Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
GothSpice

Clamped fins on new fry

Recommended Posts

I know that Prime detoxifies the ammonia so its less harmful, but I end up using a ton of it now and I really like not seeing ammonia at all on my test kit. I find that these do a great job of ridding the tank of the ammonia faster. I'm still building my cycle back to its full strength (my tank is new) so its useful to me. Just figured it might help you out a tad. The carbon is nice, too. :)

Just to say, I don't think this will be necessary once your cycle builds up nice and strong, but its really helped me out with my new tank. Ammonia stays out nicely and the water stays wonderfully clear and odor free. Not sure how much it costs outside of Amazon, but I bought it with the Add On program with a bag of dog food and I find it immensely helpful.

You'll have to work out the dosage, as there is really no instructions on that, but it really does not take much at all. I use about 30 grams in each filter and that does the trick. Higher ammonia levels may require more. Haven't had to change it yet and many people say it can last up to 2 months.

Edited by mjfromga

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The carbon will remember the meds so don't use that product.

Edited by LisaCGold

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah yes... Carbon will remove meds. Perhaps you can try it after the meds are done.

I did forget about that since I am not medicating, sorry!

Edited by mjfromga

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you haven't already, you'll want to make sure the anti ammonia filter pads do not have any carbon.

Edited by LisaCGold

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Prepare 10 gallons of water with the medication (one packet per 10 gallons) to use for water changes that you need for water quality.  The instruction I don't want you to follow is the one that says to add fresh activated carbon (to remove the medication).   Just used medicated water for water changes for the two weeks.

 

Don't add any salt in these water changes.  we don't need it for now.

 

How's he doing?

Sharon, I could be wrong, but I think the salt will help prevent nitrite toxicity. Water test showed nitrites.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One more thing, regarding bottled bacteria, I don't think they are very helpful. You can choose to feed your fish lightly until your cycle reestablishes itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One more thing, regarding bottled bacteria, I don't think they are very helpful. You can choose to feed your fish lightly until your cycle reestablishes itself.

I've heard good things about a product called BioPro to help with a cycle. It was pricey when I saw it and I was skeptical, so I'm wondering if its any good?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all so much! I'm not currently treating the violently-ammonia'd tank with any medicines, so I think I'll order some of that stuff and see if it helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Somehow, in this long thread with too many contributors, everyone, including myself, appears to have overlooked the following conditions:

 

* Brand of test-kit used and whether strips or drops?  I don't know what they use at petsmart, but it was strips. I bought Jungle Quick Dip Ammonia Test Kit strips last night. They're pretty rudimentary.

 

* Tank size (how many gals.) and how long has it been running?  Tank is a 5.5 gallon, and it's been running since I got my fry roughly 3 weeks ago.

 

* How many fish in the tank and their size?  2 goldfish fry, each only about the size of my little finger.  

 

* What kind of water additives or conditioners?  I condition my tap water with Tetra Aqua Safe Plus before putting it in the tank with each water change. I put two capfuls of Tetra Safe Start Plus bacteria in a few days ago, but he's had clamped fins the entire time I've had him.

 

* How often do you change the water and how much?  At first I was doing 50% a couple times a week, but I've slowed down to about 30% once a week.

 

 

To summarize:

 

We have 2 fish, ~ 2 inches tl, in a 5.5 gallon uncycled tank with minimal filtration.

The water changes are far below what we recommend for a cycled tank.

The water has never been tested with a reliable test kit.

She doesn't have Prime.

 

 

We (myself included) have been recommending medications for a fish in bad water, without first correcting the water quality issue.  We don't normally function this way.

 

Those other than members of the mod team need to re-read this thread.  We welcome suggestions from other members when these are given through the Report button.  We do not want these comments on D/D threads!  When many people post,  they tend to respond to one another rather than to the OP, and that has happened on this thread.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How is Asimov now?

 

GothSpice,  I need to apologize for my responses on this thread.  The information you gave on the form clearly indicates poor water quality.  This causes more sick fish than any disease and can cause disease by weakening the immune system of the fish and making them susceptible to bacteria and parasites that they normally would fight off.  Fortunately, poor water quality is one problem that we can always correct.  

