Jump to content

Setting up a goldfish pond


cmclien

Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

Hello Kokonuts :)

 

I'm still around, mostly on another forum these days with my tropical community tank.

 

But I decided to start a pond, and where else to go but here?

 

I am looking for input.  I have ordered a 100g cedar framed, stand alone pond, roughly 5.5ft by 4.5ft (hexagon shaped), 16 inches deep.

 

I ordered the Tetrapond filter and pump FK5 kit:

http://www.amazon.com/TetraPond-FK5-Filtration-Fountain-Kits/dp/B0024EE8US?ie=UTF8&keywords=tetrapond%20filter&qid=1464197321&ref_=sr_1_7&s=pet-supplies&sr=1-7

 

Barley straws

Power solar underwater color lights

Out door thermometer

 

My questions are am I missing anything?  I have prime of course.  I am going to use filter material from my 33g aquarium to seed the tank and plan on adding matrix as my tap water has high nitrates in the 30-40ppm range.

 

How many commons can this setup accomodate? 4? 5? ?  I don't want to overstock it.

 

Best floating nitrate absorbing plants that will provide cover for them?  I was also going to add in a few potted umbrella plants for additional shade.  And would like something that will bloom and is safe for them.

 

How do you keep nitrates in check in a pond?  besides the plants and matrix?  do you do water changes in a pond?  I wasn't sure on this.

 

In the winter I was planning on using a de-icer meant for water troughs so I can over winter them there.  It will freeze solid if I dont with that depth.  My understanding is a de-icer will keep the water around 40-45 degrees.  Is this a doable temperature for commons in the winter?

 

Thanks for your help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Since initially posting this I decided instead to go with the 165g pond which is the same dimensions at 64x55 hexagon, but deeper at 22".

 

Commons and maybe some minnows in the pond?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Hello Kokonuts :)

 

I'm still around, mostly on another forum these days with my tropical community tank.

 

But I decided to start a pond, and where else to go but here? Good idea!

 

I am looking for input.  I have ordered a 100g cedar framed, stand alone pond, roughly 5.5ft by 4.5ft (hexagon shaped), 16 inches deep.  Could you link me to this pond?  The approximate dimensions you give suggest almost twice the indicated volume.

 

I ordered the Tetrapond filter and pump FK5 kit:

http://www.amazon.com/TetraPond-FK5-Filtration-Fountain-Kits/dp/B0024EE8US?ie=UTF8&keywords=tetrapond%20filter&qid=1464197321&ref_=sr_1_7&s=pet-supplies&sr=1-7  Responsible sellers usually admit that the lowest pond size is for a pond with fish.  So this is for a 50 gallon pond with 2 fish.  You can use it short term.  Next year you can build a filter big enough for your pond.

 

Barley straws Not needed.

Power solar underwater color lights  Pretty.

Out door thermometer 

 

My questions are am I missing anything?  I have prime of course.  I am going to use filter material from my 33g aquarium to seed the tank and plan on adding matrix as my tap water has high nitrates in the 30-40ppm range.  Predator protection.

 

How many commons can this setup accomodate? 4? 5? ?  I don't want to overstock it.  The 20 gallons per goldfish rule works for ponds as well as aquariums.

 

Best floating nitrate absorbing plants that will provide cover for them?  I was also going to add in a few potted umbrella plants for additional shade.  And would like something that will bloom and is safe for them.  Potted terrestrial/marginal plants will be the best for absorbing nitrates.  Pot them in gravel and put them on a stool or other stand so some of the gravel is above water level.  Irises should work.  Canna lilies grow well this way.  You can certainly have a water lily.

 

How do you keep nitrates in check in a pond?  besides the plants and matrix?  do you do water changes in a pond?  I wasn't sure on this. I change ~10% daily.  I do this by dripping fresh dechlorinated water into the pond from a container.  Then I have an overflow pipe in the pond to dispose of excess water.  Your pond will develop a "carpet" of algae on the sides that will also use nitrate.

