Jump to content

New Pond Build!


Reds12

Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

Hello!

I used to frequent this board a while back but its been probably about a year since I've been here.  I hadn't realized how long its been since I had changed anything on my pond or in my tanks!

Anyways, we just bought a new house so need to move my outdoor fish.  They're currently in an above ground but since we have some time to move into our new house before we have to move out of the old one I want to take the time to build an in-ground pond.

I could definitely use some advice or opinions!

I have an area in the yard that already has walls - the back side is a concrete/cinder block retaining wall and the front side is a garden retaining wall (approx 1 foot high)  I would dig a few feet below that wall.  Basically I'd like to dig out part of the garden and put the pond in there behind the garden wall.  

This is what I'd like to do -

- epdm liner
- skimmer on one side
- waterfall filter box on opposite side of skimmer - hopefully a bog filter in it if possible
- gravity bottom drain that goes into the skimmer (we're in a drought zone so dumping that water is a waste and isn't an option)

But do I do a settling tank as well?  Do I do an aerated bottom drain?  I'd rather not because of the extra supplies I'd need to purchase and I'd like to stick to a budget, so if the water movement from the waterfall will be enough that'd be great (I can also add another small pump I already have with a venturi injector into the pond to help with circulation/oxygenation if necessary)

How big should I make it?  The width will be at a maximum about 3.5-4 feet because the space is limited but can be as wide as 20 feet.  I can only go about 2.5 feet into the soil (plus the 1 foot of wall so 3.5 feet deep total) BUT I can always raise the retaining wall if needed.

Any tips or advice from experience you would give someone building their first in-ground pond?

I will be putting into the pond - 4 juvenile Koi (I may need to re-home a couple as they get larger but for now they stay with me), 8 adult pond goldfish, 2 fancy goldfish and a few babies (which I plan to re-home eventually but I'd like the space for them just in case I end up keeping them)


Thanks in advance!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Helper

I'm no good with ponds but am excited to see what you and the pond pros come up with! Lots of members here have experience in this and it sounds like you're on the right track.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I have an area in the yard that already has walls - the back side is a concrete/cinder block retaining wall and the front side is a garden retaining wall (approx 1 foot high)  I would dig a few feet below that wall.  Basically I'd like to dig out part of the garden and put the pond in there behind the garden wall.  

 

I don't know how this area looks.  A picture would help.  I strongly recommend a minimum of 2-3 feet of access on each side of the pond if possible.

This is what I'd like to do -

- epdm liner yes

- skimmer on one side yes

- waterfall filter box on opposite side of skimmer not adequate filtration you might consider a barrel filter or two that sit behind the water fall or somewhere else with a pipe to the waterfall. - hopefully a bog filter in it if possible  have you considered aquaponic grow beds which have lower maintenance and provide better phytofiltration than a traditional bog filter?

- gravity bottom drain yes that goes into the skimmer no, to the settling tank. (we're in a drought zone so dumping that water is a waste and isn't an option)

But do I do a settling tank as well?  Yes, to remove solid waste that will foul your biofilter.   Do I do an aerated bottom drain?  Probably not, but the aeration will improve the flow from the bottom drain to the settling tank.  I'd rather not because of the extra supplies I'd need to purchase and I'd like to stick to a budget, so if the water movement from the waterfall will be enough that'd be great (I can also add another small pump I already have with a venturi injector into the pond to help with circulation/oxygenation if necessary)

How big should I make it?  The width will be at a maximum about 3.5-4 feet because the space is limited but can be as wide as 20 feet.  I can only go about 2.5 feet into the soil (plus the 1 foot of wall so 3.5 feet deep total) BUT I can always raise the retaining wall if needed.  20x4x4 gives you 2400 gallons which should handle your proposed fish load and give you room for the others that will turn up.  :)  I suggest raising the sides to 18-20" which makes sitting on the edge very comfortable. Koi people say their fish need four feet of water, which may be an exaggeration.  You do need 3 feet of depth to keep predatory birds from standing on the bottom and devouring the fish.

Any tips or advice from experience you would give someone building their first in-ground pond?  Draw plans.  Submit them to a forum or forums for critique.  Draw new plans. submit...  Continue until you have all the bugs out.  Then build.

I will be putting into the pond - 4 juvenile Koi (I may need to re-home a couple as they get larger but for now they stay with me), 8 adult pond goldfish, 2 fancy goldfish and a few babies (which I plan to re-home eventually but I'd like the space for them just in case I end up keeping them) Figure a minimum of 250 gallons per koi and 20 gallons per goldfish.

 

Think of a water flow like this.  Pond > bottom drain > settling tank (in a filter pit) > pump or biofilter > biofilter or pump > bog filter or grow bed > waterfall > pond.  In parallel: pond > skimmer > biofilter > pond.

 

I'll try to find some good diagrams for you.  They aren't easy to find.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I'm no good with ponds but am excited to see what you and the pond pros come up with! Lots of members here have experience in this and it sounds like you're on the right track.

 

Thanks!  I'm excited too but a little nervous since I'm not really sure what I'm doing.  Yikes!  Hopefully I can figure this out...worst case I'll have to set up a temp home for them while I build.

Welcome back!!!!

Thank you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

 

I have an area in the yard that already has walls - the back side is a concrete/cinder block retaining wall and the front side is a garden retaining wall (approx 1 foot high)  I would dig a few feet below that wall.  Basically I'd like to dig out part of the garden and put the pond in there behind the garden wall.  

 

I don't know how this area looks.  A picture would help.  I strongly recommend a minimum of 2-3 feet of access on each side of the pond if possible.

