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Pool as a Pond?


FishyMandy

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Do you have any able relos?

Host a bbq with pond building activities. Really you would just need a levelled sand surface with old carpet on top. Then drill holes through sleepers and screw it all together with massive bolts. That eg. Is highly simplified but if you have a couple on nice friends or relos you could ask if they would hel do the heavy stuff?

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I wish that cost wasn't an issue :rofl Though if I waited until Around August I could probably get the $800 preformed but I don't know if I want to wait that long and if there are cheaper options for the same capactiy that will work well I'd rather go with those

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Yea :D Much bigger than my 600 litre I have now. I can't see any issues with it and just like with the other options I'll line it if needed and if for some reason it doesn't work at least its only $50 and not a a couple hundred :P

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I personally have no issues with a somewhat deep tub. Unless it is actually deeper than it is wide or something odd like that where the fish have nonswimming space. I guess there is always the concern a fish with a weak swim bladder would be negative effected by the depth as well. I have never known surface area to be a limiting factor in fish care. It can easily be overcome using a bubbler or by having adequate water flow through the filter and returning to the pond in a manner that agitates the surface. With my small gravel big filters, the water returns like a waterfall, about 1.5 feet back to the water. As the water from the fall splashes into the pond, it pulls air down with it. The returns are always filled with bubbles. And I'm just rambling on now... Let's see a picture!

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I forgot to save the pic before the ad was taken down :(

They didn't give measurements but from the pictures it is definitely wider than it is deep. If I had to guess I'd say 2foot deep, maybe 2.5. Of course it is hard to tell from pictures. My tank is 2 foot deep so I don't see an issue, especially since my one fish who didn't like deep water is gone now. 

 

I thought deeper helped the water to not heat up so quickly as well? Which will be nice since we are getting some pretty hot days this Summer and anything heats up pretty fast even when it's in the shade

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In Australia ya pretty much gonna be screwed by freight costs for anything pre formed.

And for the size your talking about you will have to go ahead and build it yourself to keep the cost down.

Checkout my above ground for a few ideas. Its built from sleepers with a liner.

If i may. What is your current budget situation? Will assist with ppls ideas rather than throwing ideas around that are way out of reach.

Besser blocks are ok to use. But rather pricey here and unless you're good at concreting then id forget it.

Happy ponding.

Edited by blackmoors
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http://www.bunnings.com.au/200-x-75mm-3m-sleeper-wet-treated-pine-_p8500073

9 of these is under $200. And there is cheaper around.

With these you could easily achieve your goal.

Get decent srews (that may be ya dear bit)

And a good liner will prob be around the $400 mark.

Plus some pool sand for the base. (Under liner.

Some reo-bar for strength on long sides.

And some weed matting to linr the sides to stop splinters tearing the liner.

You could achieve a 600mm deep 2.8m x 2.8m pond with the above.

Or shop around and go 3.4 x 3.4 x 0.6

Or of course smaller.

But end the day your still in it around the $7-800 area

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I could give you a bunch of references to aquaculture research, but I will simply tell you my experience.  I have two in-ground ponds and at any given time anywhere from four to eight container ponds depending on how many excess youngsters I have.  All of my ponds receive the same maintenance, 10% of the pond volume of fresh water dripped in daily, filter volume equal to at least 10% of the pond volume. All have phytofiltration, primarily plants growing in the top of filters. The ponds range from 8 inches to 30 inches deep.  My experience says that-- in my yard-- the shallower the pond, the healthier the fish.  My largest, deepest, and most lightly stocked pond is the one I think of as the "death pond".  I don't lose many fish, (the reason I have such a population problem) but most of those I lose are in the "big" pond.  I have never lost a fish in a pond 8" deep these are the "available" fish and I will never confess to the stocking level.

 

I currently have about 20 adult fancies (and a bunch of fry), all but one home-grown.  I have rehomed probably about 20 more adults.  The incidence of swim bladder disorder in my fancies is easy to compute -- zero%, since I have never had a floater.  My oldest fancies are in their fourth or fifth year and all move continuously when awake.  Fancies need swimming area much more than pond-type fish because their bodies become  heavier with every year. Swimming a lot helps keep them in shape and avoids the obesity that leads to swim bladder disorder.

 

Three or four years ago,  when I had a huge excess of baby fish and virtually all survived, I had to put all my long-bodied fish into a couple of stock tanks.  They had the same surface area, but one was a 50 gallon 1 foot deep and the other a 2 foot deep 100 gallon.  I put the littlest ones into the 50 gallon tank and the bigger ones into the 100 gallon.  At least 2/3 of the total number of fish were in the 50 gallon but the fish load was about the same.  A year later, the fish in the two tanks were about the same size.  At this point it was clear the fish load in the shallow tank was much greater than in the deeper tank since most of the fish were the same size.   I added a filter to the small tank.  At about 2 years after I set them up, just before I finally succeeded in giving them all away, I had some deaths -- all in the 100 gallon.  Fortunately, that was just when I finally succeeded in giving them all away.