 

In the winter I was planning on using a de-icer meant for water troughs so I can over winter them there.  It will freeze solid if I dont with that depth.  My understanding is a de-icer will keep the water around 40-45 degrees.  Is this a doable temperature for commons in the winter?  Please link me to the de-icer that claims to keep the water at 40-45F in a Wisconsin winter.  I know Madison is warmer than Eau Claire, where I grew up, but I have trouble believing you could keep open water in a small container when it gets below zero unless you have a greenhouse over the pond, insulation around it and then a power-sucking heater in the pond.  If you could, that temperature would be fine for any but the most delicate goldfish.  I recommend a winter pond in the basement.  A kiddie wading pool is fine.  In November you set up the indoor pond, move the filter and fish in and drain the outdoor pond until spring.  With a grow light you might be able to keep the plants alive indoors.

 

Thanks for your help.  I hope that was helpful,  I felt you might get discouraged by some of what I had to say. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Thank you so much @shakaho, no I'm not discouraged, I appreciate the help.  It takes alot after all these years of fish keeping to discourage me :)

 

Ok, so instead of buying the 325 pump I can return it to amazon and get the 550gph pump for 20.00 more.  It says 250-500g.  The pond comes with a 325g pump so maybe I don't need this one anyways.  I just couldn't tell if it had an input hose attachment that I can attach the filter alone with.

 

I think the volume calculator doesn't know its a hexagon but I will link you here.  I am purchasing the 165g pond:

http://kimsponds.com/index.php?p=4#165 gallon Pond Kit

 

I thought I needed the barley to prevent algae, green water in a natural way (by creating CO2).  I like the idea of algae, just not green water.

 

My husband is only agreeing to the pond if I agree to winter them outdoors.  I know lots of people do it with koi and goldfish so am hoping I will be successful.  I am in zone 5 here in Madison (-10 to -20 degrees) which sounds right.  What I like about this heater is that it will float or can be submerged.  I was thinking of buying two, one to float and one to submerge in the 250w range.  It says it will keep the water above freezing.  I talked to someone in Minnesota who mentioned his pond stays around 40 degrees.  Here is a link to the one I am looking at:

http://www.amazon.com/8125-Perfect-Climate-Deluxe-250-Watt/dp/B001KCFE8U/ref=sr_1_1?s=pet-supplies&ie=UTF8&qid=1464222723&sr=1-1&keywords=pond+heaters+for+small+ponds

 

This is so new to me.  Do you feed them in the winter weekly or something?  Not even sure on this.  I know the nitrifyers die.  I was thinking of keeping the filter running.

 

Ahh, I just noticed my old signature.  I miss those little sweethearts.  They eventually all died from swim bladder issues.  I will only be getting commons/comets for my pond!

Edited by CindiL
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

 

 

I think the volume calculator doesn't know its a hexagon but I will link you here.  I am purchasing the 165g pond:

http://kimsponds.com/index.php?p=4#165 gallon Pond Kit

 

OK, it has seats and such that makes the size of the pond much larger than the size of the water.

 

I thought I needed the barley to prevent algae, green water in a natural way (by creating CO2).  I like the idea of algae, just not green water.

 

Good filtration handles green water.

 

My husband is only agreeing to the pond if I agree to winter them outdoors.  I know lots of people do it with koi and goldfish so am hoping I will be successful.  I am in zone 5 here in Madison (-10 to -20 degrees) which sounds right.  What I like about this heater is that it will float or can be submerged.  I was thinking of buying two, one to float and one to submerge in the 250w range.  It says it will keep the water above freezing.  I talked to someone in Minnesota who mentioned his pond stays around 40 degrees.  Here is a link to the one I am looking at:

http://www.amazon.com/8125-Perfect-Climate-Deluxe-250-Watt/dp/B001KCFE8U/ref=sr_1_1?s=pet-supplies&ie=UTF8&qid=1464222723&sr=1-1&keywords=pond+heaters+for+small+ponds

 

I'd still build a "greenhouse" over the pond, and put bags of leaves around the outside for insulation.   :)

 

This is so new to me.  Do you feed them in the winter weekly or something?  Not even sure on this.  

 

The standard procedure has been to stop feeding below 50F.  The latest trend has been to feed very lightly through the winter, like about 1/10 what you feed in the summer.  Feed the same food you do in summer not that low protein "winter food" the companies want you to waste your money on.    My summer pond temperatures are in the high 80s by day and drop to about 80 overnight.  In winter, when air temperatures swing wildly the ponds usually run from 55 to 70F.  I feed half as much in the winter as in the summer.  

 

I know the nitrifyers die.

