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Moving Fish to Pond?


FishyMandy

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Hi guys :)

I've been thinking about moving a couple of my tank guys to my pond. I haven't really decided yet but the ones I've been thinking about moving have been in my tank for between about 1-5years

 

 

Otherwise I just wanted to see how they would go in the pond and have some of them outside to watch apart from just my babies. I'm still very undecided on all of this since I love seeing them in my tank..but to help in my decision I wanted to know if there is anything I'd need to do to help them adjust to pond life from tank life?

 

Two of the fish I'm thinking of moving are Telescopes and one is a fantail

I was also kind of thinking about moving my Comet, but he has been in my tank for over 7 years so I don't know if I could bring myslf to do it lol

Edited by FishyMandy
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There are a few things you would need to do, assuming your pond is large enough to hold that many fish and is protected from predators:

 

1. Acclimate them to the temperature of your pond, if there is a major temperature difference. You can do this by putting the fish outside in a bucket of clean water until the temperature equalizes.
2. Do a big water change / vacuum in the pond. This will make a difference in how any current pond fish view the newcomers. It's pretty much the same concept as rearranging the tank.

3. Reinforce your current predator protection. When adding visually impaired tame fish to a pond, it's extra important to have strong protection from predators. These fish are more likely to come to anything that moves, and that makes them easy targets at first.

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Thanks Chelsea!  That all sounds like things I would do before moving anyone so that's good to know :). I'm still really undecided though so we'll see what happens :P I could be asking all this for nothing LOL. 

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I have to say, though, that I really love what the pond does for my fish every summer. They get so vibrant and healthy when they get fresh air, sunshine, and lots of bugs and algae to eat. They also grow quite a lot. :) Yes, sometimes it is hard to not have them indoors to see, but it gets you outside more to go visit them.

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It really doesn't matter how long a goldfish has been in an aquarium, it will love a pond.  I find regularly that fish get friendlier when they move to a pond,  

 

I repeat what Chelsea said about covering your pond.  However you have a very difficult pond to cover because of the irregular shape and also because you have plants in the pond.  As it looks now, you could drape netting over the pond and plants and anchor it to to ground by laying bricks on it.   Not a very convenient solution.  

 

Another possibility:  remove the potted plants to a veggie filter --a tub that sits where you have the filter now.  You will have to put an outflow pipe on the tub, Which you can do easily with a uniseal.  Move your filter so it empties into the plant tub.  Now you can cover the pond.

 

I recommend that you get what we call "hardware cloth" which is actually a fencing material with small holes.  You can use fencing with holes somewhat larger if you can't find the small mesh.  Then lay this over the pond, using the pond as a template to cut a cover that extends at least 2.5 cm beyond the outer edge of the pond on all sides.  Then get some  hose similar to  this and some cable ties.  Use the cable ties to fasten the hose to the under side of the fencing.  Then you have a custom-fitted cover than won't slip off.  

 

I will describe some other solutions on your pond thread.

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Do it!

As for predators. The biggest issue you will have are cats, rats and birds. (Maybe?)

Netting can be helpful for this. But its also a pain to access the pond and to see through and focus on the fish.

Ive never had an issue with any of my ponds, but as a precaution i fitted netting. But found it anouying. That's when i put the fishing line up. Easy to see the fish etc and not an eyesore.(you can see it in my pond thread)

Happy ponding.

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Cats rarely fish, but when something starts taking fish, pond keepers usually blame neighborhood cats.  When people put out a camera to see the culprit,  in the US it almost always turns out to be a raccoon or a heron.  Both are very persistent  once they have taken a fish.  Things that worked before the predator tasted your fish don't work at all afterwards, so it's very important to get the pond covered before you have hungry visitors.

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Yep i will certainly make sure its covered enough. Im not sure what predators we get in this area. We dont have raccoons and dont think we have herons. I know once theyve found a spot they will keep returning!

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Youd be surprised what birds we have near us Mandy.

Take a drive to Sturt creek or the new Oaklands road reserve.

Kingfishers and crow's are pretty plentiful.

I run fishing line tightly strung over my ponds and out from it (where it wont anouy me) i have bits just tied one end that blow and move around in the wind. The birds hate it as its unpredictable and invisible. They just feel something touch them and they take off.

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That sounds like a great idea blackmoors! I saw how you had it in your thread too. I'm going to try something like that. I knew about crows but not kingfishers :yikes I mainly see galahs and cockatoos around my house so I had no idea what I was proofing against, other than the fact I knew it had to be done (Because I know just because I haven't SEEN something it doesn't mean its not there!)