 

The first problem you have is that your filter has not cycled, or at least had not cycled at the time you filled out the form.  It did not yet have a full population of the bacteria that convert ammonia to nitrate.  It had some nitrate, which indicated it would complete cycling soon.  We do not recommend products that claim to help with cycling.  All of those that don't have an expiration date do not contain the kinds of bacteria required to completely cycle the tank, although they may cause a temporary reduction in ammonia.  

 

That leads to the second problem.  Unless you have obtained a test kit using drops, like this one, we can't be sure of the levels of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate in your tanks.  I was surprised that Petsmart used strips, which lack both consistency and accuracy.  Perhaps Petco uses a better test. 

 

You said "And because I had to separate Kritlaq from Asimov so he wouldn't get sick as well, and all I had was my new dirted/uncycled tank, I've been having to do 70% water changes twice a day to keep ammonia at a safe level! "  

 

One small fish should not produce a dangerous level of ammonia in two days, let alone part of one day.   How much ammonia did you read?  How big is this tank?  Perhaps this ammonia comes from the dirt?

 

Please get a new container for Kritlag.  You don't need an aquarium.  A plastic tote that holds at least 10 gallons of water will do.  If you change half of the water in that container daily, he will not have an ammonia problem unless you have ammonia in your tap water.  

 

Also get Prime water conditioner.  Used in frequent water changes, it will protect against up to 1 ppm ammonia and nitrite.  The dosage for ten gallons is 1/5 of a teaspoon (you can use 1/4 t), so a little bit lasts a long time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I apologize too. Product recommendations don't belong on disease threads, though I really do believe it will help with a new tank as it has greatly helped mine. :) Hopefully your fishy gets better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh my gosh, okay. I'll swing by Petco and get the API Masters test kit and the Prime, I'm 90% sure I've seen them both there before. The Petsmart used drops to test the water for me, the rinky-dink strips I got were from Walmart in desperation at like 1 a.m. -_-" And I think the ammonia must be coming from the dirt as you said, though I have a real hard time trying to clean the pebbles on top of any old food/excrement. The siphon I bought is a joke, so I think I'll just do it the old fashioned way and suck on a hose to get it going XP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't suck on a hose. There are things in the water you don't want to eat.  Take the hose and put one end in the water.  Keeping that end down and the other out of the water, gradually sink the rest of the hose.  When the other end has sunk, the entire hose will be free of air.  Put a thumb over each end and take one end of the hose out. and put it in the bucket.  Uncover the ends and you are siphoning.  If the tank has a lot of stuff in it, you can fill the hose in a bucket using the same procedure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So Asimov seems to be responding to the medicine, if only a little. He's no longer bottom sitting, and he unclamped for about 5 minutes yesterday. That's probably the most I've ever seen his dorsal fin since I got him! The Seachem stuff seems to be helping with the ammonia in the other tank as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad to hear Asimov is feeling better!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Asimov's health is definitely improving. He's not at 100%, but he's unclamped his fins and is swimming about normally. I'd like to show a compare and contrast:

Here he is maybe two weeks ago when I first joined Koko's and Bmitchell486 thankfully warned me to be on the look out for illness, which very well may have saved his life:

image_zpsxovjjhgz.jpeg

And here he is this morning:

image_zpsmeorgh03.jpeg

A marked improvement! Thank you all so much for your help and kind words! Quick question, is the black on his fins him healing? I read that somewhere, and I'm hoping it's true! I know it's not ammonia burns, because I've been watching the levels like a hawk, and doing 100% water changes every-other day when I medicate him. Thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they weren't black before, yes.  He might well have suffered ammonia burns before you got him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, he is looking so much happier! Good job!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they weren't black before, yes.  He might well have suffered ammonia burns before you got him.

Yeah the black is new. Oddly enough, his tankmate, Kritlaq, was originally dark gold & lots of black, but now he's mainly gold with a white underbelly and black accents!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aw yay!!!  I am so glad he is improving!  Early detection is so key, especially for new fish who have quite a lot of adjusting to do!  You're doing such a great job, and these fish are living a fairytale dream with you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I tried reintroducing Asimov & Kritlaq, but it failed miserably. Kritlaq spent all night hounding and harassing Asimov, so first thing in the morning I separated them. Since then, he's been clamping his fins again. It's been several days, and I've been salting him again, but to no avail. Tonight I've put him back on the General Cure. Is this a bad idea? I've been doing 80-90% water changes every other day, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...