 

Really?.   :)  Consider the nitrifiers in the soil.  They change the ammonia released by decomposing into the nitrate that land plants want.  These nitrifiers live in the top several inches of soil.  Now the soil freezes how deeply in Madison?  And stays frozen how long?  Yet, once the soil warms up in the spring nitrification resumes.  This has two possible explanations-- either the nitrifiers survive in frozen soil or they die out and spontaneously generate in the spring.  If they survive in frozen soil, why should they not survive in cold water?  People who believe that their filter nitrifiers die in the winter, drain, clean, and dry their filters and store them somewhere  for the winter.  Then when they set up their filters in the spring, sure enough, they have to cycle them all over again.  Those who don't believe this nonsense, may drain their filters to avoid damage from freezing, but put their biomedia in bags and toss them in the pond.  In the spring they set up their filters, fish the media out of the pond, rinse it off and put it in the filter.  By the time the fish have warmed up enough to eat and produce ammonia, the nitrifiers are ready to oxidize it.

 

I was thinking of keeping the filter running.

 

Good idea.

 

Ahh, I just noticed my old signature.  I miss those little sweethearts.  They eventually all died from swim bladder issues.  I will only be getting commons/comets for my pond!

 

I have more than 20 adult fantails born and raised in my ponds.  None have had swim bladder problems, which don't occur much in pond fish.  I suspect natural food and exercise have something to do with this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I was going by these facts:

http://www.bioconlabs.com/nitribactfacts.html

It states no nitrification occurs at 39 degrees.  I guess it doesn't say they die though.....until it reaches 32 degrees.

 

Thanks for all your help :)

 

I'm excited to get this started in a few weeks.  I'll post pics after its up.

 

If this was your pond...how many fish (fancy or common) would you put in?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I would start that pond with 2 fish maximum. Get through the cycling process and the green water phase and decide from there.

You'd only put in 2 in the 165g?  I will be using a whole sponge from one of my aquarium HOB's.  I have it 80% stocked (according to AQ advisor) so it has to have a fairly decent sized bio-load with 35 small fish.  I was thinking of starting with 4 and some minnows.

 

I have read lots of reviews on the barley packs and they seem to really help prevent green water with the CO2 they put out.  Hoping its true.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

CindiL, on 26 May 2016 - 12:02 AM, said:

I was going by these facts:
http://www.bioconlabs.com/nitribactfacts.html
It states no nitrification occurs at 39 degrees. I guess it doesn't say they die though.....until it reaches 32 degrees.

I figured that was your source.   :) . The most important statement in this article is

 

"Most of this information can be applied to species of Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter in general, however, each strain may have specific tolerances to environmental factors and nutriment preferences not shared by other, very closely related, strains. The information presented here applies specifically to Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter strains ()." In the original version of this article, they had (grown in Biocon labs)  in the parentheses so the last sentence made sense. 

While I don't question the statements they made about their laboratory strains of Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter, this has absolutely nothing to do with the nitrifiers found in ponds and aquariums.  Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter are the predominant AOBs (ammonia oxidizing bacteria) and NOBs (nitrite oxidizing bacteria) in sewage.  While these can be found in some pond/aquarium filters, they are rarely the
predominant genera in established biofilters.  Ammonia oxidation mainly is the work of archaea  of the phylum
 Thaumarchaeota.  Nitrospira dominates in nitrite oxidation.

 

So many people have been deceived by this article which has no relevance to naturally-occuring nitrifiers in your filters.  The only way these bacteria would be in your system is if you bought their bacterial products, put them in your tank, they survived, and then you dosed your system with the bacterial product regularly to keep the native nitrifiers from taking over.

 

If this was your pond...how many fish (fancy or common) would you put in?

 

I would plan to ultimately carry 6 or 7 adult goldfish.  More, and you have to work to hard to maintain it, fewer, and the adults may not eat enough of the eggs to prevent a population explosion.  However, I wouldn't consider trying to keep that bioload with just the submersible filter.  I would build a ~ 15 gallon upflow biofilter.  How many you stock initially depends on the age of your fish.  You could certainly put in 6 or 7 inchlings to start with.  They will grow through the summer and early fall, but not through the winter in cold water.  You may have two years before you have to increase filtration.

 

If you want to start with larger fish, I would agree with DP's two.  Wait a month to be sure your nitrifiers are well established, then add fish at a frequency no greater than one every two weeks.

