Jump to content

Acceptable / realistic age


Recommended Posts

  • Regular Member

If the average lifespan of a fancy goldfish is 3 years (and that was just a guess), it is only because of the very high mortality of very young fish.  If half of the fish died in their first 6 months (call that age zero), the other half would have to live an average of six years for the overall average to be 3 years.  

 

In the 19th century, the average life span in the US was less than 50.  Did that mean that a 50 year old was at death's door?  Of course not.  People lived into their 70s, 80s, 90s, and 100s.  However ~20% of those born died before the age of five, and most of those in their first year.  Actually, those who reached the fifty year mark had much the same chance of reaching a healthy old age as 50 year olds today.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

It is a personal battle of mine i have to say up front, but many 'commercial export' FG are just culls and many will not survive another year because the breeder knows his fish. There..... i said it.......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

It is a personal battle of mine i have to say up front, but many 'commercial export' FG are just culls and many will not survive another year because the breeder knows his fish. There..... i said it.......

 

And I bet you feel better having said it.  :teehee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

If the average lifespan of a fancy goldfish is 3 years (and that was just a guess), it is only because of the very high mortality of very young fish.  If half of the fish died in their first 6 months (call that age zero), the other half would have to live an average of six years for the overall average to be 3 years.  

 

In the 19th century, the average life span in the US was less than 50.  Did that mean that a 50 year old was at death's door?  Of course not.  People lived into their 70s, 80s, 90s, and 100s.  However ~20% of those born died before the age of five, and most of those in their first year.  Actually, those who reached the fifty year mark had much the same chance of reaching a healthy old age as 50 year olds today.   

 

I don't consider being old the same as being at death's door.

Edited by Mr. Hyde
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Not at all Fanatailfan1! I will have to correct this fact, if only for my own peace of mind..........

 

Many hours, many disappointments. But i still love the fish regardless and i actually believe those breeders feel the same way......

Edited by Hinfin
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

This reminds me of an episode of Frasier where he tells Niles:

I am not "of a certain age," Niles.  I am smack dab in the          middle of "not a kid anymore."  I won't be "of a certain age"          for another ten years.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

This is a really productive discussion. Personally, based on zero research but over 3 years of reading here, you have as Sharon says the massive die offs of young fish for bazillion different reasons, then the mortality caused by poor husbandry, followed by the fish owned by people who can actually keep fish alive.  

 

Of the third group, some die anyway despite good care (mystery infections, wen ulcers and sudden death).  Tanks are fundamentally different than ponds for many reasons and while pretty much everyone on the forum with tanks has a fish that has lived well past 3, they have had more that died before they had them a full 3 years (although how old the fish actually reached can be difficult to know).  

 

My older fish shows signs of all the things Sharon mentioned - sensitivity to water quality, weight gain and balance issues, and an infection that we had to really work to beat.  All of these things hit around the 4 ish year mark. In fact, it is like having a completely different fish now and we are very careful with him and his care.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Supporter

I think there are a lot of factors, to many really to set a number for what is old age. I think 3-5 year average life expectancy is a good mark to tell people when they ask about the expected average life expectancy. Now how long can they live? I have a comet I got 19 years ago in an outdoor pond. I know we are talking fancies here and that was stated at the start of the thread so that is a mute point. That said I think fancies can live 10+ years but that's like saying people can live 110+ years. It happens but its not a given by any means.

Edited by Daniel E.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Knowing the actual age of a fish can be hard or down right impossible.

Unless you or someone you know bred the fish.

I have fry that are only a few weeks old and yet theyre the same size as some that are a month or two old...

I also have one of mine thats only 9 months old and yet it dwarfs its parents in size.

So going by a fishes size in a fish store and judging its approx age may not be helping any to? The lfs may say "this fish is about 3-4months old or this fish is about 1yr old. When really they dont have a clue. (Unless they bred it themselves which i doubt. Over here anyway. Theyre all from wholesalers)

And there lies another problem.

Bagged up at fish farms. Courier to airport. Quarantine then bagged up again freighted where ever maybe quarantined again (more harsh chemicals) then freighted to lfs.

by time they arrive in store here they have travelled half way around the world in a plastic bag with poor water quality by end of trips only to be shoved in a quarantine tank and doused with god knows what chemicals etc.

talking to alot of shops they suffer severe losses in shipping and quarantine.

then theyre in over crowded display tanks and huge currents with kids taping on the glass until someone buys them.

then they take em home and quarantine again with more chemicals. ....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

If you want your fish to live longer, take this tip from me, feed your growing babies a few times a day in small amounts, your toddler-teen fish a one-two times a day in moderate amounts, and your adult (2-3 years plus) fish every other day in moderate amounts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

How do you do that when you have fish of different ages in the same tank? I cant forbid the older fish to eat...

