Jump to content

Angelfish pH range


vwashbur

Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

Hi guys,

It's been quite a while since I have been on here and since I've had a tank but my boyfriend has talked me into getting one up and going and we decided to have a try at angelfish.

The tank is a 40 gallon breeder and we have two angelfish (they will be the only fish in this tank) and as it turns out they are a mated pair. We brought them home this AM and by this evening we had a nice batch of eggs. They don't appear to have a noticeable dot indicating that they are viable, however.

Water parameters are 0.25 ppm for ammonia, just between 0.25 ppm-0.50 ppm for nitrite and 10 ppm for nitrate. A water change is in store for tomorrow AM to bring those numbers down.

My main concern is the pH - it reads 8.8 on the high range pH for the test kit. I've check twice to be sure. I'm not familiar with angels and while I've done my research into them before purchasing I've gotten several different answers on this topic. What is the most acceptable pH for angelfish? I know they can be flexible and resilient but this may shorten lifespan and health. And what are the most ideal options to reduce my pH should I need to lower it? We've moved from where I used to live when I had a tank and have never had this issue with my water quality.

Thanks in advance for any advice you have.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

First of all, welcome back.  :hi

 

pH is my bane, Mysterygirl is my name. What are you using to test the pH? I've driven myself crazy, only to find that the test I was using was flawed. API high pH? Strips? a pH meter? Let us know.

 

And....best fishes!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Angels do better in a lower pH 6.8-7.0 is a good range. They can adapt to a higher ph, but that pH to me would be really pushing and I would not risk it myself but its up to you.

What happens to your water if you let it age? Does the pH raise, drop, or stay the same?

Get the nitrites and ammonia down to as close to zero as possible they are very very sensitive fish. If you have cycled media from another tank, seed the 40 gallon with it. That should correct the issues or at least make it super manageable.

That's aweosme that they are a pair! And an awesome tank size for the two. Do you have any lictors of them and the tank set up? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Miley, that's what I thought. What would you suggest to bring the pH down? I'm reading into drift wood but it's indicating that tannins will harm them? It also seems the cappata leaves (Indian almond leaves) seem to be highly suggested, but I'm not seeing much information on HOW to use it.

I'm not entirely sure what happens when the water ages. We've just moved to this area and I've only just started testing the water. I will keep an eye out.

We are doing a 50% WC tomorrow to reduce ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. Unfortunately no cycled material available. A fish store offered but I saw some ich in some tanks and declined.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

That's definitely on the high side for angels.

Angels are a south American species.  They live in more acidic water like a large variety of tropical fish we see in our hobby. 6.5 being a happy number.

If you can keep it at 7 that's great too.  There are some buffers out there that will buffer you water to 7. http://www.seachem.com/Products/product_pages/NeutralRegulator.html
This way you don't have to play with measuring quite as much to balance between high and low.

And yes you need to deal with the ammonia/nitrite/nitrate.
They can be delicate fish when not cared for properly.
 


http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/cichlid/southamerican.php

 

One of the most famous South American cichlids among aquarists is Pterophyllum scalare, the freshwater Angelfish. Due to its Latin name, the Angelfish is also called Scalare. This South American cichlid lives in slow flowing streams and rivers where the water is soft and acidic. When you keep Angelfish the pH-value in the aquarium should be between 6.5 and 6.9 and the dH between 0.6 and 1.2. Poor water quality can easily make your Angelfish refrain from eating and good filtration and frequent water changes are therefore necessary. In comparison to many other tropical fish species kept by aquarist the Angelfish is a sturdy species when it comes to parasite attacks. It can however succumb to the common Ich (the Ichthyophthirius parasite) or Exophthalmia, especially when stressed by high levels of soluble waste, unsuitable water chemistry, a poorly decorated aquarium etcetera.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Miley, that's what I thought. What would you suggest to bring the pH down? I'm reading into drift wood but it's indicating that tannins will harm them? It also seems the cappata leaves (Indian almond leaves) seem to be highly suggested, but I'm not seeing much information on HOW to use it.

I'm not entirely sure what happens when the water ages. We've just moved to this area and I've only just started testing the water. I will keep an eye out.

We are doing a 50% WC tomorrow to reduce ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. Unfortunately no cycled material available. A fish store offered but I saw some ich in some tanks and declined.

ive never had an issue with pH and I'm not entire sure. I would try like a neutral regulator perhaps

Where did you read tannins hurt them??? I have never in my life heard that.

Please test your tap pH and post that. Your tank is 8.8, correct?

Edited by Mikey
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Sorry I meant "mikey" - autocorrect always gets me. I'm not sure how to post a photo using my phone? I would be happy to with instruction!

:rofl it's okay I'm in my brothers phone as Miley purposely :P

Photobucket is a good app :) download that, make an account, upload some pictures, click the little "I" in the left or right corner I forget haha and copy the IMG link and post that here :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

The driftwood itself doesn't lower the pH, the tannins in it do. So how could they be and for angels is what I'm getting at? People always recommended driftwood with angels

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

It was several website pages ago - I'll go back to see if I can find it again. I never had any issue using driftwood though in community based tanks before so I would have to agree with you. But I always like to look into something if it's brought up so I thought I may as well verify.

Lol your brother must enjoy a good teasing I take it!

Hm, I had a photobucket account before... I look and see if I can get back in

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

As with any body of water, excess carbon dioxide, decay, waste, etc.... Lowers ph.  (same concept inside the human body when we exercise) That's why for GF its suggested to airate and age water and you may see a boost in ph for some folks.
Driftwood, Indian almond leaves.  Yes those are great things to add. 

Any new wood should be soaked for a day or 2, or boiled to get most of those tannins out.  You don't need your aquarium turning brown.  It does still help somewhat with ph after that.
Tannins wont do squat to your ph if your kh wont allow it.  You've obviously got really hard water so I doubt driftwood would do anything to it.  You will need some kind of buffer like the one I linked.
Did you post a kh or am I totally blind?

 


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Yeah tannins won't hurt them at all I have never heard that they would lol

Always hahahahaha

Okay :)

I don't see a kH just the pH. So tap pH would be great as well :) if it is close enough to 8.8 I would recommended a 90% water change instead of a 50%

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Calamity,

We do have a bubble wand in the tank to aerate further - I'm sure over time it will assist. As of now there is very little decay in the tank being that these fish are the first inhabitants.

I'm reading into your suggesting on the buffer right now. It seems a good option at the moment.

I didn't list a kh value. Unfortunately, the kit I have does not test that. I will see if I can get that number for you.

Tap water pH is 7.4 and I did just retest the tank water and it comes out 8.0 now - an improvement from earlier today.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Okay, if your tap pH doesn't go much higher than 7.4 then I would say a piece or two of driftwood of a decent size will keep your pH perfect.

I would do a 70% so to not drop the pH too much, but that will also help remove the nitrites and ammonia more than a 50% would.

After a few hours test the pH and report back :)

Let's leave a cup of tap water sitting out overnight and see what the level is in the morning.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Here we go:

image_zpsu53pxgi6.jpeg

image_zpszaqykmux.jpeg

They aren't the best quality But you can see the set up. The white is the female, Luna and the black is the male, Winston (for Jameis Winston per my boyfriends request)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

My last angel lived for 4.5 years.  I had a ph of 7.4 to 7.6.  I think stable is better then messing with it and having lots of ups and downs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...