 

I never experienced a "green-water phase".   I don't have a trace of green in any filtered pond, but if I take a bucket of water from a pond and set it out, in a few days, it turns green.   If I pour that green water into a small pond, the water turns greenish, but every trace of the green is gone the next day.   Algae compete with nitrifiers for ammonia.  If you start with a good populations of nitrifiers,  you shouldn't get a green water phase.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

I wouldn't put any trust in reviews of barley straw.  Even those that aren't posted by company employees, have little validity.  Here is an article that sounds reliable.

 

DP, all or almost all aerobic decomposition produces CO2, however, if that inhibited algae growth, you could throw any plant material in the pond and it would work.   In fact, heavy oxygenation during the day can inhibit green water since photosynthesis requires CO2 and can be inhibited by O2.

Edited by shakaho
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

So you have me wondering if the nitrifyers in my aquarium will not do much good in my pond? It's worth seeding it with them though? I do use only RO in my aquarium (with replenish and alkaline buffer and fresh trace) but will be using well water for the pond which is high in alkalinity. The ph is not too far off (7.9 for the RO and 8.3 for the well), GH somewhat off, 160 or so for the RO and probably closer to 250 for the well water, same for KH, which is 100 for the RO and closer to 300ppm for the well water.

I checked my nitrates today of my well water with the outside spigot and it was 8.0 (using a photometer) so this would be a good time to fill it up. Hope it comes soon before they rise :)

I need to pick your brain on something else knowing that you were a biology teacher (if my memory serves me right). The question is on fishless cycling and how much nitrite is too much. This is an argument that comes up frequently about whether or not Nitrites over 4.0 or 5.0 will actually stall a fishless cycle. I found some scholarly articles that show free ammonia is actually the biggest issue with nitrobacter growth and that it inhibits the growth until ammonia drops near 0. I also did find an article which I will link to that showed that nitrites as low as 2.9mg/l would inhibit nitrobacter growth from the nitric oxide. But then another study showed it was 50% inhibited when levels rose to 16mg/l. Your input would be really helpful. I don't know if that question comes up here a lot too. It's hard to decipher the articles but I know you can probably help! There were quite a few out there that discussed free ammonia and nitrobacter inhibition, some as little as .1 (in higher ph scenarios).

The information on both nitrosonomas and nitrobacter inhibition from NH3 and nitric acid:

http://nitrification.org/

http://www.ebsbiowizard.com/2010/11/factors-impacting-nitrification/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Good thinking!  

 

What did I say that suggested the nitrifiers in your aquarium aren't good for seeding your pond?  

 

Why do you use RO water in your aquarium?

 

Look at Figure 1 in the first link.  He shows that any ammonia concentrations above 0.1 ppm and nitrite above 0.2 ppm inhibit nitrification (not very much at the lower levels).  Nitrite concentrations over 2.8 inhibit both ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation.  (I think)  I can't find the thesis, so I can't really evaluate.  

 

The Buday paper is here.  I haven't studied it yet, but the 16 ppm gives 50% inhibition is not an experimental result but something that comes out of an equation.  I don't know what data goes into that equation.  :idont

 

You must remember when reading those old papers that they often use sewage sludge, which I expect can behave differently from aquarium water.

 

From my experience and many reports on this forum, fishless cycling takes at least 2 months, while fish-in cycling with water changes to minimize ammonia and nitrite takes about a month.  Why the difference?  The most obvious difference is the ammonia.   Why do people use 4 ppm ammonia for fishless cycling?  I guess they think more is better and have been warned that somewhere around 5 or 6 ppm the ammonia will poison the nitrifiers.  Then when the ammonia starts to drop, they insist on adding more ammonia to feed the poor starving AOBs/AOAs, and keep the nitrite spike going for a month or more with the NOBs bathed in nitrite and ammonia.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

 

What did I say that suggested the nitrifiers in your aquarium aren't good for seeding your pond?  

 

I guess I was thinking that since there are so many strains of aob's and nob's (hundreds?) that the difference between my aquarium water and tap would be so great that I was unsure how well those particular strains would do.  With a slight ph difference, a large temperature difference outside and even the differences in GH and KH I didn't know how well they would do.  I still plan on using a whole sponge from one of my HOB's though.

 

Why do you use RO water in your aquarium?

 

A number of reasons I guess.