 

Ah, there you do have a problem. Answer? More tanks. :)

 

However if it were me, i'd feed to the oldest fish, i.e. every other day.

Edited by apecentral
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

LOL

 

Is there a topic about how much to feed that I can read to get into this stuff? (and so we dont get too much off-topic here)

In Holland feeding every other day is considered starving...

Edited by AllieCalhoun
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

LOL

 

Is there a topic about how much to feed that I can read to get into this stuff? (and so we dont get too much off-topic here)

In Holland feeding every other day is considered starving...

 

My fish seem fat and happy. I'll put it to you this way. I tend to have a heavy feeding hand, i can't help it. I love to feed fish. But after I lost some prized goldfish to over feeding, i vowed to never again to it. Now i feed my adult goldfish every other day. its worked brilliantly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Read this. The author has a huge goldifsh breeding establishment and advanced education in fish biology.

 

Goldfish pellets contain the nutrients goldfish need in a small dry lump.  Think if them like the concentrated rations soldiers carry on the battlefield.  One mouthful of pellets probably provides a fish with more food than it needs for the day.  A goldfish will consume that mouthful and be ready to grab another in 30 seconds or so.  Consider that many people follow the instructions on the fish food container which say things like "Feed your fish 2 to 4 times a day giving no more than they can eat  in a few minutes."  If you do the minimum recommended, 2 feedings of 2 minutes each, the fish gets 8 mouthfuls a day.  

 

In nature goldfish eat all day long, feeding on very wet food with low caloric value.  They retain the instinct to eat all the time in spite of the fact that we supply them with highly concentrated food.  

 

Many people here feed gel foods, either homemade or commercial, like Repashy.  Some feed low calorie vegetables, particularly greens.  This gives an opportunity to satisfy your need to feed a "hungry" goldfish without making it fat.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

Read this. The author has a huge goldifsh breeding establishment and advanced education in fish biology.

 

Goldfish pellets contain the nutrients goldfish need in a small dry lump.  Think if them like the concentrated rations soldiers carry on the battlefield.  One mouthful of pellets probably provides a fish with more food than it needs for the day.  A goldfish will consume that mouthful and be ready to grab another in 30 seconds or so.  Consider that many people follow the instructions on the fish food container which say things like "Feed your fish 2 to 4 times a day giving no more than they can eat  in a few minutes."  If you do the minimum recommended, 2 feedings of 2 minutes each, the fish gets 8 mouthfuls a day.  

 

In nature goldfish eat all day long, feeding on very wet food with low caloric value.  They retain the instinct to eat all the time in spite of the fact that we supply them with highly concentrated food.  

 

Many people here feed gel foods, either homemade or commercial, like Repashy.  Some feed low calorie vegetables, particularly greens.  This gives an opportunity to satisfy your need to feed a "hungry" goldfish without making it fat.

 

Yes great points.  Watch how much you feed. i err on underfeeding - which isn't underfeeding at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

This is an interesting thread. :)  Makes me a little sad though.  I've only had my orandas from Rain Garden (the breeder that wrote the article Sharon is referencing) for a month and half and I asked him how old they are when he shipped them.  My blue female is just over 2 years already and my white is just over a year.  I loved them from the moment I got them!  They already eat from my hand and greet me all the time.  Interestingly, my blue is already going through a colour change but that's another topic.  Anyway, I wish nothing but for them to be the exception :rolleyes:

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Regular Member

This is an interesting thread.  :)  Makes me a little sad though.  I've only had my orandas from Rain Garden (the breeder that wrote the article Sharon is referencing) for a month and half and I asked him how old they are when he shipped them.  My blue female is just over 2 years already and my white is just over a year.  I loved them from the moment I got them!  They already eat from my hand and greet me all the time.  Interestingly, my blue is already going through a colour change but that's another topic.  Anyway, I wish nothing but for them to be the exception :rolleyes:

 

 

Give them the proper care and you'll be surprised hopefully! Don't be sad, be hopeful!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...