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I hate to be disagreeable or argumentative, but I feel obligated to give a warning.  I have been reading pond forums regularly for about 6 years.  I have seen dozens of people advocating fishing line over the pond.  A couple of years later, they report something like this:

 

"Also noticed a dreaded heron about one week ago- haven't had any issues all yr until now. My observations thus far:

-it seems to show up SAME TIME EVERY DAY (9 AM, 5 PM) despite being chased off by wife 2x. Therefore, once they find their "honey hole", IMO- they're coming back for more!
-placed fishing line trip-wire web, motion detector/sprinkler, and music 2 days ago 
-just a little while ago, noticed the the motion detector/sprinkler going off- sure enough heron was there, somehow weaved his way through the wire gauntlet -neither seemed to deter him (music was off)
Thankfully, no koi gone missing thus far (haven't been able to check them thoroughly yet for wounds as was the case for one of my koi who survived a heron
 harpoon 3 yrs ago-see below).. Short of netting whole pond, don't know what else to do..? "

 

I have to correct one thing.  Predatory birds have amazing vision.  While flying, they can see the finest mesh/wire and stay away because they fear getting trapped.  Eventually, however a bird will land near the pond and walk over for a look, and if you can work through the lines, so can birdie.

 

While hundreds of  fish eating birds live within a mile of my home, I never saw one check out my ponds for four years.  Then one day I walked out and a great egret was standing next to a stock tank pond watching the fish through the cover.  

 

006.jpg

 

My stock tank ponds were all covered like this, but I still spent the day moving them into the screened pool enclosure.  Big Birdie kept coming back and seemed to find the game of moving just out of the reach of my swinging rake very funny. He landed on top of the pool enclosure, and stalked around the structure looking at the tubs of delicousness that he couldn't reach.

 

038.jpg

 

My "front pond" Had been running for 4-5 years, with a partial cover about 70% of the pond.  It had covered the whole pond before I enlarged it.  In addition, I had some plant tables in the pond that provided cover.  No predator had ever bothered it.  

 

As soon as I had the other fish in the pool enclosure I went to secure the front pond.  I took out the plants and used the stock tank covers to cover the open part of the pond, leaving only a crack about 3-4" wide to make room for the hoses to come out.  Yes, it looked ugly, but have you ever seen a fish that has been speared by a heron?

 

The next time I looked out the front window, there was Big Birdie checking out the front pond.  A heron that has observed prey can stand motionless for a half an hour waiting for the prey to come within reach then stab incredibly fast.  Big Birdie checked out all of my ponds every day for three weeks.  He got two fish from the front pond through that little crack (no covers were moved).  After that, he was out of luck, since the fish did not come near that opening.  Goldfish aren't stupid.

 

I now have a full cover over that pond, including a part that fits around the hose that goes to the filter.  My cover rises at least a foot above the water since a heron can stab through a net that is close to the water.  He can't get it out, but it is either maimed or dead.

 

Yes there are herons in Australia. http://www.pbase.com/ian_c/waterbirds&page=all

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Thanks Sharon! I will see what I can work out that both looks good and allows me to enjoy the fish and keeps my fish safe. 

 

I was originally going to make a filter with the plants in it but I don't have any of the tools (or a lot of skill in that area) to make holes and such for the hoses and pipes :( I might be able to make some sort of frame that will fit over the pond. I don't have a whole of space and it's hard to secure anything down because the whole area is concrete/brick.

 

I also want something that is easy for me to remove/replace when I need to 

Edited by FishyMandy
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You can construct a small gazebo with plastic pipe and fittings. You can make something a simple as this (but smaller), cover the top with shade cloth, and the sides with bird netting, which is almost invisible. Or you could make something fancier like this.  If it gets cold in the winter, you can cover the frame with plastic to make a greenhouse.

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Thanks for those ideas!

Right now there is a clothesline directly above the pond that 'covers' the surface of the pond and is covered in shadecloth. I could attach birdnetting to each side of it to create 'Walls"?

 

I have less than a metre of area on each side of the pond (at least where its flat and doesn't start slanting)  and a few metres of flat, non slanting area in front of it. My yard is kind of long but really narrow.

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Ok the clothes line may be an issue then for a gazebo. I have seen them 2.4m x 2.4m at bunnings etc.

But yeah you could attatch shade clothe or netting to the sides and drape it down to form sides/walls

If the clothes line doesn't come out far enough cable tie some conduit /pvc to it in the form of a frame.

And use some plastic buckets filled with concrete and insert the uprights into the concrete and allow to set.

You can throw some fake/plastic plants in too to hide the bucket if you like.

Then wrap it all up. Viola an avery of a difference. .... to keep birds out not in lol. And you can sit inside away from the sun and flies etc.

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Another arch design-- a simple "hoop house."   People usually make the small ones as cold frames/greenhouses, which is why they have plastic covers.   If you make a hoop house of plastic pipes  (click on "12 steps' to get the rest of the instructions) and cover it with bird netting, you can easily lift it off when you want to work on, watch, or show off your pond and put it back on when you leave.  

 

In the winter you can cover it with plastic and keep your fish comfortable on the coldest days.

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