1. My nitrates during the year range from 5-80, this time of year they're fairly low but in winter they get high and even with all my plants and pothos and bamboo it just wasn't enough.  Though I have added matrix to my HOB's and now after about 6 weeks my nitrates are staying at 0 in my aquarium!  Wish I had tried that a long time ago.

2. My tap has high silicates, phosphates the diatom battle got old!

3. I like to keep german blue rams who have a hard time thriving in my regular well water.  I lost my last couple to columnaris as well as losing 60% of my stock before I got it under control.

4. My aquarium 33g, is near the kitchen sink which is only RO so this is simpler for me now.  I fill a 12g bin with it, aerate and heat it (to offgas my CO2 in the well), re-mineralize and pump it into my aquarium.  Its an easy system these days.

 

From my experience and many reports on this forum, fishless cycling takes at least 2 months, while fish-in cycling with water changes to minimize ammonia and nitrite takes about a month.  Why the difference?  The most obvious difference is the ammonia.   Why do people use 4 ppm ammonia for fishless cycling?  I guess they think more is better and have been warned that somewhere around 5 or 6 ppm the ammonia will poison the nitrifiers.  Then when the ammonia starts to drop, they insist on adding more ammonia to feed the poor starving AOBs/AOAs, and keep the nitrite spike going for a month or more with the NOBs bathed in nitrite and ammonia.  

 

So if you were to do a fishless cycle what would you do then?  I know the 4.0ppm is standard everywhere it seems.  On Fishlore's forum where I am at a lot these days, people successfully cycle with fish-in, n two weeks using Tetra Safe Start Plus or Seachem Stability IF they keep the fish load to one small fish per 10g.  This goes along with the lower ammonia and nitrite idea.  In fact, tetra says if your ammonia hits 2.0 then it has failed.  

 

When fishless cycling, I usually tell people not to dose more than 2.0 ammonia with these products but even that is just a guess on my part and seems to work, though I am thinking maybe 1.0 would be better.  So when ammonia falls to 0, how long do you think it is ok to not re-dose without starving the AOB's and letting the NOB's catch up?  Lately I tell people to give it 24-36 hours without re-dosing when their nitrites have spiked and the ammonia has fallen but I don't actually know how long the AOB's are alright without food.

Edited by CindiL
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

 

 

What did I say that suggested the nitrifiers in your aquarium aren't good for seeding your pond?  

 

I guess I was thinking that since there are so many strains of aob's and nob's (hundreds?) that the difference between my aquarium water and tap would be so great that I was unsure how well those particular strains would do.  With a slight ph difference, a large temperature difference outside and even the differences in GH and KH I didn't know how well they would do.  I still plan on using a whole sponge from one of my HOB's though.

 

Strains?  At least millions, but most of them will work just fine even if the environment differs.  Meanwhile, the native AOAs and NOBs will drift in on dust or with critters that land in you pond.  The nitrifiers in the soil of the plants you put in the system also seed it.  As time passes the nitrifiers will be naturally selected to a perfect fit with their environment. 

 

RO explained.

 

From my experience and many reports on this forum, fishless cycling takes at least 2 months, while fish-in cycling with water changes to minimize ammonia and nitrite takes about a month.  Why the difference?  The most obvious difference is the ammonia.   Why do people use 4 ppm ammonia for fishless cycling?  I guess they think more is better and have been warned that somewhere around 5 or 6 ppm the ammonia will poison the nitrifiers.  Then when the ammonia starts to drop, they insist on adding more ammonia to feed the poor starving AOBs/AOAs, and keep the nitrite spike going for a month or more with the NOBs bathed in nitrite and ammonia.  

 

So if you were to do a fishless cycle what would you do then?  I know the 4.0ppm is standard everywhere it seems.  On Fishlore's forum where I am at a lot these days, people successfully cycle with fish-in, n two weeks using Tetra Safe Start Plus or Seachem Stability IF they keep the fish load to one small fish per 10g.  This goes along with the lower ammonia and nitrite idea.  In fact, tetra says if your ammonia hits 2.0 then it has failed.

 

I can see little reason to do a fishless cycle other than "I don't want to change water."  If I were to do one again I would start with 1ppm ammonia.  Once the nitrites clear, I would test with 2ppm.  If that cleared in a day, test 3 ppm and then 4ppm.  The later represents the ammonia output of a large fish load.