This is what I'd like to do -

- epdm liner yes

- skimmer on one side yes

- waterfall filter box on opposite side of skimmer not adequate filtration you might consider a barrel filter or two that sit behind the water fall or somewhere else with a pipe to the waterfall. - hopefully a bog filter in it if possible  have you considered aquaponic grow beds which have lower maintenance and provide better phytofiltration than a traditional bog filter?

- gravity bottom drain yes that goes into the skimmer no, to the settling tank. (we're in a drought zone so dumping that water is a waste and isn't an option)

But do I do a settling tank as well?  Yes, to remove solid waste that will foul your biofilter.   Do I do an aerated bottom drain?  Probably not, but the aeration will improve the flow from the bottom drain to the settling tank.  I'd rather not because of the extra supplies I'd need to purchase and I'd like to stick to a budget, so if the water movement from the waterfall will be enough that'd be great (I can also add another small pump I already have with a venturi injector into the pond to help with circulation/oxygenation if necessary)

How big should I make it?  The width will be at a maximum about 3.5-4 feet because the space is limited but can be as wide as 20 feet.  I can only go about 2.5 feet into the soil (plus the 1 foot of wall so 3.5 feet deep total) BUT I can always raise the retaining wall if needed.  20x4x4 gives you 2400 gallons which should handle your proposed fish load and give you room for the others that will turn up.   :)  I suggest raising the sides to 18-20" which makes sitting on the edge very comfortable. Koi people say their fish need four feet of water, which may be an exaggeration.  You do need 3 feet of depth to keep predatory birds from standing on the bottom and devouring the fish.

Any tips or advice from experience you would give someone building their first in-ground pond?  Draw plans.  Submit them to a forum or forums for critique.  Draw new plans. submit...  Continue until you have all the bugs out.  Then build.

I will be putting into the pond - 4 juvenile Koi (I may need to re-home a couple as they get larger but for now they stay with me), 8 adult pond goldfish, 2 fancy goldfish and a few babies (which I plan to re-home eventually but I'd like the space for them just in case I end up keeping them) Figure a minimum of 250 gallons per koi and 20 gallons per goldfish.

 

Think of a water flow like this.  Pond > bottom drain > settling tank (in a filter pit) > pump or biofilter > biofilter or pump > bog filter or grow bed > waterfall > pond.  In parallel: pond > skimmer > biofilter > pond.

 

I'll try to find some good diagrams for you.  They aren't easy to find.  

 

I have not considered a grow bed but I'm open to alternatives so I'll look into that.

I've done up a (very) basic diagram...I could easily replace the bog with a grow bed if decided.  I can always make up some space by transferring plants currently in that location to other parts of the yard too if I need to.  I'm going to estimate 15 feet long instead of 20 because I'll need some space for all the equipment - so I should have 1600+ gallons in the pond.  I'll definitely need the depth since there are herons in my area so I'll probably go the full 4 feet deep.  I also might need to consider a cover.

When I go over to the new property later I'll get a couple photos and accurate measurements.  If it doesn't work I'm sure another location will work.  This is just a beautiful spot because its next to the pool right near a little sitting area (which means it'll be behind a safety fence where my son and dogs can't mess with it when I'm not there, haha)

http://i1292.photobucket.com/albums/b565/stacie1/pond_zpsaj0dgiya.jpg 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

pond_zpsaj0dgiya.jpg

 

Thanks for the picture.  With a long narrow pond, you want a "river flow" where water enters the pond at one end and exits at the other.  The resulting flow brings the debris to the bottom drain which should be at the far right of the pond.  This allows a short pipe from the bottom drain to the settling tank in the filter pit at the right end of the pond.  Next to the settling tank, you can have a biofilter that receives water from the top of the settling tank by gravity  and a pump takes the water from the biofilter to an above ground bog/ grow beds at the other end of the pond; or you can pump the water from the top of the settling tank to an above-ground biofilter at the other end of the pond.  The water from the skimmer has very little solid waste, so this water can go to a biofilter or even to the bog/grow beds.

 

If, as your picture suggests, the bog filter serves as a biofilter as well as for phytofiltration, it needs an area at least 30% of the area of the pond.  Alternatively, your filtration system should have a volume at least 10% of the pond volume.  You can actually have the above ground filtration in another part of the yard, pumping the water to the filter area and gravity draining it back to the pond.

 

I recommend biofiltration to phytofiltration rather than trying to get both in one.  Much lower maintenance. 

 



pond_zpsaj0dgiya.jpg

 

Thanks for the picture.  With a long narrow pond, you want a "river flow" where water enters the pond at one end and exits at the other.  The resulting flow brings the debris to the bottom drain which should be at the far right of the pond.  This allows a short pipe from the bottom drain to the settling tank in the filter pit at the right end of the pond.  Next to the settling tank, you can have a biofilter that receives water from the top of the settling tank by gravity  and a pump takes the water from the biofilter to an above ground bog/ grow beds at the other end of the pond; or you can pump the water from the top of the settling tank to an above-ground biofilter at the other end of the pond.  The water from the skimmer has very little solid waste, so this water can go to a biofilter or even to the bog/grow beds.

 

If, as your picture suggests, the bog filter serves as a biofilter as well as for phytofiltration, it needs an area at least 30% of the area of the pond.  Alternatively, your filtration system should have a volume at least 10% of the pond volume.  You can actually have the above ground filtration in another part of the yard, pumping the water to the filter area and gravity draining it back to the pond.

 

I recommend biofiltration to phytofiltration rather than trying to get both in one.  Much lower maintenance. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...