidelines at the time.)

 

Thanks for your help.

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I wanted to say that sounded like a lot of food, but figured if it was, a moderator/helper would say it. Hope your fishy gets better soon.

 

I think you're right, and now I realize I got my measurements wrong: each time I feed them I feed them about half a TEASPOON, not tablespoon like I typed up there. I looked at the measuring spoons up in the kitchen, and saw that half a tablespoon is more than I feed them in an entire day. Can't imagine how bad those parameters would've been if I really fed them that much! D:

 

Thanks for your input, I appreciate it!

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  • Helper

Hi there! I have some thoughts.

The nitrite could definitely have done that. Are you regularly getting it or was that unusual? The nitrate could have also contributed to it as both a source of stress or actual chemical burns. Some fish can react even when others don't.

If you're getting that much nitrite and nitrate after just a week of tank water you could be really over feeding in addition to the really small tank. Fish that size would do better in a 60-80 gallon tank, but you can achieve much the same effect with two water changes weekly of the same size instead of one :)

Two maintenance rounds of prazi (four days of prazi, theee day break with clean water only, repeat the next week) are also a good idea to rule out flukes. Honestly though I'm pretty sure the poor water parameters may have been the issue more than anything else and they're super easy to fix - yay!

I must confess, I have been bad, haven't been testing as regularly as I should: week after week I had been getting the same pH and 0 on everything but nitrate (regularly 20 ppm) in the old water, so I got complacent.

I plan to get a larger tank when I can afford it, and I think I should do more frequent water changes until then. Every five days maybe? (I got these fish when they were very small, plus I had been following this forum's guidelines at the time.)

Thanks for your help.

I'd do Wednesday and Sunday, because that's easier for me to remember. You should only have to knock crud off your filters and such every week or two though. And do try cutting the feeding volume in half at each feed and see if you still show nitrite.

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  • Regular Member

 

 

Hi there! I have some thoughts.

The nitrite could definitely have done that. Are you regularly getting it or was that unusual? The nitrate could have also contributed to it as both a source of stress or actual chemical burns. Some fish can react even when others don't.

If you're getting that much nitrite and nitrate after just a week of tank water you could be really over feeding in addition to the really small tank. Fish that size would do better in a 60-80 gallon tank, but you can achieve much the same effect with two water changes weekly of the same size instead of one :)

Two maintenance rounds of prazi (four days of prazi, theee day break with clean water only, repeat the next week) are also a good idea to rule out flukes. Honestly though I'm pretty sure the poor water parameters may have been the issue more than anything else and they're super easy to fix - yay!

I must confess, I have been bad, haven't been testing as regularly as I should: week after week I had been getting the same pH and 0 on everything but nitrate (regularly 20 ppm) in the old water, so I got complacent.

I plan to get a larger tank when I can afford it, and I think I should do more frequent water changes until then. Every five days maybe? (I got these fish when they were very small, plus I had been following this forum's guidelines at the time.)

Thanks for your help.

I'd do Wednesday and Sunday, because that's easier for me to remember. You should only have to knock crud off your filters and such every week or two though. And do try cutting the feeding volume in half at each feed and see if you still show nitrite.

 

 

Thanks, I think that schedule will work out well!

 

(Had you seen the post where I corrected my measurement? I had incorrectly said I was feeding them half a TABLESPOON each time, but I should have typed "teaspoon." I am not feeding them such a ridiculous amount of food, but if it would be best to reduce it, please let me know.)

 

Blunderbuss is now almost splotch-free now. He and the other two are pretty much out for the night, lined up together in the customary sleeping corner.

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Please give an estimate of the standard length (tail not included) of each fish.  Tails do not affect the bioload.

 

To get a picture in your post, select one picture.  To the right of the picture you see a box with a url in it.  Click on the box.  It turns yellow and says "copied."  Click where you want the picture and hit control v.  You get this:

 

100_0152_zpsknoqrkp1.jpg

 

 

Just FYI, I feed a mature fish 1/4 teaspoon of pellets a day, and I have large plump fish.  My fish live in ponds so they can nibble on algae all day long, so they do get added nutrients there.  I lower the amount I feed in the fall when the water temperature gets down to what you have in your aquarium.

 

It looks like Blunderbuss has bacterial infections of wounds from an external parasite infection.  The bacteria that cause such infections normally feed on organic waste in the tank, but if their population gets large enough they can start feeding on the fish, creating lesions.  Overfeeding can result in bacterial "blooms."  

 

So, basically repeating what Arctic Mama said:

 

Double your water changes.

 

Cut the amount you feed daily in half, but please feed daily.  In nature, goldfish forage for food every waking minute, so getting nothing for a whole day stresses them.

 

Clean your filter with every water change.  If you do this, cleaning takes little effort. Vigorously clean the sponges or other mechanical filtration, but just rinse any muck from the biomedium and the filter walls.  Dirty sponges grow decay bacteria, which use up the oxygen your nitrifiers need, and can result in measurable nitrite or ammonia in your tank.

 

As long as you have measurable nitrite, add 1 tablespoon of aquarium salt or other 100% NaCl to the water at each water change.  This protects the fish from nitrite damage.

 

Treat the tank with prazi for 2 weeks.

 

If the red spots don't continue to heal, we can do some salt dips, but cleaner water may do the trick.

 

 

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