 

There's a saying among pond people, "Cycling is a 3 week process, which, with the addition of bacterial products, can be completed  in just 21 days."  If you have one small fish (how small?) in a ten gallon aquarium and did even modest water changes how would you know when the tank had cycled?  You shouldn't see ammonia or nitrite unless you have those super-sensitive tests that go down to 0.01 ppm.  Frankly, I haven't seen anyone report success in using the Tetra product with a control.  Those who have done a control (same thing without the product) report that it doesn't work.  Stability (a weird product) gets mixed results.  

 

When fishless cycling, I usually tell people not to dose more than 2.0 ammonia with these products but even that is just a guess on my part and seems to work, though I am thinking maybe 1.0 would be better.  So when ammonia falls to 0, how long do you think it is ok to not re-dose without starving the AOB's and letting the NOB's catch up?  Lately I tell people to give it 24-36 hours without re-dosing when their nitrites have spiked and the ammonia has fallen but I don't actually know how long the AOB's are alright without food.

 

Do a google scholar search on "starved ammonia oxidizers" "starved nitrifiers."  Depending on conditions they may be starved for weeks or months.  Most of the papers look at recovery times from starvation.  Read this paper..

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • Regular Member

Hi again, still waiting for my pond but instead of doing fishless I setup a 30g sterilite bin (doubled up) and yesterday I picked up four small "feeder" comets.  I got a calico, a black/gold and white, a white with orange spots and an orange with a neat tail that has black and white in it.  Its amazing I only paid .29 cents a piece for these little guys.  They're about an inch and a half long.  They're hiding, hovering at the bottom, hopefully it won't take two long to figure out I'm the food giver.  They're all eating so thats a good sign so far.

 

I setup my tetra pond filter.  I ended up sending back the 50-250 and got the 250-500g which has the 550gph pump.  I am glad you gave me the advice on the smaller one not being adequate.  Nice big filter that will sit at the bottom of the pond and two large filter pads plus room in the bottom so I put in a liter of Seachem Matrix to help with nitrates.  It has brought my aquarium nitrates to 0, great porous product allowing for anaerobic de-nitrifyers to live inside.  I just tested my ammonia and nitrites this morning with my photometer (sensafe) and they're all at 0 so the two little pieces of filter floss I sandwiched in the filter seem to be doing their job so far.

 

I dropped 6 Lilly starters in the bin and will plant in bins once I get the pond.  I purchased some floating planters that I bought some umbrella grass to put in.  Ordered a few water hyacinths and have a couple of floating starter packs I found at home depot that have mini cattails and a couple of small white flowering plants (anemopsis californica and houttuynia cordata.  Now only if my pond would arrive! :)

 

I'm looking at getting the Sun Sun submersible 13w uv filter for the summer months.  We have had green water issues with our fountains in the past and I don't want to hassle with it.  I need to read up more on it but looks like a good choice since its fully submersible.

Edited by CindiL
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

With plants in your pond, you shouldn't have green water .  I fail to see the ecological sense in randomly killing small organisms that go through the filter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

With plants in your pond, you shouldn't have green water .  I fail to see the ecological sense in randomly killing small organisms that go through the filter.

I'll hold off on buying it for now.  Maybe you're right, I hope so.  I'll have 6 submerged lilly plants and I know the umbrella grass is good at nutrient uptake.  Can only assume the cattails and other plants will do the same along with the hyacinths for some sun shade.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
  • Regular Member

Hi, I got my 165g patio pond setup 2 weeks ago.  I used that media from my aquarium and have 0 ammonia but I continue to have low nitrites, anywhere from .10-.20 (I have an eco-exact photometer).  I did a 20% water change yesterday (about 30g).  I think its because the temperatures fall at night, sometimes to upper 50's and on hot days go up to 90.

 

How worried should I be about this?  Is it common?  I am not sure how toxic nitrites under .25 are, though I know they can't be great.  I'm not sure what I should do about it besides dosing prime every couple of days.

 

Ended up with 4 comets from 1-2" in size, and 8 rosy red minnows.

 

I have two lillypads that have made it to the surface and my hyacinths are doing great :)  

I am really enjoying having it.

 

Trying this:

 

2016-06-17%2013.14.23_zpskue20hpk.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Just add salt at a rate of 1 teaspoon per 10 gallons of water.  This will not affect the nitrite reading, but will protect your fish from nitrite poisoning.  I recommend changing 10% of your pond water daily.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...