 

If you have an in-ground pond, the deeper the pond, the more stable the temperature.  The earth serves as a thermal sink.  However, with a pond totally above ground, unless you have thick insulation around the sides, pond temperature should be a function of volume, not depth.

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Putting plants around the midday side of the tank in three different height layers will help a lot! Plants are amazing like that

Did you get that tank? I'm excited!

U realise I'm living my pond dream through u [emoji15]

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Thanks everyone :)

I have committed to buy this tank since it was so cheap, so right now I think I will use that for at least a temporary upgrade and if it doesn't end up permanent it will give me time to save money and either work out the labour to build my own or buy a preformed. I wish that cost and physical limitations weren't an issue but unfortunately they are.  I only have two fancies in my pond a fantail and a tele the rest are comets and I'm planning on getting shubunkins eventually.  If it comes to it and the depth is a problem I can bring the fancies back in or convince dad that we don't need the carport and set up the smaller pond there for them. Though they have been in my deep tank for a long while with no problems so far :)

 

I'm willing to learn as I go and change things if needed and thought even if this tank isn't suitable for a permanent feature then it will be a good hold over for my growing youngins until I can save the money. By August I could have money for a preformed or to build my own. It's still something I'd love to do but I do worry about my own skills/limitatons and making it hold! But if I can spend the next 8 months researching I may be able to work something like that out :)

 

I also hope it doesn't sounds like I'm shooting down anyones ideas or opinions! I'm all for exploring different things, just some will be a lot further in the future than others

 

Edited by FishyMandy
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I strongly believe in container ponds as the best option fior begining ponds.

 

My original plans for my "back pond" included a 300 gallon Rubbermaid stock tank as a main pond and a 50 gallon  Rubbermaid as a bog filter.  Then I decided to dig and line a pond and a bog filter.    I didn't get the 300 gallon because in weighed 90 pounds and I am a little old lady who can't move 90 pounds.  So I decided to dig a lined pond, which still, 4 years later, doesn't work.

 

Go for the container.  If it turns out bad, nothing is easier to correct.

Edited by shakaho
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I also hope it doesn't sounds like I'm shooting down anyones ideas or opinions! I'm all for exploring different things, just some will be a lot further in the future than others

LOL, everyone likes to give opinions, particularly when they aren't spending the money or doing the work.  

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I could give you a bunch of references to aquaculture research, but I will simply tell you my experience.  I have two in-ground ponds and at any given time anywhere from four to eight container ponds depending on how many excess youngsters I have.  All of my ponds receive the same maintenance, 10% of the pond volume of fresh water dripped in daily, filter volume equal to at least 10% of the pond volume. All have phytofiltration, primarily plants growing in the top of filters. The ponds range from 8 inches to 30 inches deep.  My experience says that-- in my yard-- the shallower the pond, the healthier the fish.  My largest, deepest, and most lightly stocked pond is the one I think of as the "death pond".  I don't lose many fish, (the reason I have such a population problem) but most of those I lose are in the "big" pond.  I have never lost a fish in a pond 8" deep these are the "available" fish and I will never confess to the stocking level.

 

I currently have about 20 adult fancies (and a bunch of fry), all but one home-grown.  I have rehomed probably about 20 more adults.  The incidence of swim bladder disorder in my fancies is easy to compute -- zero%, since I have never had a floater.  My oldest fancies are in their fourth or fifth year and all move continuously when awake.  Fancies need swimming area much more than pond-type fish because their bodies become  heavier with every year. Swimming a lot helps keep them in shape and avoids the obesity that leads to swim bladder disorder.

 

Three or four years ago,  when I had a huge excess of baby fish and virtually all survived, I had to put all my long-bodied fish into a couple of stock tanks.  They had the same surface area, but one was a 50 gallon 1 foot deep and the other a 2 foot deep 100 gallon.  I put the littlest ones into the 50 gallon tank and the bigger ones into the 100 gallon.  At least 2/3 of the total number of fish were in the 50 gallon but the fish load was about the same.  A year later, the fish in the two tanks were about the same size.  At this point it was clear the fish load in the shallow tank was much greater than in the deeper tank since most of the fish were the same size.   I added a filter to the small tank.  At about 2 years after I set them up, just before I finally succeeded in giving them all away, I had some deaths -- all in the 100 gallon.  Fortunately, that was just when I finally succeeded in giving them all away.

 

If you have an in-ground pond, the deeper the pond, the more stable the temperature.  The earth serves as a thermal sink.  However, with a pond totally above ground, unless you have thick insulation around the sides, pond temperature should be a function of volume, not depth.

I have enjoyed your posts in this thread. I don't feel like you need to post sources etc as you have established credibility of your own. I think we often have differing view points based partly on our large difference in climate zones as well as my increased frustration with fish that need to be babied for health reasons. My switch to a Koi only pond is not far off!

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